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RickJ
2008-Feb-09, 06:02 PM
I took these back in 2006 and filed them under NGC 110 where they were lost until I started a massive clean-up of my hard drive. Since my processing skills have improved in those two years I reprocessed them. From the improvement I need to do that with a lot more of my early shots!

This is M110, a satellite dwarf elliptical galaxy orbiting M31. You can see a faint trail of stars from its lower end down to the lower left corner where they overlap the faint outer disk of stars from M31. These are not normally seen in wide angle photos of the galaxy as they are exceedingly faint. A small tidal arm going the right can be seen coming off the "top", north end of M110 as well. Note the reddish brown dust clouds near the core and how blue the core of this galaxy is. There must be some rather young stars in there showing elliptical galaxies aren't totally dead. At least not when big gravity source like M31 stirs things up in there.

The second image identifies some of globular clusters of the system. Which orbit M31 and which orbit M110, if any, I have no idea. They just look like stars to me rather than clusters of a million or so stars. The source I used to identify them is:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/ANDROMEDA_Atlas/Chart23.html
I had to blow it up to a larger scale as my eyes aren't what they used to be.

These are reduced (1.5" per pixel) and highly compressed for band width. The full size images at 1" of arc per pixel are at:
http://www.spacebanter.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=1677&d=1202540778
http://www.spacebanter.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=1678&d=1202540778

14" LX200R, L=4x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick

Dave Mitsky
2008-Feb-09, 06:23 PM
Excellent work, Rick!

paul f. campbell
2008-Feb-09, 06:41 PM
Hi Rick. Great Job. Glad to know I am not the only person who has lost photo files in there hard drive. Take care and clear skies to you Paul.

Palomar
2008-Feb-09, 07:08 PM
Nice! Thanks for sharing. :)

JAICOA
2008-Feb-09, 10:55 PM
Hi Rick, Another lost treasure. There obsulutely outstanding! Wow The galaxy itself is small yet clusters could be seen simply amazing. There keepers and thanks for the info on them. Clear Skies

RickJ
2008-Feb-10, 05:21 AM
Hi Rick. Great Job. Glad to know I am not the only person who has lost photo files in there hard drive. Take care and clear skies to you Paul.

Back in my film days I never lost an image. Then I lost them all when an ice storm felled a huge oak that took out the part of the house they were all stored in.

Waiting until I could restart with all digital gear I'd see posts of folks who found long lost digital images on their hard drives. I snickered at how careless they must be. Boy was I wrong! Glad I never said anything. It's all too easy. I've found 3 more; two labeled as NGC when they were under their M number, like M110 was and another I just filed under my BAD directory and it wasn't. Data was better than average in fact. I'll post them soon. Still need some work.

Rick

clop
2008-Feb-10, 05:28 AM
Very impressive Rick.

I'd be interested to see your original processed image, if you still have it, and also to hear about what you are doing differently now to get better processing. Maybe some tips we can all learn from?

clop

FriedPhoton
2008-Feb-10, 06:16 AM
Back in my film days I never lost an image. Then I lost them all when an ice storm felled a huge oak that took out the part of the house they were all stored in.

Waiting until I could restart with all digital gear I'd see posts of folks who found long lost digital images on their hard drives. I snickered at how careless they must be. Boy was I wrong! Glad I never said anything. It's all too easy.
Rick

I get around this problem by keeping year folders (i.e. 2006, 2007, 2008) and within those folders I dump my camera into sub-folders with the date of the dump (i.e 20080210). I started the practice of doing them year, month, day prior to moving them into year folders but I still think it's a good idea to name them that way. Anyway, I never toss an image even if it's a complete waste of disk space. Everything comes off the camera and goes into the folder. Then I write protect the folder so I don't accidentally mess up an original image if I do editing. When I edit, the result goes somewhere else entirely. I do not mix edits with originals.

Also, regular back-ups of all your images, despite the fact you may already have some sitting around, is not a bad idea. CDs and DVDs go bad so I don't trust them 100%. There are duplicates of everything somewhere. An off-site archive can't hurt either. For instance if you have a safe deposit box with extra room or a relative who can store them for you, you'll have everything even if your house is vaporized by aliens who fear you may have caught them in one of your pictures.

Personally, I could lose everything I own and I would mourn the loss of my computers and my ridiculously large collection of books, but I would be traumatized for life if I lost my images. If my place starts burning down, the one thing I'm grabbing is the nearest complete set of images (preferably the set on my laptop :) )

RickJ
2008-Feb-10, 07:17 AM
Actually, that's the same as I'm doing. I'm getting ready to move 2007 to the external drive. But if you misfile something like M110 filed as NGC110 then when you go to process it some time later (a trip to see the grandkids caused a 2 week gap and by then it was time to image not process so a month went by) you knew you took the image but can't find it. I need to also keep a log of the day an object was taken so I know where in the year to find it. I make one automatically but it picks up the file name which was NGC 110 so when I searched for M110 it wasn't found and I figured I only meant to take it. Going through file by file before moving to the external drives I found it. I took 403 objects in 2007, image or photometric data, (with 4 months lost to clouds) so that's a lot to keep track of under any filing system. Much of that is photometric data I do for a prof at McDonald's observatory. He monitors AGN from Hubble at IR and ultraviolet while a bunch of amateurs like me do the same in visible photometric bands. That data is supposedly separate from imaging data but sometimes I think I'm in the photometric directory when I'm really in the imaging one or visa versa. That's how some other image files were lost.

I now keep a complete backup copy in the safe deposit box so a fire or other disaster at the house can't wipe out the collection. Not just the final image but all data files, even really bad files that just might have something useful in the right circumstance. My data is up to 500G in only 2 years and growing rapidly though the last 6 months of clouds has put a serious damper on things. Nothing has ever been permanently lost on the hard drive but it has been lost for up to 2 years due to labeling or filing mistakes.

I'm only half way through 2007 so expect to find a few more and a review of 2006 turned up some as well (M110 for instance). Now if I never made any mistakes at 4 a.m. this might not be a problem. But I've been at this for over 50 years now (built my 6" f/12 in 1954) and I'm not all that sharp at 4 a.m. any more. Especially after 4 or 5 in a row.

Rick

winensky
2008-Feb-10, 09:04 AM
Thanks for the heads up on file management guys. I have only been at this for slightly over a year and my files are begining to look like a sucessful chaos model. Once again, fantastic work Rick.

Kind regards
Matt