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Fraser
2008-Feb-26, 09:10 PM
When researchers examine meteorites, they often find them sprinkled with teeny tiny diamonds - 25,000 times smaller than a grain of sand. In fact, these nanodiamonds make up 3% of the carbon found in meteorites. Astronomers think diamonds might actually be common out there in the Universe, and they've developed a new technique to find [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/02/26/new-technique-for-finding-space-diamonds/)

Trocisp
2008-Feb-26, 09:12 PM
I can't wait until we find a diamond the mass of the moon like in Space Odyssey... then I won't have to spend a ton of cash on a stupid engagement ring. :p

Noclevername
2008-Feb-26, 11:40 PM
I can't wait until we find a diamond the mass of the moon like in Space Odyssey... then I won't have to spend a ton of cash on a stupid engagement ring. :p

By then it'll probably be far cheaper to make them sythetically by electrical deposition, and they'll lose their status as "gemstones" and just become common building materials, like aluminum (which was also once a valued precious metal).

trinitree88
2008-Feb-26, 11:58 PM
I can't wait until we find a diamond the mass of the moon like in Space Odyssey... then I won't have to spend a ton of cash on a stupid engagement ring. :p

Trocrisp. If you tell your girlfriend you think the engagement ring is stupid.....you can probably save all of the cash you would have spent....:think:

As for Fraser's original post. They find buckyballs in space, carbon nanotubes, graphite whiskers, soot,diamonds....pretty much the whole genre of carbon allotropes.

01101001
2008-Feb-27, 01:58 AM
I can't wait until we find a diamond the mass of the moon like in Space Odyssey...

Old news, BBC: Diamond star thrills astronomers (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3492919.stm)


Twinkling in the sky is a diamond star of 10 billion trillion trillion carats, astronomers have discovered.

The cosmic diamond is a chunk of crystallised carbon, 4,000 km across, some 50 light-years from the Earth in the constellation Centaurus.

It's the compressed heart of an old star that was once bright like our Sun but has since faded and shrunk.

trinitree88
2008-Feb-28, 12:07 PM
Old news, BBC: Diamond star thrills astronomers (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3492919.stm)

01101001;1183581 Interesting. Perhaps that's the source of the nanodiamonds found in meteorites. That which is not forbidden in physics must occur....a collision between two of these babies should not only coalesce part of the matter...it should spew huge quantities of debris. If there's a limited supply of oxygen available....then the cooling vapor should reform as microscopic diamond, just like the vapor deposition films used on machine tools. Interesting. pete

WalrusLike
2008-Feb-28, 12:29 PM
I can't wait until we find a diamond the mass of the moon... then I won't have to spend a ton of cash...

I know your just joshing.... but have you considered telling her that diamonds are not all that rare even here on earth? Its only DeBeers and others hoarding them to keep the price up, that stops them being common as dirt...(well not quite)

Good luck with that.... its not a line that's ever been successful before... it would be nice to see it succeed even once.

Anyone
2008-Feb-29, 07:24 AM
That would be good if they were able to collect the diamonds that it was as common as dirt