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View Full Version : Travel by car in the U.S. - Blue Highways



Click Ticker
2008-Mar-10, 06:26 PM
http://www.us-highways.com/

Found this website when I was hunting for a route from my home to Orlando, FL that would avoid the interstates. It would be a roughly 1,300 mile trip. Kids are too young to attempt such and endeavor at present - but someday.

Shows the old highway system and how it developed. Interesting stuff for those who like that sort of thing.

NEOWatcher
2008-Mar-10, 06:40 PM
I don't know what a Blue Highway is, but every time I pick the blue line on the map, I get wet.

Anyway. I do like the charm of the old routes, but the nostalgia that people try to keep alive is not really going to happen.

The roadside attractions are virtually gone. So; even though using the old routes are a great way to savor the local customs, it just isn't the same.

Click Ticker
2008-Mar-10, 06:52 PM
I don't know what a Blue Highway is, but every time I pick the blue line on the map, I get wet.

Anyway. I do like the charm of the old routes, but the nostalgia that people try to keep alive is not really going to happen.

The roadside attractions are virtually gone. So; even though using the old routes are a great way to savor the local customs, it just isn't the same.

I know the term from the book, "Blue Highways" written by William Least-Heat-Moon. Similar to "Travels with Charley" by Steinbeck. He called them "Blue Highways" because they were always printed in the color blue on the old Rand McNally road atlas.

The nostalgia is the only thing left to enjoy. I couldn't imaging being forced to take one of those routes cross country when it was the only thing available and all you wanted to do is get somewhere. I do think it would be fun if the journey is the goal rather than the destination. $3.50 a gallon doesn't make this as much fun as it would have been 8 years ago.

I looked into train travel. Other than short trips in the US - that has also become more about the journey. Between connections and limited routes - it would take nearly three days to get to Florida from here.

Larry Jacks
2008-Mar-10, 06:55 PM
It would be a roughly 1,300 mile trip. Kids are too young to attempt such and endeavor at present - but someday.

Someone has to be the first to ask:

"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"
"Are we there yet?"

When traveling with small kids, getting to the destination as soon as possible is often more desireable than choosing a more scenic route.

darkhunter
2008-Mar-11, 01:08 AM
Which is why I take long road trips at night--the kids sleep through it..

Gillianren
2008-Mar-11, 01:15 AM
I know the term from the book, "Blue Highways" written by William Least-Heat-Moon. Similar to "Travels with Charley" by Steinbeck. He called them "Blue Highways" because they were always printed in the color blue on the old Rand McNally road atlas.

My mom and older sister were both really into that book. Somehow, I never got around to reading it. I have read The Lost Continent, by Bill Bryson, though, and it's worth checking out.

Actually, I don't recall ever having asked, "Are we there yet?" For one, I don't get carsick, even if I'm reading. I do remember making Donner Party jokes in the backseat when my mom was taking too long before stopping for meals, however.

sarongsong
2008-Mar-11, 08:46 AM
...when I was hunting for a route from my home to Orlando, FL that would avoid the interstates...Anyone heard of an inland waterway route that traverses the U.S. east coast without venturing into the Atlantic Ocean?
Caught the tail-end of a conversation once, about such a thing.

geonuc
2008-Mar-11, 09:43 AM
Anyone heard of an inland waterway route that traverses the U.S. east coast without venturing into the Atlantic Ocean?
Caught the tail-end of a conversation once, about such a thing.

Yep - it's called the intracoastal waterway.

geonuc
2008-Mar-11, 09:46 AM
http://www.us-highways.com/

Found this website when I was hunting for a route from my home to Orlando, FL that would avoid the interstates. It would be a roughly 1,300 mile trip. Kids are too young to attempt such and endeavor at present - but someday.

Shows the old highway system and how it developed. Interesting stuff for those who like that sort of thing.

Shunpiking is one of my favorite things to do, at least when I don't have to be somewhere soon. :)

closetgeek
2008-Mar-11, 02:47 PM
Which is why I take long road trips at night--the kids sleep through it..

I drive at night because the sun makes me drowsy...and the kids sleep.
they like road trips though. When asked, they all prefer the car drive from Fl to NY over the plane. Most of the time, it goes well, until the one time I did the drive without my husband. The minivan I rented broke down in the armpit of Virginia, at 1 a.m. and the replacement had to be brought to me from Penn. So me, a 9yr old, a 7yr old, and a 6yr old spent most of the night sitting next to a payphone (my cell died and I managed to forget my car charger) that was apparently the popular crack location. The guy that brought me my car was a bit taken back by the hugs I gave him when he finally showed up at 5:30 a.m.

I did plan to take a year travelling. My music teacher recommended the book Blue Highways but I done got knocked up and had to cancel the trip. All's well that ends well, however, knowing me I would have picked up and been killed by the first hitchhiker I saw.

Moose
2008-Mar-11, 03:16 PM
Yep - it's called the intracoastal waterway.

Retired friends of my family drove their boat through most of it last year, and my folks joined 'em for a couple of weeks. They had fun.

Argos
2008-Mar-11, 03:33 PM
Interesting thread. Iīm a big fan of road travelling, having travelled by car throughout Brazil, South America [north-south/east-west] and Europe. Hope to do the same in the US someday. Thereīs no other way to really get to know places. You canīt say you know somewhere going by plane.

Click Ticker
2008-Mar-11, 04:03 PM
I've been from Michigan to Northern California to Southern California and back to Michigan twice in my life via car. The drive out involved three hotel stays with arrival on the fourth day, but my parents weren't the marathon drivers that my wife and I are. I dare say I have more fond memories of the trip itself then our time spent in California. I-80 from the Sierra Nevada's into the Sacremento Valley is a fun drive.

In the Eastern US - Skyline Drive above the Shenendoah Valley is beautiful.

Gillianren
2008-Mar-11, 06:32 PM
When I was a kid, practically all we did was road trips. When I was very young, we'd travel along with my dad when he went on business trips to San Francisco (and no, I don't remember why he went on business trips to San Francisco), and in those cases, we'd fly. But even then, I remember driving trips. We'd tour missions; I have pictures of us at Fort Ross, though I don't remember the trip. There's very early pictures, I believe from before I was born, of my sister at the Four Corners looking confused. (She was probably almost two.) Did we take I-5 on our trips up and down through the state? I honestly don't remember. I do know that my mother categorically refuses to drive I-5 during the day in the summer if there's any way to get around it, and on our regular driving trips here after my sister started college in Tacoma, we'd take 101 quite a lot of the way, including most of the way through California.

Trebuchet
2008-Mar-11, 06:46 PM
We did a very nice mostly-blue-highways trip a few years ago visiting lighthouses in Washington and Oregon. Probably covered around 1200 miles in two weeks, with only around 200 on freeways. That was a great trip. Most days we only went a couple of hundred miles, a couple we just stayed in the same place and wandered about the area.