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Abbadon_2008
2008-Mar-12, 11:50 PM
What toy did you have as a child that brings back the fondest memories?



Legos were a gift from God(s) for me. What could POSSIBLY be better than a toy that helped you make OTHER toys?:dance:

mike alexander
2008-Mar-13, 12:08 AM
This may not count, but my father let me use his tools. In the expanding suburbs of the 50's there was always scrap wood and usuable material about. We kids built lots of stuff (clubhouses, coasters and such).

KaiYeves
2008-Mar-13, 12:10 AM
Bows and sucker arrows.
Legos.
Dinosaur figurines.

aurora
2008-Mar-13, 12:38 AM
erector set.

Noclevername
2008-Mar-13, 12:39 AM
Indoors, tinkertoys and clay. Outdoors, sticks, rocks and imagination. ;)

ravens_cry
2008-Mar-13, 12:48 AM
Lego, I still love it. I cant find for the life of me though those big tubs of generic blocks they used to sell. All I see is Lego Harry Potter this and Bionicle that.

Mr Q
2008-Mar-13, 12:55 AM
My first new shiny bike. With an electric horn and headlight, I was ready to "get out there" and explore the world around my neighborhood! :dance: Mr Q

Gemini
2008-Mar-13, 01:06 AM
I started on legos. Now I play with cardstock, and get stuff like this:
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j240/OV-104/LC05.jpg

BigDon
2008-Mar-13, 01:14 AM
As a little spratling in the sixties I loved the Mattel Strange Change Machine.
http://www.samstoybox.com/toys/StrangeChange.html

I just saw they came out when I was 7. Might have something to do with it.

And I can't remember what they were called but they had giant toy bugs that crawled when you pulled their strings. Had touch sensitive mandibles. Came with large six inch tall army men who, when placed in the line of travel, would be bitten and carried off by them. My older brother seems to think they were called "Horrible Hermans", but I can't find anything on them by that name.

jrkeller
2008-Mar-13, 01:15 AM
Model Rockets

Noclevername
2008-Mar-13, 01:36 AM
Micronauts. Odd, I know, but I was a kid.

Lord Jubjub
2008-Mar-13, 01:56 AM
Pitchback.

Basically, a net held in a metal frame with springs. Throw the ball at it and it comes back.

Noclevername
2008-Mar-13, 02:09 AM
I had a toy X-Wing, a Colonial Viper and and an Eagle from Space:1999. Wish I still had them.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Mar-13, 02:38 AM
Meccano (British version of erector I think)
It was nice to have a construction kit where you could actually build things strong enough to be used for real.

A couple of years ago I was briefly involved in a project making a glove for retraining fingers after accidents (I coded a game to be controlled by the glove), but since there was no prototype available I could code for, I used my Meccano set and a joystick to build one.
http://www.iaeste.dk/~henrik/images/ergo1.jpghttp://www.iaeste.dk/~henrik/images/ergo2.jpghttp://www.iaeste.dk/~henrik/images/ergo3.jpghttp://www.iaeste.dk/~henrik/images/ergo4.jpg
Surprisingly comfortable to wear and precise enough to replace a mouse,

hhEb09'1
2008-Mar-13, 02:46 AM
A pantograph I'd hounded my parents for, my fifth Xmas.

Frantic Freddie
2008-Mar-13, 03:09 AM
My Johnny Seven (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Seven_OMA),along with various other toy weapons.

Trebuchet
2008-Mar-13, 03:10 AM
Just about every building set imaginable. (Lego came along a bit later.) Anyhow, Erector, plastic bricks, Lincoln Logs, a really complicated skyscraper building set that I forget the name of, another one with girders & posts, and on and on.

Tonka trucks were also good. Not to mention my Daisy Red Ryder Carbine. (Still have that one! Never shot my eye out!)

Current favorite toy is in my avatar.

The Supreme Canuck
2008-Mar-13, 03:18 AM
Lego, without a doubt.

Torsten
2008-Mar-13, 04:49 AM
Legos were the best, especially growing up in a place with long winters. My kids got my collection and more were added.

Years ago I came into possession of many, many pieces of ~4m long 35x35 mm off-grade building material for the Japanese market, called "turuki". I cut out the knots, planed the resulting pieces down to 33 mm a side, and then cut them into lengths that are multiples of 33 mm, up to 8x. Young children just love to stack these because they can always make their structures come out level. (I think it also helps them learn about integers, but that's getting too geeky.)

My kids and I made up a game. Each person had a turn at selecting a block and stacking it. No verbal communication about intentions was allowed. The idea was to see what would result. Here's an example:
http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh315/TKphotofolder/BAUT/Thebestwoodenblocksgame.jpg
We were obviously on the same page regarding the base for this particular one.

Graybeard6
2008-Mar-13, 05:32 AM
A Buck Rogers ZX-31 Rocket Pistol, made by Daisy, designed by Philip Francis Nolan; see here:http://www.geocities.com/buckrogers_nz/daisy.html?200813
I also had a Daisy Red Ryder BB Gun, A Winchester .22 rifle, and use of .25 and .45 colt automatic pistols under very strict supervision. These were not toys, but I conquered the solar system with that ZX-31. All of the above were lost when our house burned down when I was 13. I just realized that the fire was 60 years ago this month! Weird, no?

Chuck
2008-Mar-13, 05:51 AM
Operation Moonbase (http://telstarlogistics.typepad.com/telstarlogistics/images/2007/12/23/moonmodel.jpg).

I got it for Christmas in 1962.

BigDon
2008-Mar-13, 06:21 AM
My Johnny Seven (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Seven_OMA),along with various other toy weapons.

I remember my older brother getting one of those. Think "Malcolm in The Middle" (a sitcom here in the states) and having Malcolm's next older brother Reese as your older brother. He had like minded friends also equipped. I spent a lot of time getting shot by those little plastic bullets.

Of course a shoe thrown in ernest does make a good come-back to getting shot with plastic bullets, until one goes through a window. Breaking a window because you were throwing things in the house was always going to get you a butt whipping when I was growing up. Happened to me a bunch of times. Especially one of the front of the house windows. They have to be replaced right away or it really looks like hell. Off hand I recall breaking five, maybe six windows (throwning stuff).

Not counting my brothers and sisters and friends. Children tend to cause wear on a house. (Oh heck, first ale I let myself have since this cold hit hard and I've gone and spilled it in my lap. Only got to lick the foam. It was my only one too. Since it was in my favorite wide mouth glass, the better to quaff it with, I'm now sitting in a pool of Full Sail Amber Ale. Feels kinda special, pooling in the ergonomic chair and all. Darn. Shoot. Major blasphemies in a long string.)

I remember one all day dirt rock fight, during summer vacation, with the parents at work, where I and my younger brother and our friends used our partially enclosed back porch as a fort. It was elevated and the railing was covored by plywood providing good protection.

The opfor was my older brother and his friends. We'ed send the little brothers out with buckets to gather ammo (dirt rocks) while we covered them, armed with newpapers and water ballons.

About ten minutes before my Mom was due to get off work the League Of Evil Older Brothers finally got the capital to afford their own water balloons and soon the air was full of high velocity rubber encased spheroids of water going in both directions as both sides had laid in a stock during the lull.

That was when I got curious about something missing. Some sound I should have been hearing. Then I got it. I wasn't hearing the incoming balloons hit the back door. I stepped out of the bright sunlight and saw why. Sometime early in the fight, which started about 9 am, someone left the back door open.

Every single miss the Evil Older Brothers threw, that went high, went into my mother's kitchen.

(very heavy sigh)

Anybody else here have a farm raised mother? Whose own mother cooked competitivly? Those pies, jams and preserves and things. Whos mother in turn was a confectioner?

Women like that tend to take a dim view of impromptu dioramas of lunar rays some four feet wide and having an apex just passed the far side of the kitchen table. The table with the dried flower display in the middle and the white table cloth and all. Length wise to the assault. Of course.

With some half dozen higher speed impactors carrying completely over the table and hitting the china cabinette glass hard enough to not break it, but leave those cone shaped dirt globs with rays of their own.

I turned around and ran like hell.

My smarter, closer friends joined me. As we blew through enemy lines, the confused and dim witted Evil Older Brothers thought, "What the heck?" And went into the house to see what was up. That's where Mom came in on them with dirt rocks and water balloons in hand!

It was said there was a flood of neutrinos prior to the eruption.

Several metals, notably copper and nickel, transmuted to higher isotopes and a rooster laid an egg. Air cracked sideways, flys fell dead and I'm fairly certain several clocks remain frozen to this day.

Oh. My. God. I know that's a teenie bopper phrase, but it kind of comes close. There was a wee bit o' trouble from the parenting department that very afternoon. I was one fast talking ten year old. (I was throwing the OTHER way! Didn't seem to help as much as I expected.)

See what happens when you don't have X-Box! Memories and things! They clog up your brain so they can't be good for you!

BD

novaderrik
2008-Mar-13, 09:51 AM
between the erectors sets that my dad passed down to me and my extensive Transformers and GI Joe collection, i had plenty to do at home.
when i walked the 6 blocks to my grandparent's house (i started making that journey solo when i was about 5 years old) i had more erector sets, a Daisy BB gun (to help control the squirrel population. those little gray buggers have an affinity for wiring in attics), hammers, nails, screws, and enough scraps of plywood to build whatever type of fort i could think to build. i built one that had 4 rooms when i was 7 or so, and it stood for about 3 years- which is pretty impressive considering the MN climate changes from season to season. when i wasn't building or shooting stuff, i was getting my nice new shirts all greasy by helping my dad and grandpa work on cars or build "go carts" to go down the hill on the street out of plywood and wagon wheels.
ahh, the late 70's/early 80's was a great time to be a kid in small town America..

Tog
2008-Mar-13, 10:28 AM
Don, that has to be one of the best stories yet. I'm still giggling about it.

For me, nothing beat graph paper. That thick yellowish stuff they gave you in school. I used to swipe a few every day so we'd run out faster so I could volunteer to got to the supply office to get more, dropping off more in my locker.

I still have some the spaceships I drew. Castles, and forts. Camps that my friends and I would plan the best way to assault, then act out in his back yard. We even used to design the control panels for the ships. Anything that the Enterprise could do on the huge set we could fit onto one 9 by 12 inch sheet of graph paper.* I used to to figure out stuff on the guitar. I'd play something then write down the fret and string, like Tabs, but long before I knew what tabs were.

*The control panel thing started in the 4th grade. I was bored so I made a button on a sheet of paper and wrote "Fire" under it. The guy (Doug) on the two desks away was the target. I waited until he looked over then held up the paper and pressed the button, miming a missile flying at him and exploding. A bit later he bettered me with a sheet of paper with two buttons: "Fire" and "Shields". From there it escalated until I had the speed controls, atmospheric sensors, damage control, weapons status, all made with one of those big 4 color pens and graph paper.

Esther, the girl that sat between us, was not as impressed as I'd hoped. Thinking back on it, she was also no as apathetic as she probably should have been. Makes me wonder. I never could pick up hints.

jrkeller
2008-Mar-13, 11:46 AM
Another favorite was spirograph.

I remember it came with pins to hold the papers in place. Never see that now, the lawyers would have a field days with the lawsuits.

Ara Pacis
2008-Mar-13, 12:09 PM
Army men. But it didn't stop there. We also had smaller, diorama sized army men from certain wars, nations and units. Then we'd have wars between the Big Men and the Little Men with larger and smaller planes and tanks and stuff being distributed appropriately. Sometimes we'd have Big Men that were war and nationality based, and they would side with the similar national Little Men (usually German versus American. We'd usually fight the wars in forts made from Lincoln Logs, block sets, and Girder sets either on the basement floor or the Pool Table, though we sometimes took them into the sandbox, but stopped when they got lost in the mud (we always dug a moat).

AndreH
2008-Mar-13, 12:21 PM
For indoor: LEGO I built everything with them. container ships, bridges, space ships, moon bases..............

And:
Outdoors, sticks, rocks and imagination.

ravens-cry: you have to check the LEGO internet shop and you will get standard blocks of any type. I agree that it is to "specialised" today.

Laguna
2008-Mar-13, 12:54 PM
Lego.

Ilya
2008-Mar-13, 01:20 PM
Glass jar with bugs and leaves. Also basin full of water, plants, bugs and tadpoles from a nearby ditch.

Swift
2008-Mar-13, 01:31 PM
From my childhood, I would have to pick Legos, though I also had an Erector set and other things like that (and of course a chemistry set). But across my whole life, it would have to be models, mostly model trains, but also built a whole bunch of other things too. I was very into model trains from around age 8 to around 20, kind of ignored it for years, then took it up again about 10 or 12 years ago. Guess I just like making things.

timetraveller
2008-Mar-13, 01:34 PM
for me it was meccano started me on the road to engineering and even astronomy wonder if anyone else made the model radio telescope

Abbadon_2008
2008-Mar-13, 02:31 PM
Micronauts were way cool. But they were fragile. They ususally wound up being folded into my Star Wars universe, along with the SW figurines. But they broke, pieces fell off, etc...

I kept their vehicles for a long time, though. My SW figures always needed 'droids and speeders, so Micronaut stuff worked well for that.

ngc3314
2008-Mar-13, 02:52 PM
Operation Moonbase (http://telstarlogistics.typepad.com/telstarlogistics/images/2007/12/23/moonmodel.jpg).

I got it for Christmas in 1962.

Yes! That's what it was called.

I still have a box of Major Matt Mason gear, rescued from my mom's attic. Other than that, it was too long ago to remember much detail...

Swift
2008-Mar-13, 03:03 PM
I am surprised that no one has mentioned cars. I had several Tonka trucks (the jeep and a dump truck, IIRC), and a few Corgis, but I loved Matchbox. I would save my pennies and buy a new one every once in a while (I remember they were 50 cents in the mid 60s). I had (and still have) hundreds.

Tinaa
2008-Mar-13, 03:21 PM
I loved my Barbies. I suppose creating new outfits out of my mother's scrap material was what I really liked. Of course, my Barbies parachuted off the roof of the house, high dived off the shower curtain rod, rode in her car pulled behind my bike. She was a tough one.

Fazor
2008-Mar-13, 03:28 PM
I always liked the little firguines/action figures... fond memories of Battle Beasts (http://www.virtualtoychest.com/battlebeasts/battlebeasts.html), though I had no idea what they were called until I did a google on "mini figurines, 80's, color chaning stickers" (and sorting out the transformers stuff :razz:).

Also loved the Monster in My Pocket (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monster_in_My_Pocket) figures (though, that phrase now generally illicits a slap from the nearest woman).

I don't remember having any of the figures, but I remember the Centurions (http://www.virtualtoychest.com/centurions/centurions.html) from a coloring book that I loved. I *think* I may have had the blue figure (first and second pic on that link)...but I can't remember for sure.

I do remember coloring in the book from a hotel room in south carolina, on our way down to relatives in Florida. My dad went out and got us subway for dinner. Itallian BMT on itallian bread...first time I had it that it ever came with pickels, and mayo AND mustard...and I loved it (I've ordered it that way ever since). I would have been about 7 years old (almost 20 years ago! wow)...isn't it amazing the random things you can remember?

Larry Jacks
2008-Mar-13, 03:42 PM
M-80s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKA6lzjOyxo) and cherry bombs. Lots of great childhood memories with those.

Swift
2008-Mar-13, 07:44 PM
I loved my Barbies. I suppose creating new outfits out of my mother's scrap material was what I really liked. Of course, my Barbies parachuted off the roof of the house, high dived off the shower curtain rod, rode in her car pulled behind my bike. She was a tough one.
My wife had an original Barbie, in the black and white one piece, which her mom has kept all these years. She reportedly also use to make clothes for her. My sister had Barbie and Skipper. They used to hang out with my GI Joe (back when Joe was the same size as Barbie, not the little ones they have now). You know how those GIs are. ;) And, appropriate to BAUT, I had the GI Joe Mercury Capsule (http://home.att.net/~g.ruboyianes/joe2.html)!

geonuc
2008-Mar-13, 09:44 PM
I was big into Matchbox cars. And model rockets.

Van Rijn
2008-Mar-13, 10:16 PM
Yes! That's what it was called.

I still have a box of Major Matt Mason gear, rescued from my mom's attic. Other than that, it was too long ago to remember much detail...

Matt Mason stuff was a favorite, along with model spacecraft and other space themed toys. I liked erector more than legos (legos tended to fall apart) and my real chemistry set (not like the "safe" stuff today).

Parrothead
2008-Mar-13, 11:16 PM
Indoors - hot wheels/matchbox/corgi jr cars whizzing around on tracks. I still have some of the track sets, supercharger, hot rodder, speedometer, lap counter attachments. Mom made me give my collection of cars with matchbox case to a cousin. I managed to rescue three cars, that I still have: corgi jr Porsche 917K (gold colour), matchbox Mod Rod No. 1 with red wheels and "R" series No 55 Mercury Police Car.

Outdoors - tonka truck and pair of dune buggies. SSP rocket car (kids being kids, the ripcords would become weapons at some point).

KaiYeves
2008-Mar-14, 12:14 AM
The 1999 Hess Space Shuttle!

captain swoop
2008-Mar-14, 10:12 AM
Lego
Action Man (original not the new 'eco warrior')
Airfix 1/72 Soldiers and their various 'Action Sets' I had the Roman Mile Fort, French Foreigh Legion fort, Coastal Defence fort, Gun Emplacement, Jungle Outpost, Pontoon Bridge and Forward Command post.
To go with them I had Romans, Ancient Britains, French Foreign Legion, Beduin Warriors on Camels and all manner of WW2 figures.

The great thing is my 8 year old hasexactly the same sets, they are still in production :)

My Space 1999 Eagles were good as well.

drainbread
2008-Mar-14, 02:41 PM
Gen 1 Transformers.

Nick Theodorakis
2008-Mar-14, 06:41 PM
Matt Mason stuff was a favorite, along with model spacecraft and other space themed toys. I liked erector more than legos (legos tended to fall apart) and my real chemistry set (not like the "safe" stuff today).

I also had a Matt Mason set (dolls^W --- oops I mean action figures--, lunar rover and moon base) that I liked, and also a Lost in Space set that included the ship and the rover. But I think my favorite toy was a table-top ice hockey game (the kind where you control the players with sliding knobs).

Nick

RalofTyr
2008-Mar-14, 07:40 PM
The GI Joe Space Station set. It was the one that mimiced the space shuttle with a crawler/launch paid, booster/station and shuttle.

I still remember the day my step-dad took me to get it. My friends were with me. It was a warm day, I think Wenesday, the week after Christmas, 1990. It was warm (70F) and sunny out. We had to search severl Toys R Us to find it. We found one at the one near South Coast Plaza mall. About nine months later, after we moved, I gave it to the younger neigbor kids.


I also liked StarCom and Air Raiders. Watching StarCom cartoons on Youtube, I didn't know how much science was sneaked in, such as life on Europa etc.

The StarCom base did have an encounter with an "Alien". Few survived.


When we were kids, my friend asked me once why our toys are fighting, I couldn't think of a reason other than to fight, now, I can think of many reasons to have a military conflict.

novaderrik
2008-Mar-15, 08:03 AM
The GI Joe Space Station set. It was the one that mimiced the space shuttle with a crawler/launch paid, booster/station and shuttle.

I still remember the day my step-dad took me to get it. My friends were with me. It was a warm day, I think Wenesday, the week after Christmas, 1990. It was warm (70F) and sunny out. We had to search severl Toys R Us to find it. We found one at the one near South Coast Plaza mall. About nine months later, after we moved, I gave it to the younger neigbor kids.


I also liked StarCom and Air Raiders. Watching StarCom cartoons on Youtube, I didn't know how much science was sneaked in, such as life on Europa etc.

The StarCom base did have an encounter with an "Alien". Few survived.


When we were kids, my friend asked me once why our toys are fighting, I couldn't think of a reason other than to fight, now, I can think of many reasons to have a military conflict.
i also had that GI Joe shuttle set- it was called the Defiant- it was really cool and detailed. but my favorite part of launching the shuttle was when i had it land on the 7.5 foot long deck of the USS Flagg aircraft carrier that took up 1/2 of my room.
both of them are listed here (http://www.retrojunk.com/details_articles/75/). and, no, the Flagg didn't float like the linked page says it did- it didn't even have a real bottom.
i might have grown up poor, but i got the coolest Christmas and birthday presents from my grandpa. i think i had every major GI Joe play set ever made- from the original GI Joe headquarters to the COBRA Terror Drome (http://www.yojoe.com/vehicles/86/terrordrome/) (which was way cool)to the oil rig looking platform thing. my room was full of lovely plastic toys that encouraged violence and posed choking hazards to small children..

Van Rijn
2008-Mar-15, 08:54 AM
I also had a Matt Mason set (dolls^W --- oops I mean action figures--, lunar rover and moon base) that I liked, and also a Lost in Space set that included the ship and the rover. But I think my favorite toy was a table-top ice hockey game (the kind where you control the players with sliding knobs).

Nick

NEVER call them dolls! These were action figures with spacecraft and guns and stuff!

Anyway, I found this amusing. From here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_Matt_Mason


In Popular Culture

Major Matt Mason action figures were referenced in the pilot episode of Stargate SG-1, in which Samantha Carter defends her femininity saying, "I used to play with dolls as a kid". This prompts Kowalski to reply, "G.I. Joe?", and she responds, "No, Major Matt Mason." Ferretti chimes in with, "Did you have that cool backpack thing that made him fly?"

Not as funny, but an interesting bit from the same page:


Mattel dropped the line in the early 1970s as interest in the space program declined; however the figure is still fondly remembered, and the collector's market for this line of toys can demand top dollar for figures and accessories in as mint condition as possible. One such mint figure of the Major has reportedly accompanied several US Space Shuttle flights as an "unofficial crewman", and it has been confirmed that the figure did fly on John Glenn's Shuttle flight in 1998.

mugaliens
2008-Mar-15, 09:10 AM
Tough question. I had a red bike that lasted me from 5 to 13. A set of blocks that my parents still have - it's been fun playing with them with my own son. A Monopoly game that's older than dirt. I think my Mom got it for her sixth birthday. It's the same one my son grew up with.

Model rockets and line control airplanes round out the list.

But those were all store-bought. I think the most fun I had as a kid was the product of whatever I and my friends could imagine between our left ears and our right ears, and how we went about putting all that imagineering into motion.

Van Rijn
2008-Mar-15, 09:11 AM
i also had that GI Joe shuttle set- it was called the Defiant- it was really cool and detailed. but my favorite part of launching the shuttle was when i had it land on the 7.5 foot long deck of the USS Flagg aircraft carrier that took up 1/2 of my room.
both of them are listed here (http://www.retrojunk.com/details_articles/75/). and, no, the Flagg didn't float like the linked page says it did- it didn't even have a real bottom.


That stuff is from way after my time, but I did have the G.I. Joe Mercury capsule. (http://www.geocities.com/holosuite/gijoe/JOECAP.jpg) It supposedly could float too. What they didn't bother to mention is that the detailed glued-on instrument panel was paper and not water proof. Maybe if I had been older I would have realized that before I put it in the water, but come on! What else are you going to do with a space capsule if not demonstrate a water landing?

Donnie B.
2008-Mar-15, 06:11 PM
This isn't a tough question at all, though that depends on your definition of "toy".

If it's eligible, there's only one possible answer: Frisbee.

However, a Frisbee is more like sports equipment than a toy. You wouldn't answer this question with "football" or "baseball glove", so a Frisbee is borderline.

If that answer is disqualified I'd have a tough choice to make. Tinkertoys and the Erector set would be strong possibilities. In terms of longevity, though, I might mention "train set". My Xmas HO train led to a model railroading hobby that lasted quite a few years. The electrical part (power pack and wiring) set me on a path to a career.

peteshimmon
2008-Mar-15, 07:25 PM
Been into most of what has already been
mentioned... meccano, train sets, electronic
construction sets, pea shooters, cap bombs
(cant get caps these days for some reason),
spud guns, Home made plastic parachutes.
String pulled helecopters were fun. But young
whippersnappers these days have radio
controlled models they can fly indoors!
I was born at the wrong time!

No I wasn't.

A best invention was a one shot smoke puffer,
a matchstick rolled into a square foot of
newspaper and stuck in the stove. All my own:)

JMV
2008-Mar-15, 08:19 PM
Stiga Snow Racer (http://www.sport-outdoor-fun.de/shop/images/stigablackline.jpg). Every kid in the neighbourhood had one, but mine was a special edition piece with coil spring suspension on the front ski and an automatically retracting pull string. It was black with gold stripes and decals, everyone else had those lame yellow or red ones.

novaderrik
2008-Mar-15, 08:22 PM
one good thing that came out of all those huge plastic GI Joe battle sets that i had was that they all had to be put together- which was actually my favorite part of getting those things. opening the box of some of those monstrosities was like opening a brand new snap tite model kit (which i also enjoyed). more than anything, i learned patience and the ability to look at the big picture from putting them together- and i tried my best not to break them if i could help it, since i could easily have a couple of hours in putting something together and putting all those stickers on "just right"..

Fadingstar
2008-Mar-15, 10:01 PM
For me it was meccano, lego, train set (good ol' standard 00 gauge), scalextric, action man(with moving eyes and gripping hands!) and airfix models.

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Mar-16, 01:44 PM
legos
Voltron (my grandmother and mother got together to get the whole set on christmas)

captain swoop
2008-Mar-16, 09:22 PM
I didn't get into Model Trains until about 10 years ago. so I guess it doesn't count lol

Chuck
2008-Mar-16, 10:16 PM
In addition to Operation Moon Base, I also had Great Garloo (http://www.robotnut.com/gallery/gar1.jpg), Mystery Spaceship (http://www.go-boom.com/images/marx_mystery_ship.jpg), Battlewagon (http://www.timewarptoys.com/bwagon.jpg), and Girder and Panel Building Set (http://i.treehugger.com/files/th_images/kenner%20big.jpg).

Spacewriter
2008-Mar-16, 10:17 PM
tinker toys, a microscope, a transistor radio, and legos.

Don't have any of them anymore, but they are the most memorable...

closetgeek
2008-Mar-17, 05:04 PM
Despite my requests, my mother insisted that toys were divided by gender and girls should play with girl toys. I wanted lego's and got more barbie stuff to sit in the closet and collect dust. I wanted He-man and Voltron but I got baby dolls and more Barbie stuff. One year, my father finally got me Laser tag, but no one else had it so that wasn't much fun. I suppose my BMX was the most fun. It was my motorcycle, it was my horse, it was my...what was the name of those single or double person vehicles in the beginning of Return of the Jedi? (sorry, not the biggest Star Wars fan).

Infinity Watcher
2008-Mar-17, 11:06 PM
It was my motorcycle, it was my horse, it was my...what was the name of those single or double person vehicles in the beginning of Return of the Jedi? (sorry, not the biggest Star Wars fan).
[star wars geek] philistine;)
Sure about the beginning? the beginning starts on tatoine and the first vehicles we see are the sail barges, now towards the end we see scout troopers on speeder bikes (http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/74-Z_speeder_bike) which would mesh with a bicycle fairly well other 2 man vehicles are the AT-ST walker, most of the starfighters are 1 man (I'd have to check which model of B-Wing was in use but that was probably the earlier version which was 1 man[/star wars geek]

closetgeek
2008-Mar-18, 01:05 PM
[star wars geek] philistine;)
Sure about the beginning? the beginning starts on tatoine and the first vehicles we see are the sail barges, now towards the end we see scout troopers on speeder bikes (http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/74-Z_speeder_bike) which would mesh with a bicycle fairly well other 2 man vehicles are the AT-ST walker, most of the starfighters are 1 man (I'd have to check which model of B-Wing was in use but that was probably the earlier version which was 1 man[/star wars geek]


Yes, those are they. I thought it was relatively close to the beginning when Leia was riding one and crashed...isn't that how she met the Ewoks?

Infinity Watcher
2008-Mar-18, 01:59 PM
Yes, those are they. I thought it was relatively close to the beginning when Leia was riding one and crashed...isn't that how she met the Ewoks?

Correct, it's towards the beginning of the battle but at a rough guess it's at leat halfway through the film since the battle of endor is part of the movie's climax, it's been a couple of months since I watched the film though since I've been busy so i could be a bit off on this one.

DyerWolf
2008-Mar-18, 03:02 PM
PK Ripper BMX bike, boogie board and mask,snorkel and fins.

I could ride two miles from my house down the bridle trail fronting the rich neighborhoods down to Malaga Cove where I would boogie board half the day and once the waves were blown out snorkel among the rocks until it got dark.

Saw lots of fish, shark, octopi, seals, dolphins, and countless anemone and sea urchins.

LINK (http://www.saintbrendan.com/cdnjune02/MalagaCv.html)
Photo (http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/1955110/2/istockphoto_1955110_beautiful_south_bay_california _coastline.jpg)
Photo2 (http://206.173.89.39/PalosVerdesRealty_net/AddlInfo/photo_1.jpg)

Moose
2008-Mar-18, 03:44 PM
Easily Lego, even if I never got that big space cruiser set I really REALLY wanted (rather, I eventually got both of the smaller ships from that category.)

I did, however, make both fully transformable Voltrons out of the general sets I'd accumulated up to that point.

And I'd frequently hijack my mother's ironing board to double as the flight deck of a vietnam-era supercarrier, complete with two or three squadrons of F-4 Phantoms (and a single F-14a in its final acceptance trials).

Now, as an adult, I secretly lust* after the Star Destroyer official set and that 40-foot floating carrier some lunatic** made in his garage. (Pics aren't hard to find. Just go to Lego's site and search from there.)

* Did I say that out loud?
** Normally I'd say maniac, but I won't pander to marketers. Not even Lego's.

Moose
2008-Mar-18, 03:46 PM
Saw lots of fish, shark, octopi, seals, dolphins, and countless anemone and sea urchins.

But did you ever "see me" a shark eating an octopus? More importantly, how about a "phantom Russian submarine"?

captain swoop
2008-Mar-18, 08:55 PM
Now, as an adult, I secretly lust* after the Star Destroyer official set and that 40-foot floating carrier some lunatic** made in his garage. (Pics aren't hard to find. Just go to Lego's site and search from there.)
.

I got my son (he's 8) the Lego Star Destroyer for Christmas.

Moose
2008-Mar-18, 10:48 PM
I got my son (he's 8) the Lego Star Destroyer for Christmas.

Lemme guess, you just happened to be available to help read the plans, right? ;)

darkhunter
2008-Mar-19, 01:49 AM
It took me and my son about 16 hours to build the Star Destroyer....

Florida_PI
2008-Mar-19, 04:49 AM
Made by Mattel. They had real plastic bullets powered by a spring in each casing. The holster was real leather with a leather belt and tie down.

DyerWolf
2008-Mar-19, 01:55 PM
But did you ever "see me" a shark eating an octopus? More importantly, how about a "phantom Russian submarine"?

No but I did see a dapper guy being chased by sharks with Frikin Lasers on their heads!

Nadme
2008-Mar-20, 05:00 PM
Easy-Bake Oven [mid-1970s]. :D My dad loved wolfing down those treats. Fun on a rainy afternoon.

captain swoop
2008-Mar-21, 10:19 PM
Made by Mattel. They had real plastic bullets powered by a spring in each casing. The holster was real leather with a leather belt and tie down.

I had a Thompson SMG and an SLR the FN-FAL used by the Brit army till the 80s) made by Airfix, they had magazines you loaded with plastic bullets that you could shoot your friends with.

CyberCecil
2008-Mar-24, 04:41 AM
I had all the standards like Lego and Erector sets, but my favorites were the Starbird (http://www.bugeyedmonster.com/toys/starbird/) and the Big Trak (http://www.bugeyedmonster.com/toys/bigtrak/).

ginnie
2008-Mar-25, 12:05 AM
A table Ice Hockey Game.

(hey, I'm Canadian),

danscope
2008-Mar-25, 12:23 AM
Ahhhh........favourite toy.....that would be....(outside of my golf clubs )...
would be a Hans Christian 38, a very nice sailboat....double ender, built for crusing and sea. Room...for more toys ! :D

Best regards, Dan

Mister Earl
2008-Apr-02, 01:21 PM
Super Nintendo -> Final Fantasy 3. The first real game to have an actual storyline that hooked you.

Neverfly
2008-Apr-02, 02:27 PM
Super Nintendo -> Final Fantasy 3. The first real game to have an actual storyline that hooked you.

For me- it was Final Fantasy seven. (Obviously...:whistle:)
The story line hooked me HARD.

I'm not sure what it is exactly about vicariously following the story of a character that we can relate to- but once in a while- a producer puts out a product that just goes right to the bone.

closetgeek
2008-Apr-02, 03:04 PM
Easy-Bake Oven [mid-1970s]. :D My dad loved wolfing down those treats. Fun on a rainy afternoon.

I had a Holly Hobbie one. That really was a fun thing to do when we couldn't go outside. Ah, even then my cooking was for the birds.

closetgeek
2008-Apr-02, 03:06 PM
For me- it was Final Fantasy seven. (Obviously...:whistle:)
The story line hooked me HARD.

I'm not sure what it is exactly about vicariously following the story of a character that we can relate to- but once in a while- a producer puts out a product that just goes right to the bone.

That's another game I couldn't play but loved to watch. You know the story behind the name right? It was their last attempt at a successful game before totally giving up. I never could understand how you could have so many Final Fantasies

Neverfly
2008-Apr-02, 03:16 PM
That's another game I couldn't play but loved to watch. You know the story behind the name right? It was their last attempt at a successful game before totally giving up. I never could understand how you could have so many Final Fantasies

An attempt that succeeded at that.
Final Fantasy seven spawned many animations,cartoons and by products (by products?:p maybe I meant buy products...) and later a movie solely about that one story line.
A lot of people felt that FF: The Spirits Within was only a test run to see if it was a good idea to put up the money required to make Advent Children. I'm glad they did. It was an incredible job- they even included some of the original team who made the game- and stuck very very closely to the story line. (The materia was a bit weird in Advent Children though).
I was pretty upset that they switched the designer team over. Final Fantasy 8 was horrible. Every thing after it was pretty horrible too.
Ten wasn't too bad, but still too similar to eight and to dissimilar to all those that preceded eight.

It was like Star Wars being made by Micheal Bay or something.

ETA:I didn't know that about the name though. I had assumed an entirely different meaning...

captain swoop
2008-Apr-02, 08:35 PM
If it's computer games then Thief and Thief II that hooked me in a big way.

pzkpfw
2008-Apr-03, 12:19 AM
Two weeks ago I turned 38 and my wife got me the infra-red remote control Lego Bulldozer.

That makes about 33 years of Lego for me.

(Toy soldiers came in number 2 [which is today expressed in playing wargames, mostly on PC but also board-and-counter style games {with my Son}] - guess what my plan is for the 'dozer parts...)

P.S. there is no "s" in Lego.

BigDon
2008-Apr-03, 02:22 AM
For me- it was Final Fantasy seven. (Obviously...:whistle:)
The story line hooked me HARD.

I'm not sure what it is exactly about vicariously following the story of a character that we can relate to- but once in a while- a producer puts out a product that just goes right to the bone.


Yeah HALO for the X-box did that do me. Boo and I split screen when she spends the night. Boo is the absolute best wingman you have in the game. Unlike my aggressive younger brother who always ends up running into my line of fire and then snarling at me when he dies and my "cautious" older daughter who ends up shooting me in the butt more often than not, one time sticking a plasma grenade to the back of my head in a serious fire fight.

Boo on the otherhand usually stays off to my left and lets me lead by a couple of feet, so its an echelon formation. AND she is prompt and accurate with the return fire. I can't tell you how many times I'd be knee deep in the hoopala, suddenly go into that automatic reload phase with a badguy bearing down and you know your not going to make it and suddenly that sweet stream of tracer fire blazes in from the left and wastes the badguy.

FriedPhoton
2008-Apr-03, 04:15 AM
Let's see... matches, my friend's sisters, a set of lock picks, a lineman's phone, anything that would explode, dad's magazine collection, doorbells, eggs, soap, toilet paper, snowballs (vs. automobiles), tomatoes (vs. automobiles)... and the list goes on... ah, memories.


Ok, seriously? Legos were awesome, I had an A.M. radio I enjoyed, a crystal radio, my dad's train set (it was wayyyy cooler than mine... took up half the basement), books, GI Joe, and my dad's tools.

pzkpfw
2008-Apr-03, 05:42 AM
Ok, seriously? Legos were awesome, ...

Ok, seriously? Grrrr!

p.s. there is no "s" in Lego!

BigDon
2008-Apr-03, 05:59 AM
snowballs (vs. automobiles), tomatoes (vs. automobiles)... and the list goes on... ah, memories..


Hey Fried!

When I was about 15 my friends and I found a full gunny sack of "over the hill" potatos. Behind the corner Mels Drive-in. Those huge french fry class potatos. The ones paler and smoother than russets. Anyway some of these potatos were pretty rank, yet would have a fairly solid section that looked normal and provided easy grip. So you know it was only a matter of time before one became a projectile. I believe it was my friend Tony (13 at the time) who cast the first spud.

He was shooting for my brother and hit my brother's younger friend who was about 10, my brother was 13. The ten year old started to cry because that was one nasty potato. As I recall there was macroscopic life in it.

Well you know of course this meant war.

And the thing was, the war kept getting bigger and bigger. This was the afternoon in the middle of a long summer in 1975. I remember the band Chicago playing from an open second story window of a psuedo-Victorian. I remember the horn section and the voice but not the song.

Bored kids showed up until every kid in an area of five blocks was participating. We had broken up then by neighborhood into four different armies and about a dozen independants.

The intersection of Miller and Linden in South San Francisco was an inch deep in squished potatoes for fifty feet in all four directions. Cars driving by started losing traction even at the low speed they approached this goddawful mess at and do that off kilter slide like folks in Detroit like to do on ice with their cars for half the year.

The civil authorites showed up pretty quick after that. Oh, there was a hell of a scramble scene too as they came in without sirens. I'd been playing "hide and seek" and "army" in this neighborhood since I was 5. No way did they come close to catching me or my brothers. Even better than knowing which yards do or don't have big dogs in them as you're hopping fences is knowing which yards have big dogs in them that know YOU.

Acts as a filter to pursuit.

Jason
2008-Apr-03, 07:27 PM
Legos, absolutely. If I wanted an X-wing fighter I'd have one in a couple hours. If I want a model of the Enterprise I'd have one in a couple hours. If I wanted a dump truck, I'd have one in a couple of minutes.
Legos are nearly all toys at once, really.

FriedPhoton
2008-Apr-04, 12:51 AM
Hey Fried!

When I was about 15 my friends and I found a full gunny sack of "over the hill" potatos. Behind the corner Mels Drive-in. Those huge french fry class potatos. The ones paler and smoother than russets. Anyway some of these potatos were pretty rank, yet would have a fairly solid section that looked normal and provided easy grip. So you know it was only a matter of time before one became a projectile. I believe it was my friend Tony (13 at the time) who cast the first spud.

He was shooting for my brother and hit my brother's younger friend who was about 10, my brother was 13. The ten year old started to cry because that was one nasty potato. As I recall there was macroscopic life in it.

Well you know of course this meant war.

And the thing was, the war kept getting bigger and bigger. This was the afternoon in the middle of a long summer in 1975. I remember the band Chicago playing from an open second story window of a psuedo-Victorian. I remember the horn section and the voice but not the song.

Bored kids showed up until every kid in an area of five blocks was participating. We had broken up then by neighborhood into four different armies and about a dozen independants.

The intersection of Miller and Linden in South San Francisco was an inch deep in squished potatoes for fifty feet in all four directions. Cars driving by started losing traction even at the low speed they approached this goddawful mess at and do that off kilter slide like folks in Detroit like to do on ice with their cars for half the year.

The civil authorites showed up pretty quick after that. Oh, there was a hell of a scramble scene too as they came in without sirens. I'd been playing "hide and seek" and "army" in this neighborhood since I was 5. No way did they come close to catching me or my brothers. Even better than knowing which yards do or don't have big dogs in them as you're hopping fences is knowing which yards have big dogs in them that know YOU.

Acts as a filter to pursuit.

This made me smile. It has a very familiar ring to it. We never had moldy potatoes but we made similar messes with pumpkins. Did you know you can slide on pavement with chunks of that stuff?

As with your friends and neighborhood, we too had every inch of ours mapped out. Most of us could easily run through it at night (this was thirty years ago when "night" meant it was dark out). There was one amusing time when a friend who was new to the neighborhood and I ran from an approaching police car. I led and ran between some houses, through the back yard, ducked under one of those wires that run from telephone poles down to the ground, and, of course, my friend, who was, as I mentioned, new to the neighborhood, forgot the wire was there and did not duck. He caught it under the chin and his momentum allowed him a full ninety degree swing, after which gravity took hold of him and dropped him flat on his back. Quite unfortunate for him. I, on the other hand, nearly threw up because I could not stop laughing. It was one of those rare laughs during which breathing is hard and your sides ache and death seems certain if you can't regain control soon. My friend was two years older than me and his threats to kill me if I didn't shut up only added to the humor of the situation.

When I think back on my friends and that neighborhood I can't help but think of the bar scene in Gremlins. We weren't quite that bad, but there's something about that scene I know I've lived through. The late seventies and early eighties were a very tense time for the residents on our street. Despite my comment about my friends' sisters in the previous post, the boys in that neighborhood outnumbered the girls five to one. I'm sure you can imagine the trouble such an imbalance can bring. With no voices of reason to temper our whims, we raised hell and raised it high.

FriedPhoton
2008-Apr-04, 12:52 AM
Ok, seriously? Grrrr!

p.s. there is no "s" in Lego!

p.s. I didn't have just one.

pzkpfw
2008-Apr-04, 04:25 AM
p.s. I didn't have just one.

One sheep.

Two sheep.

I have a box of Lego.

One cow.

Two cows.

I have a box of blocks.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Lego_website_brand_name_notice.png)

FriedPhoton
2008-Apr-04, 01:00 PM
One sheep.

Two sheep.

I have a box of Lego.

One cow.

Two cows.

I have a box of blocks.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Lego_website_brand_name_notice.png)


I'm trying to care... really... but in my entire life I have never encountered anyone who knew about or recognized this trivial distinction. As you will see, almost everyone on this thread has referred to more than one Lego as Legos. Yes, we know now it is incorrect, and we'll have to e-mail school teachers across the country to correct this and put an end to it once and for all, but I think we'll need a generation or two before the slang passes out of existence. Perhaps my grandchildren will read old writing from these days and smirk at our ignorance.

I also may have decided to attempt to modify my behavior had you not taken the approach of correcting me the way you did. Had you posted something, to nobody in particular, a "Here's an interesting bit of trivia..." and pointed it out I may have thought "Oh, I've been wrong about this my whole life. Everyone I've ever known has been wrong about this my whole life. I don't like being wrong, so I'll try to correct it". But now I feel a strange compulsion to call them Legos forever. It will make me feel rebellious... maybe I'll go buy a motorcycle too.

Get your motor runnin'
Head out on the highway
Lookin' for adventure
And whatever comes our way
Yeah Darlin' go make it happen
Take the world in a love embrace
Fire all of your guns at once
And explode into space

I like smoke and lightning
Heavy metal thunder
Racin' with the wind
And the feelin' that I'm under
Yeah Darlin' go make it happen
Take the world in a love embrace
Fire all of your guns at once
And explode into space

Like a true nature's child
We were born, born to be wild
We can climb so high
I never wanna die

Born to be wild
Born to be wild

pzkpfw
2008-Apr-04, 08:09 PM
I'm trying to care... really... but in my entire life I have never encountered anyone who knew about or recognized this trivial distinction.

I guess it's about where you live (see below).


As you will see, almost everyone on this thread has referred to more than one Lego as Legos. Yes, we know now it is incorrect, and we'll have to e-mail school teachers across the country to correct this and put an end to it once and for all, but I think we'll need a generation or two before the slang passes out of existence. Perhaps my grandchildren will read old writing from these days and smirk at our ignorance.

I also may have decided to attempt to modify my behavior had you not taken the approach of correcting me the way you did. Had you posted something, to nobody in particular, ...

I did (see below).


...a "Here's an interesting bit of trivia..." and pointed it out I may have thought "Oh, I've been wrong about this my whole life. Everyone I've ever known has been wrong about this my whole life. I don't like being wrong, so I'll try to correct it". But now I feel a strange compulsion to call them Legos forever. It will make me feel rebellious... maybe I'll go buy a motorcycle too.


Post 83 was addressed to no-one in particular.

Post 86 originally only echoed your "OK, seriously?" bit (for fun) and added the (hopefully obviously not-too-serious) "Grrr".

The "p.s" was added to Post 86 only after post 88 was made - that was perhaps unclear and I apologise for that. It did make the post look more "against" you in particular.

No offence was intended, this just happnes to be something that grates on my nerves. Wikipedia does mention that it's something those wacky Americans do (is the Event Horizon in the U.S.?) - maybe I should just leave you all alone.

(By the way, I care how "Lego" is used and also ride a bike [Kawasaki Z750S] - so I'm not sure your plan is all that rebellious.)

Neverfly
2008-Apr-04, 08:47 PM
I don't care if someone says Lego™®© or Legos.

I don't work for the company.

Some folks around here call any kind of soda a coke.

In a restaurant:

"And to drink?"
"I'd like a coke."
"Ok, what kind?"
"Pepsi."
It's insanity I tell you.

pzkpfw
2008-Apr-04, 10:08 PM
It's insanity I tell you.

That is insane, and it would annoy me.

I'd be nuts enough to try to tell people, too. ("Takes one to know one".)


Heck, I think there are people here who care where apostrophes go, too.

Neverfly
2008-Apr-04, 10:37 PM
Heck, I think there are people here who care where apostrophes go, too.

This is true...:whistle:

FriedPhoton
2008-Apr-04, 11:29 PM
I guess it's about where you live (see below).



I did (see below).



Post 83 was addressed to no-one in particular.

Post 86 originally only echoed your "OK, seriously?" bit (for fun) and added the (hopefully obviously not-too-serious) "Grrr".

The "p.s" was added to Post 86 only after post 88 was made - that was perhaps unclear and I apologise for that. It did make the post look more "against" you in particular.

No offence was intended, this just happnes to be something that grates on my nerves. Wikipedia does mention that it's something those wacky Americans do (is the Event Horizon in the U.S.?) - maybe I should just leave you all alone.

(By the way, I care how "Lego" is used and also ride a bike [Kawasaki Z750S] - so I'm not sure your plan is all that rebellious.)

To be perfectly honest, I understand how you feel, but for perhaps an entirely different reason. I dislike when people pronounce asterisk as asterick or asterix. The reason I dislike it is because I lived in central Wisconsin for a time and everyone there pronounced it asterick. Everyone. Even my college instructors. It drove me nuts. Why? I have no idea.

However, I don't recall ever correcting anyone. I probably should have called the governor or something... it's a real problem up there.

Neverfly
2008-Apr-04, 11:53 PM
To be perfectly honest, I understand how you feel, but for perhaps an entirely different reason. I dislike when people pronounce asterisk as asterick or asterix. The reason I dislike it is because I lived in central Wisconsin for a time and everyone there pronounced it asterick. Everyone. Even my college instructors. It drove me nuts. Why? I have no idea.

However, I don't recall ever correcting anyone. I probably should have called the governor or something... it's a real problem up there.

Yeah well, no one axed you how you fett 'bout it.

pzkpfw
2008-Apr-04, 11:55 PM
I'll xerox a poster about it.

Neverfly
2008-Apr-04, 11:58 PM
I'll xerox a poster about it.

We need several copies- so can you times it by ten?

FriedPhoton
2008-Apr-05, 01:05 AM
I'll xerox a poster about it.

I gots to get one!

Fledermaus
2008-Apr-06, 09:51 PM
[(By the way, I care how "Lego" is used and also ride a bike [Kawasaki Z750S] - so I'm not sure your plan is all that rebellious.)]

I dont care about lego I used to throw my kid brothers lego and legos in the fire when ever I found one laid around!! as they hurt when you stand on the horrid things with bare feet. I have a Kawasaki Z1000 in the garage at the moment but its getting sold as I dislike it, it doesnt handle round bends, looks ok, but I love my Honda Fireblade!!

Friedphoton, thats one of my favourite songs for when I am getting the bike out you fiend !!:D

One of my favourite toys is Action man, as he used to bring Sindy army gear to wear and take her out in the tank, and they used to drive over the Barbis and Kens that the powderpuff girls were playing with down the street! It was great as they used to howl and run away, so i could then pull the heads of the barbies as they were dead!!!:lol:

FriedPhoton
2008-Apr-07, 02:59 AM
One of my favourite toys is Action man, as he used to bring Sindy army gear to wear and take her out in the tank, and they used to drive over the Barbis and Kens that the powderpuff girls were playing with down the street! It was great as they used to howl and run away, so i could then pull the heads of the barbies as they were dead!!!:lol:

I think that you and my sister must be related somehow. She flat-out refused to play with Barbi and insisted upon GI Joe.

Someone mentioned making parachutes for GI Joe earlier in the thread didn't they? My friend and I used to make 'chutes from garbage bags and climb trees to toss them out.

Fledermaus
2008-Apr-07, 10:32 AM
I think that you and my sister must be related somehow. She flat-out refused to play with Barbi and insisted upon GI Joe.

Someone mentioned making parachutes for GI Joe earlier in the thread didn't they? My friend and I used to make 'chutes from garbage bags and climb trees to toss them out.

Oh I played with Barbi but only if she was to be a casulty with missing limbs, I didnt like the skinny faces. My other two sisters are also a bit like me they wanted the little bigmen( the special forces small men dolls) and the Bionic man, we also liked Streach Armstrong. He came in handy if the big lads came and tried to nick our toys, we would streach him out and swing him around and aim for their heads.Whoomph, they rarely came back for more; he hurt more when he was wet!!:lol: my brother found out how much when he pulled the hand of my action man! Your sister would have had a brill time if she had lived near us, did she build camps in the trees and swings? Why play with a pink fluffy skinny blond doll that you know you wont ever look like, when you can have mad adventure with a good looking guy that you might find for real one day? Also all the extras were more interesting like the guns, outfits, jeeps,helicopter,etc even the parachute which my brother had, but wouldnt let us use so we nicked my mutti's silk nighty out of the ironing pile and made some for our action men! They worked if you climbed a giant tree and got the height but not too good out of the bedroom windows in a two storey house. The trees were handy for when my mam found the remains of her nighty!!:cry: