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bup
2002-Mar-11, 07:18 PM
From <a href=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0439148790/qid=1015881044/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-8672034-8871342>"Can You Hear A Shout in Space?"</a>:

Q: What's the most famous satellite?

A: The Hubble Space Telescope.

Granted, this isn't as egregious as most astronomical errors, but unless you say 'artificial,' shouldn't the answer be the moon?

MHS
2002-Mar-11, 08:26 PM
And besides that; IS HST the most famous (articifial) satellite? To be honest: when I hear satellite I think Sputnik. Dunno why... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Donnie B.
2002-Mar-11, 11:05 PM
On 2002-03-11 15:26, MHS wrote:
And besides that; IS HST the most famous (articifial) satellite? To be honest: when I hear satellite I think Sputnik. Dunno why... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif


Hmmm... showing your age? (and mine) /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Maybe the most famous artificial satellite still in orbit?

MHS
2002-Mar-12, 05:32 AM
On 2002-03-11 18:05, Donnie B. wrote:

Hmmm... showing your age? (and mine) /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif



No, I'm 18. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

David Hall
2002-Mar-12, 10:57 AM
Up to the last decade, the answer would have undoubtedly been Sputnik. Heck, it's probably the only satellite most people could name.

But now with the Hubble telescope being in the news all the time, not to in mention movies and TV (Let's use the Hubble!), it certainly has totally eclipsed Sputnik in the minds of the people. Especially since quite a few of us are nowhere near old enough to remember the early space race anyway.

All the beayoootiful Hubble photographs haven't hurt it's notoriety either. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

David Hall
2002-Mar-12, 11:00 AM
On another point, the question is really not all that good in the first place. A phrase like "most famous" is very subjective and depends an awful lot on what areas you are looking at, how you arrive at the measurement of fame, and just what the heck you mean by "famous" anyway.

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Mar-12, 11:59 AM
On 2002-03-12 05:57, David Hall wrote:
Up to the last decade, the answer would have undoubtedly been Sputnik. Heck, it's probably the only satellite most people could name.
I dunno, at various times since Sputnik, it might have been Telstar, Mercury, Gemini, Comsat, Spacelab, or Mir. Whichever was in the news at the time.

Wiley
2002-Mar-12, 03:41 PM
On 2002-03-12 06:59, GrapesOfWrath wrote:
I dunno, at various times since Sputnik, it might have been Telstar, Mercury, Gemini, Comsat, Spacelab, or Mir. Whichever was in the news at the time.


Spacelab? Don't you mean Skylab? I thought Spacelab was a shuttle thingie.

Wiley
2002-Mar-12, 03:42 PM
On 2002-03-12 00:32, MHS wrote:


On 2002-03-11 18:05, Donnie B. wrote:

Hmmm... showing your age? (and mine) /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif



No, I'm 18. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif


Whippersnapper! Respect your elders! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Mar-12, 05:20 PM
On 2002-03-12 10:41, Wiley wrote:
Spacelab? Don't you mean Skylab?
Yep. Musta been thinking of Spaceballs.

Azpod
2002-Mar-12, 06:32 PM
No, I think the most famous satellite is the Death Star from Star Wars, especially since the question nevert said it had to be a REAL satellite. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

odysseus0101
2002-Mar-12, 06:38 PM
On 2002-03-12 13:32, Azpod wrote:
No, I think the most famous satellite is the Death Star from Star Wars, especially since the question nevert said it had to be a REAL satellite. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif


That would probably have to be the 2nd Death Star, because it was being constructed in orbit around Endor. The 1st DS didn't even make one complete orbit around Yavin.

aurorae
2002-Mar-12, 07:38 PM
On 2002-03-12 06:59, GrapesOfWrath wrote:


On 2002-03-12 05:57, David Hall wrote:
Up to the last decade, the answer would have undoubtedly been Sputnik. Heck, it's probably the only satellite most people could name.
I dunno, at various times since Sputnik, it might have been Telstar, Mercury, Gemini, Comsat, Spacelab, or Mir. Whichever was in the news at the time.


Voyager.

Galileo.

NEAR.

Hopefully, in a couple of years, Casini.

Simon
2002-Mar-13, 08:48 AM
Technically, the Voyagers aren't sattilites 'cause they aren't orbiting anything, just whizzing out in to space.

But since the question never said "most famous sattilite ORBITING EARTH" I guess the rest of them count. I still think of Hubble first though.

kucharek
2002-Mar-13, 10:16 AM
On 2002-03-13 03:48, Simon wrote:
Technically, the Voyagers aren't sattilites 'cause they aren't orbiting anything, just whizzing out in to space.


But since the question never said "most famous sattilite ORBITING EARTH" I guess the rest of them count. I still think of Hubble first though.

Maybe they orbit the center of our galaxy?

ChallegedChimp
2002-Mar-13, 12:13 PM
(subjective mode)

Most famous satellite of the Earth? The sun of of course (whoops...geocentrism getting in they way) /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Moon obviously, but manmade? Gotta be Sputnik. He who is first is first, Those thereafter are not first.
Name the third man on the moon offhand. (nope, not going to give yah Buzz Aldrin since he was with Armstrong...and gosh do I hope my memory is right on who was second)
/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif
/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif
(not easy being a dumb monkey)

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ChallegedChimp on 2002-03-13 07:14 ]</font>

ToSeek
2002-Mar-13, 02:14 PM
On 2002-03-13 07:13, ChallegedChimp wrote:

Name the third man on the moon offhand.
.
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Pete Conrad: (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a12/a12peteinred.jpg) "Whoopie! Man, that may have been a small one for Neil, but that's a long one for me."

(edited to add portrait link)
_________________
"... to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." - Tennyson, Ulysses

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ToSeek on 2002-03-13 09:16 ]</font>

SpacedOut
2002-Mar-13, 06:59 PM
Very cool portrait of Pete definitely fits his image!

ToSeek
2002-Mar-13, 08:04 PM
On 2002-03-13 13:59, SpacedOut wrote:
Very cool portrait of Pete definitely fits his image!


I thought people might like that, which is why I edited my post to add it.

ChallegedChimp
2002-Mar-14, 12:27 PM
Erk!

Shoulda known one of the Bad PhD woulda nailed me.

And love the great quote of Pete's (may God rest his soul).

The guy was one extraordinary pice of work and should have (IMO) been first.
Great guy and one who will be missed.

(BTW, loved the pic, it dang sure suits his style)

AnythingDragon
2002-Mar-17, 12:26 AM
And besides that; IS HST the most famous (articifial) satellite? To be honest: when I hear satellite I think Sputnik. Dunno why...

Probably because Sputnik means satellite in Russian?

David Hall
2002-Mar-17, 01:12 AM
On 2002-03-16 19:26, AnythingDragon wrote:
And besides that; IS HST the most famous (articifial) satellite?

Well, as I said before, it depends on how you define and measure "famous".

For example, what answer would you get if you surveyed 1000 people and asked them the name of the first satellite they came to mind? Then the answer would probably vary by the type of person, area, recent news stories involving satellites, etc. Older people might be more inclined to say Sputnik or Telsat, younger ones maybe Hubble or MIR. Who knows if Hubble would be first on this one.

But if instead you asked those thousand people to make a list of 10 famous satellites, then compared them to see which ones came up most often, I'd bet you'd find Hubble at or near the top.

"Famous" is a very subjective idea, and so I think this question is not a very appropriate one.

However, I still think that if you ask the average person (not the kind you find on boards like this /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif ), They are currently more likely to say Hubble than anything else, simply because it's been in the news and other media more than any other satellite in the last decade.

2002-Mar-18, 12:59 PM
? the top `lite?
[x] the one that spins the fastest?
reallly i do not know the answer
i `poise it well could be `Earth `er self
maybe theres a fast turning Moon out there
though.. and as for man made
.
.
well never mind tiny craters anyway
6.0 1 million tons Double Spring Flat, NV Quake, 1994
6.5 5 million tons Northridge, CA Quake, 1994
7.0 32 million tons Hyogo-Ken Nanbu, Japan Quake, 1995
start counting at 100,000 Kt or after 8.

mallen
2002-Mar-25, 01:25 AM
What about the ISS? That one is pretty popular. I'm surprised nobody mentioned it yet.

Though, I definitely agree the moon is clearly the most popular if you don't restrict yourself to artificial ones.

BTW... this conversation reminds me of one of my favorite questions to ask my students...

Q: What is the closest planet (to you)?

A: Earth. (Most of them debate between Venus and Mars).

mickal555
2004-Oct-21, 10:45 AM
What about the ISS? That one is pretty popular. I'm surprised nobody mentioned it yet.

Though, I definitely agree the moon is clearly the most popular if you don't restrict yourself to artificial ones.

BTW... this conversation reminds me of one of my favorite questions to ask my students...

Q: What is the closest planet (to you)?

A: Earth. (Most of them debate between Venus and Mars).

Yeah..... a bit like the ol closest star to earth? alph centori no, proxima centori no, ohhh the sun!!!! lucky you get three gueses.

2004-Oct-21, 02:39 PM
[quote]
On 2002-03-16 19:26, Any TIME wrote:
say Sputnik

2004-Oct-21, 02:42 PM
? the top `lite?
[x] the one that spins the fastest?
reallly i do not know the answer
i `poise it well could be `Earth `er self
maybe theres a fast turning Moon out there
though.. and as for man made
.
.
well never mind tiny craters anyway
6.0 1 million tons Double Spring Flat, NV Quake, 1994
6.5 5 million tons Northridge, CA Quake, 1994
7.0 32 million tons Hyogo-Ken Nanbu, Japan Quake, 1995
start counting at 100,000 Kt or after 8.
I do :" NOT ": REMember saying this
however in the last 24 hours {maybe} there was a 4.0 "off" the
?:" Coast of Oregon ":? {BWUW}

AGN Fuel
2004-Oct-22, 12:15 AM
Pete Conrad: (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a12/a12peteinred.jpg) "Whoopie! Man, that may have been a small one for Neil, but that's a long one for me."



Hey ToSeek,

Do you have the link to the series of humorous astronaut photos that appeared in one of the Lunar Conspiracy threads? I once had it saved as a favourite, but I can't seem to find it now...

Jpax2003
2004-Oct-22, 03:34 AM
Isn't Earth the most famouse satellite? Or maybe even the sun itself (galacto-centric).

I think if you ask a bunch of kids to name the most famous satallite you are likely to get Sirius radio or XM Radio sats or DirecTV on your list.

ToSeek
2004-Oct-22, 01:31 PM
Pete Conrad: (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a12/a12peteinred.jpg) "Whoopie! Man, that may have been a small one for Neil, but that's a long one for me."



Hey ToSeek,

Do you have the link to the series of humorous astronaut photos that appeared in one of the Lunar Conspiracy threads? I once had it saved as a favourite, but I can't seem to find it now...

Is this what you're looking for?:

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/alsj.funpix.html

Wally
2004-Oct-22, 07:16 PM
Technically, the Voyagers aren't sattilites 'cause they aren't orbiting anything, just whizzing out in to space.



Is this accurate? Technically, aren't both the V-gers still in an extremely elliptical orbit of the sun?

ToSeek
2004-Oct-22, 08:05 PM
Technically, the Voyagers aren't sattilites 'cause they aren't orbiting anything, just whizzing out in to space.



Is this accurate? Technically, aren't both the V-gers still in an extremely elliptical orbit of the sun?

No, they have hyperbolic trajectories since they've achieved escape velocity.

Jpax2003
2004-Oct-23, 04:23 AM
Technically, the Voyagers aren't sattilites 'cause they aren't orbiting anything, just whizzing out in to space.



Is this accurate? Technically, aren't both the V-gers still in an extremely elliptical orbit of the sun?

No, they have hyperbolic trajectories since they've achieved escape velocity.but they are probably satellites of the Milky Way. Or have they achieved galactic escape velocity (500 kpm)?

AGN Fuel
2004-Oct-23, 01:22 PM
Hey ToSeek,

Do you have the link to the series of humorous astronaut photos that appeared in one of the Lunar Conspiracy threads? I once had it saved as a favourite, but I can't seem to find it now...

Is this what you're looking for?:

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/alsj.funpix.html

Hmm, no. There's some good stuff there, but not the collection I was looking for. I had in the back of my mind that it was listed as rebuttal to one of the Ong threads where he was complaining that the astronauts should be too serious to be seen enjoying themselves, but I dredged right through that thread and couldn't see it.

From memory, it included a crew in mock prayer around a model of the CM, several Pete Conrad shots with arrows through his head, etc, and so on. Dag nabbit! What did I do with that link! #-o

Robert Andersson
2004-Oct-23, 02:30 PM
About Hubble, even though many may recognize the name and what it is (a space telescope), I'm not that sure that the average person knows it is a satellite. :roll:

Sigma_Orionis
2004-Oct-23, 05:15 PM
Too bad Vanguard I is not a famous satellite, it will probably stay in orbit for a couple of hundred years.....