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View Full Version : Korabl-Sputnik 4 or 5 transmissions from space?



ZappBrannigan
2003-Aug-19, 06:15 PM
I just finished the book "The Rocket Men" by Rex Hall and David J. Shayler. It's about the early Soviet space program.

It included this little wacky fun history bit, which I’ve paraphrased…

Korabl-Sputnik 4 and 5 were the last unmanned tests of the Vostok system. They wanted to include a taped message aboard the capsule to test the ground receiving stations. The KGB was nervous that if they simply used a tape of a human voice, the West might accuse them of flying a secret spy mission. So someone suggested a song instead. No, then the West might think that the cosmonaut had gone insane in orbit. So, they finally settled on choral music with someone reading Russian soup recipes over it.
This raises some very important questions:

1. Did the West pick up the signal?
2. Is there a recording of it on the web somewhere?
3. Was the U.S. able to reverse-engineer the soup recipes, and was this a decisive event in the Cold War?

Thanks,

-Ken.

ZappBrannigan
2003-Aug-20, 07:09 PM
Nobody knows this one? Darn! I was going to make space soup and drink Tang.

Senor Molinero
2003-Aug-21, 03:50 AM
Mmmmm......Tang (drool)

Pinemarten
2003-Aug-21, 10:37 PM
2. Is there a recording of it on the web somewhere?


Has anyone checked Google or Kazaa?

Charlie in Dayton
2003-Aug-22, 01:40 AM
It's not the one you were after, but you can get recordings of Sputnik 1, Explorer 1, Vanguard 1, and more at the AMSAT website (http://www.amsat.org/amsat/features/sounds/firstsat.html). I have a couple myself, of the replica Sputnik that was hand-launched from MIR a few years back. Neat stuff!

ZappBrannigan
2003-Aug-22, 01:54 AM
Wow! Sputnik 1! Hey, that's pretty cool. Takes my mind off of soup.

I did Google for the choral music, I but couldn't find it. Oh, well. I guess there are one or two bits of Human knowledge that aren't on the web.

Avatar28
2003-Aug-22, 09:43 PM
Nah, it's out there. You just can't find it. :-) *key x-files music*

Gambit
2003-Aug-23, 02:07 AM
We now call it Vanilla Coke.

Emspak
2003-Aug-25, 04:24 PM
I have found the man who got a hold of the secret soup recipes. He works in Manhattan. He went by the moniker "Soup Nazi."

While the general public thought this simply a clever play for a popular sit-com, it was actually a cover up for a secret program originally started after World War II. The Nazis had a secret soup recipe that might have won the war, providing extra nutrition and vitamins to troops attacking on the Eastern front. The original recipe was found when the Nazis, on a typical rampage through a Jewish town, wondered at the especially strong resistance to their troops. They found the reason: local families had come up with a winning formula. They forced te hapless maker of the recipe to work in a secret lab in eastern Germany.

But the Red Army captured it on their march to Berlin. Later, the scientist -- and uncle of the famed "Soup Nazi" was captured after his escape from a Russian prison. He had sneaked across the Czech Border into West Germany, where the CIA found him attempting to sell his recipes to several Bavarian beer halls.

After his de-briefing at a secret facility in Bonn, the original Soup Nazi was transported to Area 51 and engaged in a plan to adapt his soup recipes for American needs. Part of the problem was using borscht in one of the recipes. Most Americans are unfamiliar with the substance, and unless you live in Brighton beach it is unavailable in its pure form.

However, once obtained, it was found that excessive consumption of the toxic mixture of borscht and Campbell's cream of mushroom soup caused American GIs to develop a strong desire for vodka tonics. They also suddenly stopped drinking Pabst Blue Ribbon and Schlitz. The US Beer industry wouldn't stand for this, so they pressured the government to end the program or risk the economic collapse of states that were key to then-president Eisenhower's re-election -- Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin. (The later's governor threatened a cheese embargo, whcih would have crippled the Republican convention's plans for cheese and cracker snacks).

So the original Soup Nazi was sent to New York, and the CIA, not wanting to casually discard a prize fine, and wanting to keep an eye on him, set his first soup shop up in Brighton Beach. His nephew, wanting better digs, moved to Manhattan.

Proof of this tale is in a variety of places: for one, the soup kitchen was take-out only and not open weekends. How many stands in New York are not open weekends? ANd how is it that the health department never notices the extremely docile behavior of New Yorkers who sit there and get insulted? The only explanation is mind control!

snowcelt
2003-Aug-25, 06:35 PM
The final souplution.

Charlie in Dayton
2003-Aug-26, 12:35 AM
I have found the man who got a hold of the secret soup recipes. He works in Manhattan. He went by the moniker "Soup Nazi."

While the general public thought this simply a clever play for a popular sit-com, it was actually a cover up for a secret program originally started after World War II. The Nazis had a secret soup recipe that might have won the war, providing extra nutrition and vitamins to troops attacking on the Eastern front. The original recipe was found when the Nazis, on a typical rampage through a Jewish town, wondered at the especially strong resistance to their troops. They found the reason: local families had come up with a winning formula. They forced te hapless maker of the recipe to work in a secret lab in eastern Germany.

But the Red Army captured it on their march to Berlin. Later, the scientist -- and uncle of the famed "Soup Nazi" was captured after his escape from a Russian prison. He had sneaked across the Czech Border into West Germany, where the CIA found him attempting to sell his recipes to several Bavarian beer halls.

After his de-briefing at a secret facility in Bonn, the original Soup Nazi was transported to Area 51 and engaged in a plan to adapt his soup recipes for American needs. Part of the problem was using borscht in one of the recipes. Most Americans are unfamiliar with the substance, and unless you live in Brighton beach it is unavailable in its pure form.

However, once obtained, it was found that excessive consumption of the toxic mixture of borscht and Campbell's cream of mushroom soup caused American GIs to develop a strong desire for vodka tonics. They also suddenly stopped drinking Pabst Blue Ribbon and Schlitz. The US Beer industry wouldn't stand for this, so they pressured the government to end the program or risk the economic collapse of states that were key to then-president Eisenhower's re-election -- Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin. (The later's governor threatened a cheese embargo, whcih would have crippled the Republican convention's plans for cheese and cracker snacks).

So the original Soup Nazi was sent to New York, and the CIA, not wanting to casually discard a prize fine, and wanting to keep an eye on him, set his first soup shop up in Brighton Beach. His nephew, wanting better digs, moved to Manhattan.

Proof of this tale is in a variety of places: for one, the soup kitchen was take-out only and not open weekends. How many stands in New York are not open weekends? ANd how is it that the health department never notices the extremely docile behavior of New Yorkers who sit there and get insulted? The only explanation is mind control!

...brrrrring....brrrrring...Hello? UPS?...yeah, I've got a package here for pickup...when ya ship it, leave plenty of space around it for the air holes...uh huh...it's going COD to Wisconsin...addressee's named Lieder...I think we found a close relative...see ya when ya get here... 8-[