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View Full Version : Superfluidity! Harnessed for a u-no-what!



Fadingstar
2008-Feb-13, 10:54 PM
I've just watched a lecture by Joceyln Bell Burnell on Neutron stars. Very interesting it was too, but the thing that caught me was this state of superfluidity existing near the core of the star.
If this state of superfluidity could be created in a lab' (however unlikely), could it be used as the heart of an (walks into other room and says very quietly) over-unity device. (Waits for screams of outrage) :whistle:

I could conceive of it operating like a gyroscope with energy transferred onto some sort of coupled drive.

And, to a degree, considering the mass and spin of a Neutron star with this superfluid near the core whizzing around, does all this combined make a neutron star the equivalent of a u-no-what?

Would be interested to read what other people think about this.

Wasn't sure if this should be here on in the astronomy section so tossed a coin! :)

Noclevername
2008-Feb-14, 12:10 AM
Not really an "over-unity", just "energy-from-an-unusual-source", isn't it?

Van Rijn
2008-Feb-14, 12:18 AM
If this state of superfluidity could be created in a lab' (however unlikely),


It's been done with helium since 1937. See here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superfluid



could it be used as the heart of an (walks into other room and says very quietly) over-unity device. (Waits for screams of outrage) :whistle:

No, sorry. You don't get more energy out than you put in. No outrage required. :)

Fadingstar
2008-Feb-14, 12:42 AM
Thanks. It does do strange things! From the slowing of light to the Bose-Einstein condensate. I didn't realise you could get superfluidity without having to apply extreme pressures. You learn something everyday! :)

01101001
2008-Feb-14, 03:33 AM
It does do strange things!

It does normal things that you may categorize as strange relative to your everyday experience.

JustAFriend
2008-Feb-15, 01:42 AM
Somehow I think that if you have to re-create the conditions near the core of a neutron star,
the last thing you'd get would be 'extra energy'....

.... kinda like setting off some hydrogen bombs hoping that a match would spontaneously combust....

Stuart van Onselen
2008-Feb-16, 03:28 PM
Yeah, wasn't there just recently a thread where "those in the know" stated that if you could magically remove neutronium from the star that created it, it would explode violently enough to make a fusion bomb look like a party-cracker? :)

mugaliens
2008-Feb-18, 01:44 PM
It's been done with helium since 1937. See here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superfluid

No, sorry. You don't get more energy out than you put in. No outrage required. :)

Solidly agreed, but I do believe there remains some very interesting aspects/applications of superfluidity to be discovered.