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Doodler
2008-Feb-27, 01:12 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/27/planets.mnemonic.ap/index.html

Nice work, kiddo, my day is complete.



Maryn Smith, the winner of the National Geographic planetary mnemonic contest, has created a handy way to remember the planets and their order in distance from the sun.

Her award-winning phrase is: My Very Exciting Magic Carpet Just Sailed Under Nine Palace Elephants.

The 11 recognized planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto and Eris.

Ceres, Pluto and Eris are considered dwarf planets.


To rob a beautiful image from JMS, may this stand as a middle finger 50 feet tall made of red neon to burn in the night for all eternity at the IAU for its backhanded manipulation of planetary science.

Hornblower
2008-Feb-27, 01:20 PM
I would have to use the list of planet names, which I learned by rote on my own as a child, as a mnemonic in any attempt to memorize a newly composed string of words that was intended as a mnemonic.

hhEb09'1
2008-Feb-27, 01:23 PM
:)

My Variable Elevation Magic Carpet Just Sailed Under Nervous Palace Elephants

Celestial Mechanic
2008-Feb-27, 01:43 PM
I still prefer "Mother Very Easily Made A Jelly Sandwich Using No Ketchup, Eggs, Bacon Or Cheese", (inspired by a similar mnemonic in Robert Anton Wilson's Schroedinger's Cat trilogy).

The "A" is for asteroids (all of them), "Ketchup, Eggs, Bacon" for Kuiper-Edgeworth Belt, and "Or Cheese" for Oort Cloud.

Swift
2008-Feb-27, 01:47 PM
Her award-winning phrase is: My Very Exciting Magic Carpet Just Sailed Under Nine Palace Elephants.

The 11 recognized planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto and Eris.

Just proves, once again, that its elephants all the way down. ;)

AndreasJ
2008-Feb-27, 05:32 PM
If they're including dwarf planets as "planets", why aren't they including minor planets too? They're being sizistic! :mad:

KaiYeves
2008-Feb-27, 08:48 PM
I learned the mnemonic Many Very Early Mornings Justin Skated Upon Ned's Pond. So, when I heard The News, I went "Skated Upon... Ned? Ouch."
Being of quick wit, I said two seconds later "Politely, Everyone Quickly Sued" for Pluto, Eris, Quoar, Sedna.

Trocisp
2008-Feb-27, 08:57 PM
I learned "My very educated mother just sat upon nine pizzas."

Now I go... "Google.com!"

Extravoice
2008-Feb-27, 09:13 PM
"My very educated mother just served us nine prunes."

Sadly, no more prunes for us. :naughty:

George
2008-Feb-27, 09:42 PM
My Very Earnest Mother Calls Just So George Names Planets Effectively. ;)

Trocisp
2008-Feb-27, 10:01 PM
I still think that the moon should get to be a planet if mercury does... think of how complex the pnemonic would be then!

George
2008-Feb-27, 10:25 PM
If you want complex, just wait a few years when the Kuiper Belt reveals dozens of more dwarf planets. I saw one estimate suggesting that there might be over 200 dwarf planets awaiting us.

Ara Pacis
2008-Feb-27, 11:09 PM
Burn, Neon, Burn.

CuddlySkyGazer
2008-Feb-28, 01:42 PM
The 11 recognized planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto and Eris.
Which is wrong, as there are only eight recognised planets in the Solar System - Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune!

dgavin
2008-Feb-28, 03:43 PM
Which is wrong, as there are only eight recognised planets in the Solar System - Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune!

I hate to be the one to say I told people so. But I told people so.

Having Pluto recognized as a planet for so long had already set the definition of what a planet was. The new IAU definition is simply being ignored in preference to something that makes more sense to the common folks.

I think I even mentioned the ignoring of it was going to happen in the debate threads long ago.

:doh:

laurele
2008-Feb-28, 06:06 PM
I hate to be the one to say I told people so. But I told people so.

Having Pluto recognized as a planet for so long had already set the definition of what a planet was. The new IAU definition is simply being ignored in preference to something that makes more sense to the common folks.

I think I even mentioned the ignoring of it was going to happen in the debate threads long ago.

:doh:

One of the reasons the IAU definition is being ignored is that it simply makes no sense, specifically in the claim that "dwarf planets" are not planets at all. I hope the IAU will revise its definition in 2009 to incorporate "dwarf planets" as a subcategory of the broader term planets. That seems like a compromise that could satisfy both dynamicists and planetary scientists.

And this time, they should allow electronic voting to include the other 96 percent of IAU members who were not present and could not vote in 2006.

crosscountry
2008-Feb-28, 06:27 PM
I would have to use the list of planet names, which I learned by rote on my own as a child, as a mnemonic in any attempt to memorize a newly composed string of words that was intended as a mnemonic.

haha, me too!

I just learned the planet names. Saves time:lol:

Ara Pacis
2008-Feb-28, 06:34 PM
haha, me too!

I just learned the planet names. Saves time:lol:

It's not just about their names, but a preferred ordering.

tracer
2008-Feb-28, 08:03 PM
Waaaaaaaait a minute ...

Ceres is a dwarf planet, but Vesta isn't?!

AndreasJ
2008-Feb-28, 08:16 PM
One of the reasons the IAU definition is being ignored is that it simply makes no sense, specifically in the claim that "dwarf planets" are not planets at all.
I'll agree that "dwarf planet" is a bad name, but "minor planet" is just as bad, and nobody complains about that. The old state of affairs was no better on this particular score.

tracer
2008-Feb-28, 09:50 PM
And don't get me started on the ridiculous term "Planetery Nebula".

crosscountry
2008-Feb-29, 04:45 AM
It's not just about their names, but a preferred ordering.


no problems here. But I study them.

Lord Jubjub
2009-Dec-22, 12:37 AM
Waaaaaaaait a minute ...

Ceres is a dwarf planet, but Vesta isn't?!

Vesta isn't round enough.

Bynaus
2009-Dec-22, 11:13 AM
But what about Haumea, Makemake, Sedna, Orcus, 2002TC302, Quaoar and 2007OR10? They are all larger than Ceres, and - as they fit the definition - sooner or later, will be "officialy" recognized by the IAU as dwarf planets. Where do they figure in the mnemonic? I hope you see the problem.

AndreasJ
2009-Dec-22, 11:26 AM
Holy necromancy batman!

We'll just keep calling Ceres an asteroid and the various trans-Neptuninas KBO's, ice dwarves, plutoids, etc, and eventually the label of "dwarf planet" will be forgotten. Children will be taught in school there are eight planets, and the planetary status of Pluto will be as forgotten as Vesta's.

Swift
2009-Dec-22, 01:48 PM
Maybe we could come up with a mnemonic where the regular planets are capital letters and the dwarf planets are small letters?

Bynaus
2009-Dec-22, 02:13 PM
And then add a few small-lettered words every few years?

dgavin
2009-Dec-22, 07:41 PM
My opinion is and always will be that Belt Planet sould replace the term Dwarf Planet, for two very good resons.

The IAU had the right definition for it; objects that haven't cleared thier orbits of other objects (or belong to a class of similar object), but they used a name that implies smallness, when it may very well be likely that a mars sizes planet might eventually be discovered in the Kruiper Belt or Oort Cloud.

Pluto/Charon should have had it's own status as a "Double Belt Planet", with two moons. Then our solar system would be defined as 8 Planets, 1 Double Planet, and x numebr of other Belt Planets.

That really my beef with the IAU decistion, is 1, the name, and two, they tossed out the Double Planet classification.

*edit to add* This would be a lot more accpetable to most then just no longer including Pluto as a planet.

Bynaus
2009-Dec-23, 07:46 AM
My opinion is and always will be that Belt Planet sould replace the term Dwarf Planet, for two very good resons.

Belt Planet sounds fine, and may be even preferable to the diminutive "Dwarf Planet". If we ever find a detached large planet far outside the Kuiper belt in an inclined orbit (like, say, a lost "Neptune"), we could call it a Halo Planet.

But then, the "sphericality" criterion is very vague. Vesta is quite round, so is Pallas. How do you determine how round an object has to be to qualify as "planet"?

I would have preferred to call all things that fullfill all the three following planet criterions (1. no fusion, but spherical 2. orbits a star 3. gravitationally dominant object on its orbit = more massive than everything else within 3 Hill radii taken together) "Planets", all that meet the first two "Planetoids", and all objects that meet only the first criterion "Planemos" (for planetary mass object).

crosscountry
2009-Dec-23, 03:16 PM
I wish they used my definition too