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View Full Version : Cassini Survives Close Flyby of Enceladus



Fraser
2008-Mar-14, 02:00 PM
The Cassini spacecraft’s audacious flyby of Saturn's moon Enceladus on March 12 has provided scientists more information about the geyser-like jets of ice shooting from the moon’s southern hemisphere. It also highlighted the drastic geologic differences between the moon’s north and south pole. While the data collected from the geysers is still being [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/03/14/cassini-survives-close-flyby-of-enceladus/)

crosscountry
2008-Mar-14, 02:24 PM
Cassini was traveling about 15 kilometers per second (32,000 mph) through plumes from the geysers. The flyby was designed so that Cassini's particle analyzers could dissect the "body" of the plume for information on the density, size, composition and speed of the particles.


man, someone was thinking ahead. Was that the intended purpose of that instrument?

dhd40
2008-Mar-18, 08:24 PM
The Cassini spacecraft’s audacious flyby of Saturn's moon Enceladus on March 12 has provided scientists more information about the geyser-like jets of ice shooting from the moon’s southern hemisphere. It also highlighted the drastic geologic differences between the moon’s north and south pole. While the data collected from the geysers is still being [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/03/14/cassini-survives-close-flyby-of-enceladus/)

I can´t find any images taken from a distance of 50 km. Does anybody know where to find them?

01101001
2008-Mar-18, 09:07 PM
I can´t find any images taken from a distance of 50 km. Does anybody know where to find them?

I don't think they took any images at closest approach. The ground was whipping by too fast. It would only be a blur.

dhd40
2008-Mar-19, 11:32 AM
I don't think they took any images at closest approach. The ground was whipping by too fast. It would only be a blur.

Disappointing, if true. So the "only" purpose of that close approach was to analyse the jets´ composition?

I would have expected that Cassini´s rotation could be "sychronized" with Enceladus´ whipping to avoid blur. But I understand that Cassinis´speed of 15 km/s (relative to what?) might have been too fast.