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View Full Version : A One-Way, One-Person Mission to Mars



Fraser
2008-Mar-04, 06:50 PM
Will humans ever really go to Mars? Letís face it, the obstacles are quite daunting. Not only are there numerous, difficult, technical issues to overcome, but the political will and perseverance of any one nation to undertake such an arduous task just canít be counted on. However, one former NASA [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/03/04/a-one-way-one-person-mission-to-mars/)

Trocisp
2008-Mar-04, 07:02 PM
I, personally, have no problem with a 1 way ticket. As long as the astronaut is informed about the situation.

Hell, I want to go. I have a decent job and a nice life... but the chance to really see another planet? I'd give it all up in a heartbeat.

Not to mention, you'd probably the most famous person to live.

ever.

ever.

ever.

ever.

ever.

peteshimmon
2008-Mar-04, 07:10 PM
What are they asking for, volunteers or
nominations?

Fadingstar
2008-Mar-04, 07:17 PM
How would you deal with the isolation after a few years? This to me seems the main problem of such a proposal. Initially you would have the novelty of it, but what about when you've been there say 5-10 years. Once you've seen one red landscape...
I can't help but think of Tom Hanks in Cast Away. (You may take your own volleyball but the name Wilson is optional).

Ronald Brak
2008-Mar-05, 12:51 AM
The article says the U.S. is a risk adverse society? HA! If you haven't noticed there is a trillion dollar financial crisis going on because Americans weren't too concerned about risk. I was going to include a long list of risky things the U.S. has done and is doing, but then this post would derail into an arguement about the list. While you can argue that you think the U.S. should be less risk adverse in some areas, saying the U.S. is a risk adverse country doesn't seem true in comparison to other developed nations.

Trocisp
2008-Mar-05, 01:08 AM
How would you deal with the isolation after a few years? This to me seems the main problem of such a proposal. Initially you would have the novelty of it, but what about when you've been there say 5-10 years. Once you've seen one red landscape...
I can't help but think of Tom Hanks in Cast Away. (You may take your own volleyball but the name Wilson is optional).I've never been much of a social person in the first place, often shirking social interaction in favor of scientific studies and reading.

As long as I've got a reliable source of energy and a connection to the latest crappy Earth TV Sitcoms and scientific research, I'd be happy. :D

Fadingstar
2008-Mar-05, 01:56 AM
I've never been much of a social person in the first place, often shirking social interaction in favor of scientific studies and reading.

As long as I've got a reliable source of energy and a connection to the latest crappy Earth TV Sitcoms and scientific research, I'd be happy. :D

:lol:

I think we should call this 'Martian Planet Disks'.

Please list the ten things you would take with you on your one-way trip to Mars - assuming power/tent/air etc is supplied.

Trocisp
2008-Mar-05, 04:10 AM
:lol:

I think we should call this 'Martian Planet Disks'.

Please list the ten things you would take with you on your one-way trip to Mars - assuming power/tent/air etc is supplied.Are we talking currently existing technology or on-the-drawing-board technology?

V_Zhd
2008-Mar-05, 06:05 AM
I think the one-way trip idea would work, but there would be less problems if there were more passengers (at least 3-4). There is too high of a risk of something happening to a lone explorer. Of course, a larger group would put more lives at risk, but it would make the mission much more resilient.

I would still prefer a round trip just because I don't see a reason for anyone to stay for an extended time on Mars (at least for now). You would need to bring tons of supplies and research equipment, unless you don't expect to survive too long (which would make the mission quite pointless)!

zerocold
2008-Mar-05, 06:35 AM
pathetic!!, 1 way mission?..really guys...u gonna miss ur mother earth when u have landed over a boring red desert, only to perform nice photos or experiments..and without sex!!! :D, guys are u so desperate to reach that insipid rock to sacrifice a human live ?-the guy that will travel must be a mindless zealot-

send a monkey or a dog, lol

i wouldnt change my green/blue home for anything, just cant..CANT believe that such idea was proposed

the dumbest idea EVER

JonClarke
2008-Mar-05, 08:07 AM
pathetic!!, 1 way mission?..really guys...u gonna miss ur mother earth when u have landed over a boring red desert, only to perform nice photos or experiments..and without sex!!! :D, guys are u so desperate to reach that insipid rock to sacrifice a human live ?-the guy that will travel must be a mindless zealot-

Think of it as a thought experiment, like Schrondinger's cat


i wouldnt change my green/blue home for anything

Just because you don't want to go elsewhere does not mean to say that nobody else does.


just cant..CANT believe that such idea was proposed

It was proposed in the OP, so you had better believe it.


the dumbest idea EVER

I thought that was mining the Moon for "helium 5"

Jon

Noclevername
2008-Mar-05, 08:33 AM
I doubt he would remain alone for life, as others will also be going to Mars once it's proved plausible.

Ronald Brak
2008-Mar-05, 11:43 AM
Well, you could certainly afford to save a lot more than one life on earth with the money you would save from not bringing the astronaut back from mars. This was true of Apollo too, but it was never seriously considered. Actually, you could save lives by not returning the people in the ISS to earth. Of course, once you start making routine missions one way, you're going to have a hard time finding quality recruits for your astronaut corps, but you'll probably still have plenty of volunteers.

Fadingstar
2008-Mar-05, 02:24 PM
Are we talking currently existing technology or on-the-drawing-board technology?

Assume commercial technology wouldn't have change that much when you go, and NASA supplies you with everything you need to survive on Mars.
So what would you take for entertainment, or perhaps, for sentimental reasons?
Weight load and size would no doubt be a factor, so you would have to bear that in mind. The technology to download stuff is proven so things like ipods etc would make sense.
The biggest flaw I can see to the reality of such a thing - if you can cope with the isolation - would be if you became seriously ill or had a nasty accident. No Martian hospitals yet!
But, as posted by Jon, think of it as a thought experiment.
I wouldn't go, though the idea is tempting - no taxes for a start!

So, ten personal items you would take with you.

zerocold
2008-Mar-05, 03:39 PM
i would accept a one-way mission if mars would be something like earth, but guess what? isnt....

where is the point to send ppl -and specially in one way- to mars? that poor ******* will feel greatness the first day..but afer one month over martian soil he will feel miserable

heck...even exploiting helium 5 is better idea! ;)

manceya
2008-Mar-05, 04:25 PM
Great idea! Just think how many volunteers give their lives in wars with so little result... no hesitation then.
I am sure other countries will do it if the US does not.

AM

Trocisp
2008-Mar-05, 05:09 PM
pathetic!!, 1 way mission?..really guys...u gonna miss ur mother earth when u have landed over a boring red desert, only to perform nice photos or experiments..and without sex!!! :D, guys are u so desperate to reach that insipid rock to sacrifice a human live ?-the guy that will travel must be a mindless zealot-I'm not a mindless zealot, and I'd willingly do it.

If for no other reason than to contribute to the world my successors will inhabit. Every little bit of knowledge gained would be years ahead of its time (assuming that otherwise the mission would take decades to do), and that could do everything from save lives to hasten the full collonization of mars, allowing for more living space and less territorial wars.


send a monkey or a dog, lolHow do you propose to have a dog or a monkey feed itself on the journey there? Or have them troubleshoot if any minor problems arise? (Major problems would likely result in a Critical Failure of the mission, anyway)


i wouldnt change my green/blue home for anything, just cant..CANT believe that such idea was proposedYes, and you might not wish to move to another country, but there are plenty of people who do.


the dumbest idea EVERProbably akin to sending a man to the moon. COMPLETELY IMPOSSIBLE!

Trocisp
2008-Mar-05, 05:15 PM
Assume commercial technology wouldn't have change that much when you go, and NASA supplies you with everything you need to survive on Mars.
So what would you take for entertainment, or perhaps, for sentimental reasons?
Weight load and size would no doubt be a factor, so you would have to bear that in mind. The technology to download stuff is proven so things like ipods etc would make sense.
The biggest flaw I can see to the reality of such a thing - if you can cope with the isolation - would be if you became seriously ill or had a nasty accident. No Martian hospitals yet!
But, as posted by Jon, think of it as a thought experiment.
I wouldn't go, though the idea is tempting - no taxes for a start!

So, ten personal items you would take with you.What would I take with me?

The absolute most modern technology, in redundancy. I'd take the most modern computers, and that would really be it. Anything sentimental I'd bring would likely be pictures, and I could bring those in data-form easier than I could in physical form. It might cost a dollar to bring an 8x11 photograph into orbit, where electrons on an HDD are free if you're already bringing the HDD with you.

A big comfy chair, and super comfy bed would be requirements, and other than that... I can't think of anything.

zerocold
2008-Mar-05, 05:32 PM
well sending the man to the moon was one of the dumbest ideas ever...no practical use, but it was needed, the soviet union won to the US the first satelite, space station, man on space....so it was a political success, but not a scientific one...now all the scientific/politic community agree that space station, sattelites and men/women on orbit are important... but not the moon

the shuttle is on the second place of dumbest ideas ;)

about the original topic, i dont believe on that "get the job done" is better than the US modern way...military minded pilots wont help on a scientific/engineer field like the space exploration

JonClarke
2008-Mar-09, 06:36 AM
well sending the man to the moon was one of the dumbest ideas ever...no practical use,

So only the obtaining of practical knowledge is not dumb? So the fact that Apollo revolutionised our understanding of the history of the Earth, Moon, and solar system is of no value to you.




Not a scientific success? So when scientists write books like "Planetary Science: a Lunar perspective (based heavily on Apollo data), "Lunar Science - a post Apollo view", they are lying? Is this http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/top10sci.htm of the top 10 discoveries of the Apollo program a lie?

[QUOTE=zerocold;1189914]now all the scientific/politic community agree that space station, sattelites and men/women on orbit are important... but not the moon

All the scientific community agree that the Moon is not important? Then why are teir annual conferences on lunar science? Why are scientists working on new lunar missions? Why are they so keen to get samples from previously unvisitbed parts of the Moon?



military minded pilots wont help on a scientific/engineer field like the space exploration

Which is why very few astronauts and cosmonauts are from test pilot backgrounds these days, most are scientists/engineers by training.

Jon

Noclevername
2008-Mar-09, 07:11 AM
...no practical use, but it was needed,
Well, if it was needed, then it did have a practical use, now didn't it?


...now all the scientific/politic community agree that space station, sattelites and men/women on orbit are important... but not the moon
Er, no. The politicians in charge of NASA decided-- for a while-- that the space situation didn't warrant Moon landings. Then they decided that the situation had changed enough that now it does. The scientific community was not given a vote in the matter either way.


about the original topic, i dont believe on that "get the job done" is better than the US modern way...

What, exactly, do you see as the "US modern way?"

Ilya
2008-Mar-10, 12:28 PM
Apparently, first woman to fly in space (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tereshkova) agrees:



Tereshkova was invited to President Vladimir Putin's residence in Novo-Ogaryovo for the celebration of her 70th birthday [March 2007]. While there she said that she would like to fly to Mars, even if it meant that it was a one way trip.

Ross PK81
2008-Mar-10, 01:47 PM
pathetic!!, 1 way mission?..really guys...u gonna miss ur mother earth when u have landed over a boring red desert, only to perform nice photos or experiments..and without sex!!! :D, guys are u so desperate to reach that insipid rock to sacrifice a human live ?-the guy that will travel must be a mindless zealot-

send a monkey or a dog, lol

i wouldnt change my green/blue home for anything, just cant..CANT believe that such idea was proposed

the dumbest idea EVER

Why's it so dumb? There's bound to be some people in the world that would like to do this.

I couldn't do it myself because I'd miss my material things. I'd get really bored, there'd be no music (yes I could bring an ipod, but what happens when the battery is flat or it breaks down?), nothing.

The sex part wouldn't matter because I can't get any anyway, lol.

Noclevername
2008-Mar-10, 05:11 PM
We all live somewhere and we all die somewhere. What difference does it make if it's on this planet or that, as long as that person's doing what interests them?

antoniseb
2008-Mar-10, 06:30 PM
While I personally don't think I'd give up what I have here to live in the relative solitude of being Mars' only inhabitant, I can see that such a mission would appeal to some people who would also be qualified technologically and emotionally for such a trip.

I'm not against the idea. I do think that we should send a lot of equipment and robots there first to build the habitat, and supply it.

Svemir
2008-Mar-11, 09:10 PM
Well, you could certainly afford to save a lot more than one life on earth with the money you would save from not bringing the astronaut back from mars. This was true of Apollo too, but it was never seriously considered. Actually, you could save lives by not returning the people in the ISS to earth. Of course, once you start making routine missions one way, you're going to have a hard time finding quality recruits for your astronaut corps, but you'll probably still have plenty of volunteers.
Just promiss them 72 virgins afterwards :-)

Svemir
2008-Mar-11, 09:23 PM
When I get old (cough) put me in a space ship and shoot me to a comet.
I really want to know once for all if they are electric(al).

IsaacKuo
2008-Mar-12, 02:29 PM
I think this idea is awesome. Personally, I'd rather go on a one way trip to Alpha Centauri. But Mars would be wonderful also.

Heck, I really wouldn't mind just floating in Earth orbit for the rest of my life if it meant I wouldn't ever have to deal with any annoying people any more.

Ilya
2008-Mar-14, 02:32 AM
No way I would do that.


We all live somewhere and we all die somewhere. What difference does it make if it's on this planet or that, as long as that person's doing what interests them?

Precisely. Since going to Mars does not interest me (at least, not THAT much), I would not volunteer. Anyone who does, more power to them.

However...

Give me gills, and a bunch of other aquatic adaptations, and I would seriously consider never walking on land again. Although at least one similarly-adapted female companion (a.k.a. "mermaid") would be a requirement. I am not giving up sex!

Peter B
2008-Mar-14, 04:09 AM
One thing that has interested me in these sorts of discussions is that, in general, people are willing to risk greater danger to themselves than they are to accept a dangerous mission go ahead which only risks other people's lives:

"Would you go on a one-way mission to Mars, knowing you'd be alone for the first 26 months?" "Yes, absolutely. What an adventure!"

But

"What do you say to NASA sending a lone astronaut to Mars on a one-way trip?" "They're insane!"

And in fact even I think a little that way. If my circumstances were different, and I had confidence that either a self-sustaining community would develop on Mars, or, if not, the means would be developed to return me to Earth, I'd consider going alone for 26 months. A person on Mars today wouldn't be nearly as alone as Robinson Crusoe.

Noclevername
2008-Mar-14, 05:59 AM
Not to mention, you'd probably the most famous person to live.
Well, religious figures tend to sweep that category every year. ;) And I think somone psychologically suited to lifelong solitude would probably not care very much about fame.

IsaacKuo
2008-Mar-14, 07:17 PM
However...

Give me gills, and a bunch of other aquatic adaptations, and I would seriously consider never walking on land again. Although at least one similarly-adapted female companion (a.k.a. "mermaid") would be a requirement. I am not giving up sex!

What do you think of a fully customized love doll? You wouldn't have to worry relationship problems with it (compared to, say, a 60% divorce rate).

Getting back to the original topic, let's assume we have a suitable volunteer for the one way Mars mission. He or she has a hermit-like personality but will bring a love doll. Is that a deal-killer? A PR nightmare?

Bear in mind that a love doll won't add much to the mission costs, while a second crew member would.

Ilya
2008-Mar-14, 08:41 PM
What do you think of a fully customized love doll? You wouldn't have to worry relationship problems with it (compared to, say, a 60% divorce rate).

A love doll I would consider "sufficiently customized" would effectively be an AI qualifying for human rights.


Getting back to the original topic, let's assume we have a suitable volunteer for the one way Mars mission. He or she has a hermit-like personality but will bring a love doll. Is that a deal-killer? A PR nightmare?

Bear in mind that a love doll won't add much to the mission costs, while a second crew member would.

Yes, it would be a PR nightmare. But the OP mission would be a PR nightmare in and of itself.

IsaacKuo
2008-Mar-14, 09:23 PM
A love doll I would consider "sufficiently customized" would effectively be an AI qualifying for human rights.

Interesting. So essentially, the sexual companion needs to be human. This is somewhat interesting to me, because personally I find sex with a love doll less "icky" than sex with a prostitute (or even worse, a sex slave). And as far as ethics/morality goes, I believe sex with a love doll is merely the equivalent of masturbation.

Perhaps my attitudes are colored by the fact that I'm married. I have obligations to my wife, so the only way I could actually volunteer for a mission like this is if she agreed to it (unlikely) or if she were dead. Either way, I wouldn't want to have sex with anyone else, but a love doll is just masturbation. It's just a physiological release.


Yes, it would be a PR nightmare. But the OP mission would be a PR nightmare in and of itself.

Would the addition of a second crew member help?

Noclevername
2008-Mar-14, 10:01 PM
Careful, Isaac, we've already had one thread on adult topics closed "for the children".

JonClarke
2008-Mar-14, 10:32 PM
A two person mission is starting to be realistically doable, under some assumptions. A privately funded, bare bones flags and foot prints mission might well be done with two people. There have been polar expeditions that have involved year long or longer trips by just two people. A couple would be ideal.

Jon