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Simmo
2003-Aug-19, 08:56 AM
I'm just reading the latest Harry Potter book (OK, maybe not quit the right forum then), and have come across some Bad Astronomy.

Harry has to take a load of exams, including Astronomy, during the summer term - though it's never made entirely clear why it's important for young witches and wizards to learn astronomy (from the point of view of their magical studies that is).

Anyway, their exams include an astronomy practical which takes place at night and involves identifying and marking the positions of various celestial objects on a star chart and here's the rub; Hogwarts School is about a day's journey by train north of London, putting it somewhere in Northern Scotland. It barely gets dark up there in June, so astronomy, even at 11pm will be a challenge and spotting Venus and Orion, as Harry does, will be nigh on impossible at that time of day/year.

But then he may have a magical telescope (previous homework has included drawing the moons of Jupiter) so what do I know.

Alex W.
2003-Aug-19, 11:51 AM
I've actually managed to spot stars quite well, even in the outskirts of Edinburgh... I'm sure it would be possible to make out Orion and Venus in somewhere as secluded as Hogwarts.

Simmo
2003-Aug-19, 01:01 PM
OK, I suppose Orion and Venus are bright enough to be visible through the perpetual twilight of a northern night. But seeing Orion at 11pm in June is a challenge, it being a winter constellation. I'm not sure Venus ever gets far enough from the Sun to be visible after 11pm either, though I grant you that if the sun never gets much below the horizon it could be.

On the night of the practical there is also a bright moon and lots of light visible from the windows of Hogwarts, something one would have thought the astronomy professor would have taken into account with the scheduling since they'd make the practical harder. Unless this is the object of course.

jokergirl
2003-Aug-19, 02:44 PM
Hogwarts needs not to be half a trainride north from London; considering the train starts from a platform hidden inside a pillar, it could be anywhere (that passage is obviously some dimensional gate or at least a "magic" beaming device ;))

Here's pretending not to have read the books :lol:

;) jokergirl

captain swoop
2003-Aug-19, 03:39 PM
Hogwarts needs not to be half a trainride north from London; considering the train starts from a platform hidden inside a pillar, it could be anywhere (that passage is obviously some dimensional gate or at least a "magic" beaming device ;))

Here's pretending not to have read the books :lol:

;) jokergirl

In fact the station used as Hogwarts was Goathland, it's in the North Yorkshire Moors.

It has also been used for All Creatures Great and Small, Heartbeat, Poirot and Sherlock Holmes.

it's on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, it runs from Pickering on the south of the moors and follows Newtondale across the moors to Goathland where, after passing the summit it descends down a 1 in 49 grade along the valley side to Grosmont its northern terminus.

While they have a shed full of their own steam the loco used in the film was a Great Western 4-6-0 imported for the filming.

Goathland is used in a lot of period films as it hasn't changed since tit was built by the victorians, it has all it's original North Eastern Railway slotted post signals and interiors.

I live just over the moors and visit quite a lot.

Unfortunately the village of Goathland itself is a nightmare since it became 'Aidesnfield' the setting of the popular 'heartbeat' drama set in the 60s. On a typical summer weekend there are around 40 coachloads of visitors swarming all over.

Notable features of the line include the aforementioned grade, the worlds oldest purpose built railway tunnel and an embankment 'floating' across a swamp, the line deflects by up to 4 inches as a train passes over.

http://www.nymr.demon.co.uk/main/home_1.htm

Sunfish
2003-Aug-20, 02:25 PM
But Hogwarts itself is clearly on a magical island in Loch Eilt (NW Highlands) although I believe the cloisters are in Durham ;).

TheGalaxyTrio
2003-Aug-20, 03:02 PM
though it's never made entirely clear why it's important for young witches and wizards to learn astronomy (from the point of view of their magical studies that is).

Because Hogwarts is their only school. It's not in addition to some sort of normal school. Notice they also have classes like "Arithmancy" that probably teach basic math skills along with the spells. One wonders if tensors come into play at any point.

So along with the magic they need to learn the Three R's, but such things seem well integrated into the general curriculum.

Or I could be over analyzing.

At least it isn't pirate school. There they'd need to learn the Three "Arrrs". :D

Alex W.
2003-Aug-20, 05:00 PM
Y'arr, bad puns rolling in off the starboard bow... ;)

Hmm, I could always test this next year, if someone sends me a reminder...

Matherly
2003-Aug-21, 05:23 AM
Notice they also have classes like "Arithmancy" that probably teach basic math skills along with the spells.

Of course, Arithmancy is an elective so one assumes it is advanced andthat Harry and Ron have thier basic math down already.

That being said, there is at least one non-spellcasting class. Proffesors Blinn's (tedious) history class.

beskeptical
2003-Aug-21, 06:59 AM
Here's pretending not to have read the books :lol:

;) jokergirl

I've read 'em all, don't care what folks say. They have been my favorite books ever. I told my son over and over, nah, I don't want to read them. Then we got one as a book on tape. I listened to about 20 minutes of it and went back and started the series from the beginning.

But I'm not up to summer school yet in The Order of the Phoenix so I better stay away from this thread until I finish. :D

Ilya
2003-Aug-23, 03:18 AM
Hogwarts needs not to be half a trainride north from London; considering the train starts from a platform hidden inside a pillar, it could be anywhere (that passage is obviously some dimensional gate or at least a "magic" beaming device ;))


In the second book Ron and Harry get to Hogwarts in a flying car - about as fast as a train, and without any dimensional gates. So yes, Hogwarts is somewhere on the British Isles.

gethen
2003-Aug-23, 02:01 PM
I'm with you beskeptical. I didn't want to read that "brain candy" either, but I loved 'em. My son, who's doing research in astropysics, waited in line to buy the fifth book as soon as it came out. Sometimes you just gotta let go and enjoy a good story.

Humphrey
2003-Aug-23, 06:32 PM
oh i dont care what people think either. I love the books too. They are great reads. Very entertaining and amazing characters and stories. The world she has created is asmazing too. AFter these 7 books i will be very, very surprised if she or someone else does not start some offshoot books about different characters or places.


Even tought i wish she got the next book out next week, i hope she works hard on it and makes it worth the wait. I don't want to read a book that was bannged out to make a quick buck. I have read those (the horrible Prey by chrichton) and it makes the author look money hungry.

Mr. X
2003-Aug-24, 01:48 AM
--Points and shakes finger at Jokergirl, Beskeptical, Humphrey and Gethen, and Ilya--
HAA! AAH! YOU READ HARRY POTTER!
--Shakes finger some more--
AAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!
--Runs--

I'm so cool that sometimes I give myself freezer burn! 8)

ZING! \:D/

Chuck
2003-Aug-24, 04:02 AM
I read the Harry Potter books, but only for the food scenes. In Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone the first description of a banquet at Hogwarts sent me straight to the refrigerator. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, the description of a table groaning under the weight of the food didn't help matters. Harry Potter 6 will probably disable me and Harry Potter 7 will finish me off. I know I shouldn't read them, but I can't help myself.

Humphrey
2003-Aug-24, 04:17 AM
rofl Chuck. :lol:

Chip
2003-Aug-24, 06:47 AM
...their exams include an astronomy practical which takes place at night and involves identifying ... the positions of various celestial objects on a star chart and here's the rub; Hogwarts School is about a day's journey by train north of London, putting it somewhere in Northern Scotland. It barely gets dark up there in June...

Not an expert here but isn't Hogwarts kind of located as you say it should be, but in another dimension? After all, one has to slip through a brick wall at the train station and catch a train nobody can see from the previous...ummm... manifestation of existence ... as it were. So maybe it gets dark sooner there despite the location. Everything seems topsy-turvy there anyway. :wink:

gethen
2003-Aug-24, 05:51 PM
I read the Harry Potter books, but only for the food scenes. In Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone the first description of a banquet at Hogwarts sent me straight to the refrigerator. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, the description of a table groaning under the weight of the food didn't help matters. Harry Potter 6 will probably disable me and Harry Potter 7 will finish me off. I know I shouldn't read them, but I can't help myself.

So what happens when you read about the rather, uh, unusually flavored candies? I seem to recall an earwax flavor and a booger flavor. Never mind. I guess I don't wanna know. :wink:

captain swoop
2003-Aug-26, 08:21 AM
So what happens when you read about the rather, uh, unusually flavored candies? I seem to recall an earwax flavor and a booger flavor. Never mind. I guess I don't wanna know. :wink:

Weird candy was a direct rip from Monty Python.

Crunchy Frog?

Hamlet
2003-Aug-26, 01:55 PM
So what happens when you read about the rather, uh, unusually flavored candies? I seem to recall an earwax flavor and a booger flavor. Never mind. I guess I don't wanna know. :wink:

Weird candy was a direct rip from Monty Python.

Crunchy Frog?

Umm!!!! Crunchy Frog! (http://www.talpak.org/alakulat/python/jelenetek/frog.html) How about a nice Cockroach Cluster or Anthrax Ripple?

beskeptical
2003-Aug-30, 08:28 AM
Finished the book. Whaaaaaa :cry: ! It's over. Whaaaaaa :cry: ! I'm ready for the next one. How many years will I have to wait?

OK, as to the night sky, they did make it clear that they had to wait a while until dark. Here in Seattle we are about at the same parallel as the southern tip of England. It gets dark enough for star observations by 11 or so at night. So maybe they stayed up until midnight. My 14 year old certainly does. :roll:

Acusing JK of stealing material? Come on, every writer has life experiences that show up in their material. The HP stories are written by an incredibly talented writer who has produced incredibly original scenes in her books. So Monty Python mentioned boogars and/or something akin to Bernie Botts Every Flavored Beans. HP stories are massively popular because they are such great stories and full of very imaginative scenes.

Mr. X, you are missing a wonderful 'escape the world' fantasy. You should try the books on tape while commuting if you have a commute to work. It does wonders for stress. Until the story runs out that is. Whaaaaaa :cry: ! It's over. Whaaaaaa :cry: !

(I'm a girl, I'm allowed to cry and to enjoy children's books without repercussions. That's one benefit anyway. :wink: )

Ab_Normal
2003-Sep-02, 04:27 PM
(I'm a girl, I'm allowed to cry and to enjoy children's books without repercussions. That's one benefit anyway. :wink: )

Indeed! And one of the advantages of being a parent is I can say that I'm checking the book out to make sure it's okay for my sprog; aren't I a good responsible parent. ;) It's also a good excuse for renting Miyazaki films and otherwise indulging in G-rated media.

gethen
2003-Sep-02, 05:24 PM
So, beskep and Ab, I suggest that, in the interests of your children's development, you also check out The Thief of Always by Clive Barker, who usually writes for adults (horror and such) but has penned at least one book for young readers. I would really hate for your offspring to read this one withut your having carefully examined it first. :wink:

beskeptical
2003-Sep-02, 06:41 PM
With that recommendation, Gethen, I will have to read that book.

Spirited Away was an incredible animation masterpiece, Ab_. I loved it. We actually bought the Japanese version with English subtitles before the American version was released.

Humphrey
2003-Sep-02, 07:27 PM
some of the books that helped my transition from kiddie books to full fleged novels was the junior fiction of the likes of Heinlen and Christopher Pike. I highly suggest them to anyone with late elementry school aged kids. or younger. :-)

I still remeber sititng in my parents bedroom on the couch reading Christopher pike (teenage dramas and a few horror) while my mom read her big novels. :-) Good memories.


(Just don't tell them you love to read it too at your age. I will then become uncool. :-P )


I lliked the 5th harry potter. But my favorite is still the 4th book. Hopefully the 5th book still deals alot with hogwarts school. Those are my favorite parts when she describes the school and classes itself. :-)

Ab_Normal
2003-Sep-03, 11:32 PM
So, beskep and Ab, I suggest that, in the interests of your children's development, you also check out The Thief of Always by Clive Barker, who usually writes for adults (horror and such) but has penned at least one book for young readers. I would really hate for your offspring to read this one withut your having carefully examined it first. :wink:

Being Clive Barker, I'll definitely have to check it out first. My spawn really enjoyed Michael Chabon's Summerland (fantasy and baseball! It's a winner!) Carl Hiaasen's Hoot is also on my check-out list; I really like his other works, but I don't think of him as a kid-friendly writer by any stretch of the imagination.

Humphrey, I tried Heinlein on her (specifically Farmer in the Sky), but she was turned off by the total lack of useful female characters. Wonder how that happened. (Note: She's 10 now. I'll try it again in a year or two, see if that makes a difference.)

beskeptical: I've long been a Miyazaki fan, from Nausicaa on; Spirited Away was the only movie we went to multiple times in the theater this year. (My husband and daughter went three times. Darn it, I had to work that last time.)

Humphrey
2003-Sep-04, 12:14 AM
Several of heinlens later "Adult" novels have strong female leads, but those are very "adult". You might want to try "have spacesuit, will travel. " if i remeber right, that has a strong female lead.

Ab_Normal
2003-Sep-05, 10:59 PM
Several of heinlens later "Adult" novels have strong female leads, but those are very "adult". You might want to try "have spacesuit, will travel. " if i remeber right, that has a strong female lead.

The spawn got about half-way through that one before bogging down. Right now we've started her on Madeline L'Engel, which she is enjoying. Maybe she's just not ready for hard SF... how did I have a fantasy fan? How? ;) (I read fantasy, SF, mystery, non-fiction, anything that doesn't move too fast and has print on it.)

daver
2003-Sep-05, 11:25 PM
Several of heinlens later "Adult" novels have strong female leads, but those are very "adult". You might want to try "have spacesuit, will travel. " if i remeber right, that has a strong female lead.

The spawn got about half-way through that one before bogging down. Right now we've started her on Madeline L'Engel, which she is enjoying. Maybe she's just not ready for hard SF... how did I have a fantasy fan? How? ;) (I read fantasy, SF, mystery, non-fiction, anything that doesn't move too fast and has print on it.)

Schmitz has strong female characters. Piper's fun, but if she wants a female lead she's probably out of luck.

kilopi
2003-Sep-06, 08:07 AM
Several of heinlens later "Adult" novels have strong female leads, but those are very "adult". You might want to try "have spacesuit, will travel. " if i remeber right, that has a strong female lead.
The title character of Podkayne of Mars, by Heinlein, is female.

RickNZ
2003-Sep-07, 06:44 AM
Ok i admit im no J K Rowling fan so im bound to be a bad critic but did anyone else notice that book to be particulary bad?

beskeptical
2003-Sep-07, 07:11 AM
Ok i admit im no J K Rowling fan so im bound to be a bad critic but did anyone else notice that book to be particulary bad?

Nope. Order of the Phoenix was just as good as the first 4. 8)

kilopi
2003-Sep-07, 11:23 AM
Order of the Phoenix was just as good as the first 4. 8)
Agree. But longer.

Humphrey
2003-Sep-07, 05:20 PM
I didn't like the first half of the 5th book as much as the last half.

The last half was good, the hissy fiut that was the first part just anoyed me.

My favorite still is the 4th book. Very good.

frenat
2003-Sep-08, 12:14 AM
I thought she was way too long winded and could have cut her descriptions by half and still be fine. I did not enjoy it as much as the others.

beskeptical
2003-Sep-08, 12:15 AM
I didn't like the first half of the 5th book as much as the last half.

The last half was good, the hissy fiut that was the first part just anoyed me.

My favorite still is the 4th book. Very good.

Actually, I did have a similar reaction to all the 'everthing is bad for Harry' stuff. It seemed a bit overdone.

But...my son is 14 and he sort of views the world that way too. :P

gethen
2003-Sep-08, 03:11 AM
So I've been holding out, too cheap to buy the hardcover version of Order of the Phoenix and now I'll just have to pry open the wallet and do it. You guys are killing me. :wink:

Humphrey
2003-Sep-08, 04:52 AM
mmmuuuahahahahahaha!

beskeptical
2003-Sep-08, 09:04 AM
So I've been holding out, too cheap to buy the hardcover version of Order of the Phoenix and now I'll just have to pry open the wallet and do it. You guys are killing me. :wink:
You ought to be able to get a used copy by now.

Humphrey
2003-Sep-08, 05:15 PM
I never saw the point of returning books or seeling them back. One of my favorite things to do is re-read a old favorite book.


Even tought i have a very good memory for what i read, and even tought i remeber the entire book, i still love to re-read them.

gethen
2003-Sep-08, 05:28 PM
I agree wholeheartedly, Humphrey. The mark of a good book is that I keep it, instead of donating it to some bookfair or unloading it at a neighborhood garage sale. I would be embarrassed to say how many times I've read Tolkien's trilogy, or LeGuin's Earthsea books (which you really must read if you love Tolkien and Rowling.) Earth Abides, Salem's Lot, The Left Hand of Darkness, are all books that have been reduced nearly to shreds by use over the years.

frenat
2003-Sep-08, 05:37 PM
I just checked it out of the local library. Most of the community libraries here in Columbus are linked together and one can go online, reserve a book and it will be sent to the branch of your choice. You can then return it to any branch. It can even be renewed online. I haven't bought any books (aside from school books) in 4 years. If there are more requests then books available then a waiting list is formed and the books out can not be renewed. For this book, the demand was so high that there was a waiting list of over a thousand people before the book was released. I was somewhere in the 400s but still got it in the first week.

NASA Fan
2003-Sep-10, 05:48 AM
I too am a Harry Potter fan, and my belief was that the kids had to study Astronomy, to possibly get them ready for astrlogy, but also because some ingidients, and certain potions have to be picked or brewed based on the phases of the moon, and if you are learning about the moon, why not learn about the solar system.

It could of course just be that Rowling likes astonomy and thus used that as a subject. Before you argue that if she likes it she should be better, not neccessarily, I enjoy it, but the only constalation I can ever make out is Orion.

We may not have seen the importance of the class yet, it may be something we dismissed as trivial that will play an important role later on.

Chuckles121
2004-Jan-06, 12:04 AM
Notice they also have classes like "Arithmancy" that probably teach basic math skills along with the spells.

Of course, Arithmancy is an elective so one assumes it is advanced andthat Harry and Ron have thier basic math down already.

That being said, there is at least one non-spellcasting class. Proffesors Blinn's (tedious) history class.
sry im a lil late, but arithmacy is nothing like mathematics as we think of it.... sure it involves adding but its not like math in any other way... http://www.sorcererscompanion.net/arithmancy.html read this and it may help

Tessera
2004-Jan-09, 01:55 AM
Abarat by Clive Barker is very good and very weird. I listened to it, but it is worth reading the book because of the cool art. Be prepared for an abrupt ending of the book, but not of the story. Isabel Allende also came out with one for younger readers in the last year or so, City of the Beasts. A good read too.

I do like Harry, but I Prisoner of Azkaban is still my favorite.

Sigma_Orionis
2004-Jan-09, 12:56 PM
(I'm a girl, I'm allowed to cry and to enjoy children's books without repercussions. That's one benefit anyway. :wink: )

Ha Ha, I read almost every Harry Potter book (except the last one) just before I sat down and read the last Dune Installment (House Corrino)

Nyaahh! :)

Vega115
2004-Jan-10, 04:10 AM
*points to self* Harry Potter Fanatic!

OK, say Hogwarts is where you say it is, and it cant be able to see the stars and stuff at night all that well. Well heres the reason why they can see them:

Magic.

Hogwarts is hidden from the Muggle world, in some sort of "bubble" so any Muggle (non magic-folk) go to where Hogwarts is, they see an old, crumbling castle that says "DANGER! No Trespassing!". So, based on the idea of the muggle world not being able to see in, then the students and teachers must be closed off from the Muggle World when they are on Hogwarts grounds. Therefore, it would block out all the artificial light of the Muggle World. Now, students and teachers can exit (Dumbledore has visited London many a time) and therefore they are in the Muggle world, but once on Hogwarts grounds (and im guessin Hogsmeade - the only Wizard Only Town in all of GB) the Muggle world is shut out, and they are in The Magical World. There. It is settled.

Another point though...Hogwarts is described as at least 7 floors, with large cathedral ceilings (the entrance hall is described as you cant see the ceiling!), and the castle itself, the amount of land it covers, its just mammoth, because it has to fit about 1020 people (1000 students (yea the math dont work out, but JK Rowling says so and therefore it is) and about 20 teachers, based on the amount of courses we know there are). So figure, there is the Entrance Hall, and Great Hall, four areas for common rooms and dormitories, and classrooms, storerooms, offices, hallways. All lighted by candlelight. For those who have seen the movies, they will know what im talking about, (ex: (from the movies) http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/1630000/images/_1630515_hall.jpg - look at all those floating candles

http://i.ivillage.co.uk/uk_en/a_ukpix/celebrity/harry_greathall_186.jpg - not exactly a small room!

Hogwarts from the outside: http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38202000/jpg/_38202144_hogwarts300.jpg

and finally, an ariel view of the castle, to show is size in land area: http://yacht.zamok.net/DV/Potter/Posters/Drawings/hogwarts.jpg )

Taken from these, you can see that to fit a whole Astronomy class on top of a tower would be kinda hard since they come to a point. Although theres one tower in the middle that looks like theres a flat roof, or in the upper right corner there seems to be a flat roof where the class final test could be held. My point: With a castle of that size, brightly lit with candles, wouldnt the light of the school itself drown out some stars if they are on the roof, when all the light is shining underneath them? The light would be shining upwars, so to get the best view, theyd have to look almost directly at their zenith, but in the book, they are moving their telescope all around. I think the light of the school would DEFINATLY play a role.

BUT I must say that there is GOOD astronomy in OotP! When Ron is doing his astronomy homework, and Hermione checks it, and says stuff along the lines of "No, Io is this moon of Jupiter! Europa doesn't have these charateristics!". So props to JKR for including that! =D>

§rv
2004-Jan-10, 01:04 PM
I never saw the point of returning books or seeling them back. One of my favorite things to do is re-read a old favorite book.


Even tought i have a very good memory for what i read, and even tought i remeber the entire book, i still love to re-read them.

Finally someone who understands what I do. My parents and sister cannot comprehend why I re-read books. When they see me doing so they interrupt me and ask me what is the point of reading it because I know the storyline already.....the same goes for movies. You know sometimes you're just thinking and your thoughts stray to a book you read...and you feel to read it again. Only bad thing about this is that when you borrow books from people/library you can't exactly go get the book :(

R.A.F.
2004-Jan-10, 01:33 PM
I never saw the point of returning books or seeling them back. One of my favorite things to do is re-read a old favorite book.


Even tought i have a very good memory for what i read, and even tought i remeber the entire book, i still love to re-read them.

Finally someone who understands what I do.

I do the same thing...right now I'm re-reading a book about the history and construction of the Lunar landers...and I'm enjoying every page of it.

I think you'll find that lots of folks do this.

gethen
2004-Jan-10, 04:58 PM
Yep, as I said above, I've got lots of books that have been read, and reread, and reread, and reread ad nauseum. A good book does not lose its appeal when you've read it once. It gets better with repeated readings.
The first time through you may race through, eating it up like candy. Subsequent readings allow you to appreciate all the nuances and savor every bite.

einsteinsreject
2004-Jan-11, 12:31 AM
though it's never made entirely clear why it's important for young witches and wizards to learn astronomy (from the point of view of their magical studies that is).

Because Hogwarts is their only school. It's not in addition to some sort of normal school. Notice they also have classes like "Arithmancy" that probably teach basic math skills along with the spells.

Having just finished High School here in Scotland, I have to say that I wish we had been able to take Astronomy! Hogwarts doesn't really seem to teach 'normal' subjects - even the history is focussed on wizarding history - which I find strange, since I would have though that the wizarding community would be involved in some of the more muggle-oriented history (ie which king was on the throne, what parliament was debating, etc).

The pupils don't start Hogwarts until they're of high school age, so they were probably taught the basics of english, maths, etc at home - or else, like Harry, they grew up in the muggle world and went to primary school.

About the 'what can you see from Scotland?' sky-wise debate...
I live in Dunfermline, just north across the river Forth from Edinburgh, in a quite secluded spot.... and I can see nothing in summer! I have to wait every year for winter to have any viewing at all. One of my old teachers - who is astronomy mad - used to say the same.
If it's that bad down here, I don't know how Hogwarts could teach pratical astronomy in summer. It's already been mentioned about the amount of candles, though Harry does notice the light from the main entrance when the doors are thrown open and the Umbridge crew go after Hagrid - which suggests that it must have been quite dark, at least from Harry's perspective on top of the tower.

(As a by-the-by, everyone I know assumes that Hogwarts is in the north of Scotland. Here in Britain (since I assume there are a few non-British on the site, and I don't know if they were published elsewhere!), there were two books written for a charity (Comic Relief) by JK Rowling: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (with Harry's handwritten notes), and Quidditch Through the Ages. In Fantastic Beasts, mention is made of the Acromantula, a massive spider-like creature, with a note that rumours suggest there is an Acromantula colony in the north of Scotland. Harry's notes say that he and Ron confirmed this. Assuming that Aragog is the acromantula, it would seem to confirm, once and for all, that Hogwarts is in the north of Scotland.)
(Get the feeling that my friends and i actually sat down and worked it out?!)

Yikes! Sorry, didn't know twas going to be that long! :o

Einsteinsreject

Humphrey
2004-Jan-11, 05:44 AM
welcome to the board!!!

einsteinsreject
2004-Jan-11, 09:30 PM
lol, thanks! only just discovered the site and board, looks like the things i go on about all the time (i kinda like nitpicking everything!)

have to say, jk rowling including any astronomy in hp is quite amazing, but i thought she would know how bad the sky-watching is in scotland, since she lived/lives here! :roll:

ah well, guess we cant ask for miracles! (though i wont mention the time travel plot from hp & the prisoner of azkaban...! :wink: )

einsteinsreject

gethen
2004-Jan-11, 10:15 PM
lol, thanks! only just discovered the site and board, looks like the things i go on about all the time (i kinda like nitpicking everything!)

have to say, jk rowling including any astronomy in hp is quite amazing, but i thought she would know how bad the sky-watching is in scotland, since she lived/lives here! :roll:

ah well, guess we cant ask for miracles! (though i wont mention the time travel plot from hp & the prisoner of azkaban...! :wink: )

einsteinsreject

Ah, go ahead and mention it! This board thrives on that sort of thing. And welcome to the BABB!

Edymnion
2004-Jan-25, 02:50 AM
Harry has to take a load of exams, including Astronomy, during the summer term - though it's never made entirely clear why it's important for young witches and wizards to learn astronomy (from the point of view of their magical studies that is).Can't do Astrology if you don't have some basis in Astronomy. Gotta know what Saturn looks like before you can find it to tell what house its in.