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View Full Version : "Listening" for Gravitational Waves to Track Down Black Holes



Fraser
2008-Feb-12, 05:00 AM
Gravitational waves are predicted by Einstein's 1916 general theory of relativity, but they are notoriously hard to detect and it's taken many decades to come close to observing them. Now, with the help of a supercomputer named SUGAR (Syracuse University Gravitational and Relativity Cluster), two years of data collected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/02/11/listening-for-gravitational-waves-to-track-down-black-holes/)

folkhemmet
2008-Feb-12, 10:55 AM
Questions...

Does this mean that we are getting close to the day when the direct detection of gravitational waves will be announced? Do astrophysicists expect that such a detection should have already occured?

Occams Ghost
2008-Feb-12, 02:38 PM
Yes... according to Einsteins papers, gravitational waves should permeate the universe... yet... strange enough is that we haven't even found one yet. Two colliding black holes should ripple both space and time, sending these waves out.

antoniseb
2008-Feb-12, 05:22 PM
yet... strange enough is that we haven't even found one yet. Two colliding black holes should ripple both space and time, sending these waves out.

How strong a signal do you think we should have seen?

In recorded history, we've never seen a Gravitational Wave... That's almost 4000 years of being here to detect them. Yes, lately we've developed more sensitive equipment than the great Pyramid of Cheops, but even so, it would take a whopper of a pair of black holes merging nearby in the last decade (from our point of observation) to have detected anything. We need to be using less primitive equipment.

Noclevername
2008-Feb-13, 01:20 AM
In recorded history, we've never seen a Gravitational Wave... That's almost 4000 years of being here to detect them. Yes, lately we've developed more sensitive equipment than the great Pyramid of Cheops, but even so, it would take a whopper of a pair of black holes merging nearby in the last decade (from our point of observation) to have detected anything. We need to be using less primitive equipment.

Quick, start building bigger pyramids! :D

Jerry
2008-Feb-15, 07:09 PM
Are modern pyramids less primitive than primitive pyramids?

Noclevername
2008-Feb-15, 08:31 PM
Are modern pyramids less primitive than primitive pyramids?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxor_Hotel

antoniseb
2008-Feb-15, 08:35 PM
Are modern pyramids less primitive than primitive pyramids?
I was thinking more of the 4000 year old sensing tools attached to the Pyramids. They were very poor at detecting Gravitational Waves.

Jerry
2008-Feb-22, 02:48 AM
So far, we haven't found any tools that do any better.

Anyone care to take a stab at the first paper explaining how Dark Matter and gravitational waves are coupled in a way that they cancel each other?