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pghnative
2008-Mar-18, 09:52 PM
Just heard this on the radio (NPR News, WNYC) -- also shown as a banner on CNN, but no story to link to yet.

Swift
2008-Mar-18, 09:56 PM
Wow, that makes me sad. I'll have to go home and reread Rama now.

Casus_belli
2008-Mar-18, 09:58 PM
Oh dear. RIP Arthur. It was his books that got me into the whole astonomy/sci-fi thing

Disinfo Agent
2008-Mar-18, 09:59 PM
Oh, how sad! He wrote some of my favorite science fiction. :(

pghnative
2008-Mar-18, 10:02 PM
First story I've found (little details). I'd quote it, but would be hard to do without quoting entire story (currently three sentences). Presumably when details are added it can be found with the same link.

MSNBC Article Here (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23697230/)

KaiYeves
2008-Mar-18, 10:05 PM
I liked the part of "Mars and the Mind of Man" that he wrote, and I think it's cool that he was a scuba diver. Rest In Peace, under clear skies and clear waters.

Van Rijn
2008-Mar-18, 10:08 PM
Ah. *sigh* Another golden age author is gone. To be sure, he had a pretty long run, Jack Williamson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Williamson)is, off hand, the only one I can think of that had longer.

Alasdhair
2008-Mar-18, 10:18 PM
... has died (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7304004.stm), aged 90 in Sri Lanka.

01101001
2008-Mar-18, 10:19 PM
YouTube Sir Arthur C Clarke 90th Birthday reflections (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLXQ7rNgWwg), 2007 December 10, about 10 minutes, video message to his friends and fans, bidding them "good-bye"

peteshimmon
2008-Mar-18, 10:21 PM
Going out on a high with a shuttle mission
well underway. My yellow Gollancz editions
44 years ago indicated he was enjoying his
days in Minehead, Somerset. No, he was
ensconced in his Sri Lanka paradise.
Nice work Mr Clarke.

Jim
2008-Mar-18, 10:22 PM
Sad news.

And the BBC article is incorrect:
He came to fame when his story, 2001: A Space Odyssey, was made into a film by director Stanley Kubrick in 1968.

Clarke was famous long before Kubrick and he collaborated on 2001. Also, the story wasn't called that; it was "The Sentinel" and was the basis for 2001, not a direct transfer.

Anyway...

Sad news.

Jim
2008-Mar-18, 10:24 PM
Threads merged.

antoniseb
2008-Mar-18, 10:26 PM
I'm sad about this.

ToSeek
2008-Mar-18, 10:29 PM
I'm sad about this.

Absolutely. It's like the end of an era: the last of the "Big Three" sf writers to go.

zebo-the-fat
2008-Mar-18, 10:29 PM
Very sad news, he was an inspiration to many :sad:

jlhredshift
2008-Mar-18, 10:37 PM
Wow, that makes me sad. I'll have to go home and reread Rama now.

Very sad, I will reread Childhoods End.

He got me started as well.

Alasdhair
2008-Mar-18, 10:57 PM
The world is a smaller place.

Doodler
2008-Mar-18, 11:09 PM
I'd go back and read one of his books in memoriam, but the only one I have handy at the moment is 3001. Intellectual masochism just isn't my mood right now...

Needless to say, 90 is an awesome run, nothing at all to be depressed about. I'd consider myself lucky to go that long.

voyager_3
2008-Mar-18, 11:15 PM
RIP Arthur C. Clarke. I can remember when Arthur C. Clarke's Mysterious World was first shown on TV in the late 70's, I was only about 5 at the time and I was totally freaked out by the credits with the crystal "Skull of Doom" and the eerie theme music. That helped get in me to anything to do with space travel and the unexplained. I then got into many of his books when I was a teenager, 2001 is still my favourite.

I hope that before too long some of the things he wrote about will come to pass.

Paul Beardsley
2008-Mar-18, 11:16 PM
I am gutted. Really gutted.

I discovered his work when I was about 15, in 1978, and was hooked. It's had a major effect on my life.

I never met him, but I did meet his brother Fred in 2001. A very nice guy.

Somehow I knew he would die any day soon, but I'm not at all happy that it's finally happened. I did not want to be right.

redshifter
2008-Mar-18, 11:32 PM
Wow, this is indeed a sad moment. One of the authors who introduced me to Sci Fi when I was a young teenager. RIP Mr. Clarke, you will be missed and never forgotten.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Mar-19, 12:03 AM
I hope that before too long some of the things he wrote about will come to pass.
Well, since he is generally credited with the idea of the geosynchronous satellite, I'd say that's at least one thing he wrote about that came through big time.

danscope
2008-Mar-19, 12:07 AM
A good day to remember a great man and his legacy.

He brought realism to science fiction . His visions brought credibility to
paper and screen. He shall always be well remembered.

Best regards, Dan

Abbadon_2008
2008-Mar-19, 12:10 AM
See you on the other side, A.C. You will be missed.

Bearded One
2008-Mar-19, 12:45 AM
I just saw the news on CNN. It was a bit of a shock at first, was beginning to think he would live forever :(

One of the true greats in the genre, he helped put the science in science fiction.

ciderman
2008-Mar-19, 12:50 AM
Oh woe!
There be a wailing & gnashing of teeth in Somersetshire tonight. :(

However, some of this news was likely transmitted to me via a satellite in a Clarke orbit ;).

The first SF I ever read was Islands in the Sky.

Eta C
2008-Mar-19, 01:07 AM
Although it marks the passing of an era, 90 years of active life is, in many ways, a cause for a celebration of that life.

Although I too enjoyed Childhood's End and Rendezvous with Rama I always liked the modification to the US electoral system Clarke used in Imperial Earth. He noted that the selection of the US President was now done by lottery from a group of qualified candidates. The primary qualification was that the person selected have absolutly no desire to hold the post. He quotes a columnist of the time (2276 C.E.) as saying "We want a President who has to be carried screaming and kicking into the White House--but will then do the best job he possibly can, so that he'll get time off for good behaviour." Unfortunately a bit late to implement that clause this year.

filrabat
2008-Mar-19, 01:20 AM
Very sad indeed. I only read his Rama books, plus commentaries about his other writings. He truly was a visionary man, shining a flashlight on our future.

RIP, Robert

fotobits
2008-Mar-19, 01:36 AM
Although expected, this is indeed sad news. Clarke inspired many people, myself included.

Frantic Freddie
2008-Mar-19, 02:26 AM
I'd like to say somethin',but I'm havin' trouble seein' the keyboard.....

Ad Hominid
2008-Mar-19, 03:28 AM
You'ld be hard-pressed anyone with even a peripheral interest in astronomy or spaceflight who does not have at least several of ACC’s books on hand.

His Earthlight was the first serious SF book I ever read. It was tough going for an 8 year-old but I got through it and prepared a book report on it for my third grade class. My teacher gave me an “A” but smiled condescendingly and told me that I would eventually outgrow “all that science fiction stuff.”

That was in 1957 and it hasn’t happened yet.

Ad Hominid
2008-Mar-19, 03:41 AM
Arthur Clarke was a visionary who lived to see his vision fulfilled. I have often wondered what the experience was like for the early proponents of spaceflight, for the teenaged Clarke and others who joined the British Interplanetary Society back in the 1930s. They were basically a band of eccentrics, living with ridicule, indifference, and dismissal, only to see their ideas spectacularly vindicated in a remarkably short time.

JonClarke
2008-Mar-19, 07:42 AM
Sir Arthur is one of the half dozen writers who have most influenced my life. He will be missed, but not forgotten.

Jon

Paul Beardsley
2008-Mar-19, 08:17 AM
Having slept on it, I've decided to agree with Eta C - we should be celebrating his life.

I remember in one of his books which came out in the 1970s, he remarked that he had every intention of seeing what really happened in 2001. At the time, that sounded a bit optimistic... But when 2001 finally arrived, he was alive and reasonably well and lucid, with another seven years of active life ahead of him.

Finally, a friend of mine sent me the following quote from Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light:


Spare none of the rites. One of the highest has died this day.

Sticks
2008-Mar-19, 08:49 AM
Three tributes from the BBC website (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7304046.stm)

I wonder if the BBC will run the film 2001 A Space Odessey as a tribute?

:cry:

EvilBob
2008-Mar-19, 08:53 AM
Having slept on it, I've decided to agree with Eta C - we should be celebrating his life.

...

Finally, a friend of mine sent me the following quote from Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light:

Spare none of the rites. One of the highest has died this day.

That's about the most beautiful thing I've heard all day. Fighting back actual tears of sadness that one of the greatest writers has left us. We should be so thankful that he left such a large and wonderful legacy. The last line of Songs Of Distant Earth says it better than I could...

One day the pain would be gone; but never the memory.

JonClarke
2008-Mar-19, 09:13 AM
Let's not forget his many contributions beyond SF. To undersea exploration, maritime archaeology, education, popularisation of science, satellite communications, international peace and good will, to the very idea of space travel. We will remember him every time we hear of a satellite in Clarke orbit.

Jon

geonuc
2008-Mar-19, 09:27 AM
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

ACC

Tuckerfan
2008-Mar-19, 10:09 AM
Were there any justice in this universe, Mr. Clarke would have been worth at least as much as George Lucas is. (And can you imagine what that would be like?) :(

parallaxicality
2008-Mar-19, 11:09 AM
Sad he couldn't patent geosynchronous orbit the same way that biotech companies are patenting our genes. Then Lucas could have come begging to him.

Anyhoo. I'm not sad; yes, this is a melancholy milestone in the history of SF, as the Big Three finally depart our dimension. But Clarke was a great man who led an exemplary life; long, full, massively accomplished and, I hope, peacefully concluded. If one has to die, I'd say that's about as good a death as one could hope for.

Noclevername
2008-Mar-19, 11:42 AM
Goodbye, Sir Arthur. You changed the world.

Tuckerfan
2008-Mar-19, 11:56 AM
Sad he couldn't patent geosynchronous orbit the same way that biotech companies are patenting our genes. Then Lucas could have come begging to him.Actually, it wouldn't have mattered, as the first satellites went up after Clarke's patent would have expired. :(

scotsman
2008-Mar-19, 12:06 PM
I'm still trying to come to terms with the news , its been a couple of hours , and I still havn't been able to quite belive it

I stumbled on science fistion and Arthur's work at the same time, the school library had copies of Fall of Moondust , and 2001, and having read them I was hooked , and I've been that way ever since , and that's nearly 40 years now ..

The highlight of my life was reading Fountains of Paradise while on holiday in Sri Lanka, in many of the locations in the book .. a real joy ...

If you've only read the novels , try to find some of his short story collections from the 50's , funny inventive and very clever - really his golden age , and I can still remember reading Childhoods End in one sitting in my teens , and being scared and moved and excited all at once .. the way a book should make you feel ...

I will miss him .. and the quote from The Songs of Distant Earth is perfect -

Good Bye Arthur , and thanks for helping so many of us dream bigger and better dreams ...

Paul Beardsley
2008-Mar-19, 12:27 PM
Following Scotsman's example, it might be nice to share experiences of discovering the Great Man's work.

My own experience was in my teens, circa 1976. Having had my apetite whetted by the Viking landings, I was getting impatient waiting for all the space probles to reach their destinations - some were taking years! I thought I'd try reading a science fiction book set on another (real) planet to keep me going, but I'd read very little science fiction and didn't know much about it.

So I went to the library, and found a book called The Sands of Mars. It seemed to be a sensible book - not about rayguns and mad robots, but a realistic account of an ordinary person's mission to Mars.

I took it out, read it, and proceeded to read everything else I could find by Clarke, including the short stories, the semiautobiographical Glide Path, and a rather difficult book called Interplanetary Flight.

When Star Wars was released in 1977, I wondered if its success would cause cinemas to show 2001. As it turned out, it did, and so I got to see the film exactly a year after I'd read the book. (How we take it for granted that we can now just hire DVDs of anything we want to see.)

Happy days, and a major influence in my decision to pursue a side-line as an author.

Doodler
2008-Mar-19, 12:38 PM
Were there any justice in this universe, Mr. Clarke would have been worth at least as much as George Lucas is. (And can you imagine what that would be like?) :(

If 2001 is any indicator, somnolent to the point of comatose. If 2010 is any indicator, sadly dated and out of touch with reality.

By being divorced from visual references that create temporal associations with the time periods during which the movies are made, the books achieve a level of timelessness that the reader can put their own personal reference points in place to visualize, no matter when they read them.

With 2063 and 3001, the two books I recall most clearly, Clarke was largely ambiguous about the nature of most technology. Some points he got specific with, but he's largely careful about leaving the look of it to the mind of the reader.

Besides, since when did was monetary wealth the only indicator of success in life? The man's left a legacy that's shifted human understanding with regards to spaceflight and the human place in it. Not bad, despite the cruddy paycheck.

weatherc
2008-Mar-19, 01:17 PM
Absolutely. It's like the end of an era: the last of the "Big Three" sf writers to go.I thought the "Big Three" were Asimov, Bradbury, and Clarke.

Bradbury is still alive, as far as I know. Who was the third one that you were thinking of?

mugaliens
2008-Mar-19, 01:25 PM
I read many of his stories. Definately a visionary, yet enjoyable author.

ngc3314
2008-Mar-19, 01:29 PM
I thought the "Big Three" were Asimov, Bradbury, and Clarke.

Bradbury is still alive, as far as I know. Who was the third one that you were thinking of?

Heinlein, undoubtedly.

Clarke was one of my longtime favorite authors (the other later discovery having died almost 45 years ago now, on a day when the press was otherwise distracted). I discovered Clarke's work while in my pre-teens, and eventually made it a point to collect everything of his I could find. To me much of his effect was more poetic than anything else, despite the hardness of his whole approach to science fiction.

An era passes.

Doodler
2008-Mar-19, 01:30 PM
I thought the "Big Three" were Asimov, Bradbury, and Clarke.

Bradbury is still alive, as far as I know. Who was the third one that you were thinking of?

Probably Heinlein

mugaliens
2008-Mar-19, 01:30 PM
I thought the "Big Three" were Asimov, Bradbury, and Clarke.

Bradbury is still alive, as far as I know. Who was the third one that you were thinking of?

If I'm not mistaken, Heinlein has won more awards for his SF stories, sold more books, and is thus generally considered a more popular author.

Perhaps it should be "the big four," but then what about Roddenbury? While a filmmaker, not an author, his immensely successful Star Trek productions redefined SF for the masses. And if we include him, then Lucas should be up there, as well, as he did much the same thing.

Mister Earl
2008-Mar-19, 01:32 PM
When is the funeral? We need to send someone with a bouquet of satellite models. It seems more appropriate.

weatherc
2008-Mar-19, 01:36 PM
Heinlein, undoubtedly.Ah, that would make sense.

Unfortunately, I haven't read anything by him yet. However, I have read some of Clarke's work, in addition to work by Asimov and Bradbury.

Clarke will be missed, not only for his stories, but for his visionary outlook. At least we still have his works that we can read after his passing.

Jim
2008-Mar-19, 01:38 PM
NPR did two segments on Clarke. You can listen to them both here (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88552259).

The YouTube video message he recorded is here (www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qLdeEjdbWE).

Swift
2008-Mar-19, 01:45 PM
On top of all his great science fiction, he also wrote a very interesting book called "Profiles of the Future" in the early 60s that outlined some of his ideas about the history and future of science and technology. I don't recall particulars, but I remember reading it multiple times as a kid. He also had some great quotes (some from that book).

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
Arthur C. Clarke, "Profiles of The Future", 1961 (Clarke's third law)

When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
Arthur C. Clarke, Clarke's first law

The inspirational value of the space program is probably of far greater importance to education than any input of dollars... A whole generation is growing up which has been attracted to the hard disciplines of science and engineering by the romance of space.
Arthur C. Clarke, First on the Moon, 1970

If we have learned one thing from the history of invention and discovery, it is that, in the long run - and often in the short one - the most daring prophecies seem laughably conservative.
Arthur C. Clarke, The Exploration of Space, 1951

Mister Earl
2008-Mar-19, 02:08 PM
I want to recommend this thread to be stickied, for a period of about one week, while the BAUT community properly posts their condolences.

Paul Beardsley
2008-Mar-19, 03:50 PM
I want to recommend this thread to be stickied, for a period of about one week, while the BAUT community properly posts their condolences.

Seconded.

Jim
2008-Mar-19, 03:55 PM
It'll probably stay near the top anyway, but... why not. Stuck.

mike alexander
2008-Mar-19, 03:58 PM
At his best Clarke could be movingly poetic in the Stapledonian sense, invoking a sense of awe. My favorite quote of his comes (if I remember correctly) from The Challenge of the Space Ship:


While the race endures in recognizably human form, it can have no one abiding place short of the Universe itself.This divine discontent is one more, and perhaps the greatest, of the gifts we inherited from the sea that rolls so restlessly around the world.

It will be driving us onward, toward myriad unimaginable goals, when the seas are stilled forever and Earth itself is a fading legend lost among the stars.

Unless it's the closing line from Childhood's End, which now seems entirely appropriate:


No one dared disturb him or interrupt his thoughts: and presently he turned his back upon the dwindling Sun.

Ave atque vale, Sir Arthur.

Argos
2008-Mar-19, 04:42 PM
Clarke to have a secular funeral (http://edition.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/books/03/19/obit.clarke.ap/index.html).

Even after death, my admiration for this giant only grows.

Gillianren
2008-Mar-19, 05:14 PM
When I was in high school, he did an appearance in a made-for-TV movie that was intended to ape the Welles War of the Worlds.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0111735/

Maksutov
2008-Mar-19, 05:55 PM
Thank you, Mr. Clarke, for all your contributions to the knowledge and imagination of humanity. Their significance will be remembered and have impact as long as there are thinking people on this planet and elsewhere.

Thank you.

CodeSlinger
2008-Mar-19, 05:59 PM
Thank you, Sir, for turning so many eyes upward and outward.

tdvance
2008-Mar-19, 07:34 PM
I thought the "Big Three" were Asimov, Bradbury, and Clarke.

Bradbury is still alive, as far as I know. Who was the third one that you were thinking of?

"Bradbury"???? no way! (ok, he was pretty good, but didn't define the modern genre of science fiction the way Heinlein, Clark, and Asimov did).

Disinfo Agent
2008-Mar-19, 07:58 PM
On top of all his great science fiction, he also wrote a very interesting book called "Profiles of the Future" in the early 60s that outlined some of his ideas about the history and future of science and technology. I don't recall particulars, but I remember reading it multiple times as a kid.It's been republished a few times. The most recent edition seems to be from 2000. (http://www.amazon.com/Profiles-Future-Arthur-C-Clarke/dp/0575402776/ref=pd_bbs_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1205956616&sr=8-2)

Van Rijn
2008-Mar-19, 08:07 PM
If I'm not mistaken, Heinlein has won more awards for his SF stories, sold more books, and is thus generally considered a more popular author.

Perhaps it should be "the big four," but then what about Roddenbury? While a filmmaker, not an author, his immensely successful Star Trek productions redefined SF for the masses. And if we include him, then Lucas should be up there, as well, as he did much the same thing.

Roddenbery and Lucas weren't Golden Age science fiction writers. On the other hand, there were other great Golden Age authors, and if you pick three you're going to leave out somebody's favorite. Of course, I'd include Poul Anderson, but Heinlein, Clarke, and Asimov would have to be in any list of mine.

Tuckerfan
2008-Mar-19, 08:20 PM
If 2001 is any indicator, somnolent to the point of comatose. If 2010 is any indicator, sadly dated and out of touch with reality.

By being divorced from visual references that create temporal associations with the time periods during which the movies are made, the books achieve a level of timelessness that the reader can put their own personal reference points in place to visualize, no matter when they read them.

With 2063 and 3001, the two books I recall most clearly, Clarke was largely ambiguous about the nature of most technology. Some points he got specific with, but he's largely careful about leaving the look of it to the mind of the reader.

Besides, since when did was monetary wealth the only indicator of success in life? The man's left a legacy that's shifted human understanding with regards to spaceflight and the human place in it. Not bad, despite the cruddy paycheck.
My point was that if Clarke had gotten the zillions Lucas has, Clarke would have poured the bulk of his money into space exploration and scientific research and not redoing his old works or putting out less than stellar prequels.

JonClarke
2008-Mar-19, 10:01 PM
If 2001 is any indicator, somnolent to the point of comatose. If 2010 is any indicator, sadly dated and out of touch with reality.

2001 comatose? It is not an action piece, but reflective. if this is not your taste, fine. But others have different ones

of course 2010 is fated. This is inevitablee. But out of touch with reality? Hardly.


Besides, since when did was monetary wealth the only indicator of success in life? The man's left a legacy that's shifted human understanding with regards to spaceflight and the human place in it. Not bad, despite the cruddy paycheck.

He actually did very well out of writing (and from movie rights).

Jon

JonClarke
2008-Mar-19, 10:04 PM
My point was that if Clarke had gotten the zillions Lucas has, Clarke would have poured the bulk of his money into space exploration and scientific research and not redoing his old works or putting out less than stellar prequels.

What less than stellar requels do you refer to?

As for putting his money into worthwhile causes see http://www.clarkefoundation.org/

Jon

Sticks
2008-Mar-19, 10:51 PM
Looks like I need to get hold of 2001 on DVD

Opening (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWnmCu3U09w)

Dawn of man (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdoA3AJ6zGE) loved the bone turning into the space ship

The space station (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xZkLlNHo04)

I know he did other stuff, but it was through his 2001 A space odyssey that I discovered a love of classical music.

He will be sorely missed :cry:

Rue
2008-Mar-20, 12:29 AM
When I started to reading Heinlein books I was struck with the news that he had passed away. Later, I read Asimov and he too passed away.

Clarke has been the only one to survive my jinx. He survived through my readings of both his novels, short stories and essays. (and no I did not read anything by him recently!)

Often overlooked but no less a good read are Report on Planet 3 and Tales from Planet Earth. These are some of the best short sci-fi/essay books for those who do not have the time to read a full length novel.

One of the true masters of sci-fi and science education, he'll be missed.

Graybeard6
2008-Mar-20, 12:58 AM
While we're talking about "Golden Age" authors, let's not forget Fred Pohl. He's still turning out good stuff.

V_Zhd
2008-Mar-20, 03:01 AM
Its sad news, but I think we can all appreciate what he accomplished in his very productive life. I haven't read much of his work outside of the Space Odyssey series (which includes my favorite movie of all time), but maybe its time to give it a try.

ToSeek
2008-Mar-20, 03:09 AM
Actually, it wouldn't have mattered, as the first satellites went up after Clarke's patent would have expired. :(

I think he said something once about the idea being too far out to be patented when he came up with it. But by the time it became acceptable it was too late to patent it.

ToSeek
2008-Mar-20, 03:10 AM
I thought the "Big Three" were Asimov, Bradbury, and Clarke.

Bradbury is still alive, as far as I know. Who was the third one that you were thinking of?

Heinlein, as others have noted.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Mar-20, 03:30 AM
I think he said something once about the idea being too far out to be patented when he came up with it. But by the time it became acceptable it was too late to patent it.
Just so everyone can see how far out it was at the time, here's (http://www.clarkefoundation.org/docs/ClarkeWirelessWorldArticle.pdf) the actual October 1945 article. (pdf of the scanned article)

I think a lot of his knowledge of shortwave radio from his WWII radar work is shining though, it's almost as if it's the radio tech that's the interesting drive for the idea rather than the space tech.

01101001
2008-Mar-20, 05:20 AM
NASA Statement on the Death of Arthur C. Clarke (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2008/mar/HQ_08083_clarke_statement.html)


The following is a statement from Alan Stern, NASA associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at Headquarters in Washington, regarding the death of Arthur C. Clarke:

"Arthur Clarke was a gifted writer of science and science fiction, and an unparalleled visionary of the future, inspiring countless young people throughout the middle and later 20th century with his hopeful vision of how spaceflight would transform societies, economies, and humankind itself.

"Although his personal odyssey here on Earth is now over, his vision lives on through his writing; he will be sorely missed."

Tuckerfan
2008-Mar-20, 09:02 AM
What less than stellar requels do you refer to?
Well, some people are laboring under the illusion that Lucas wasn't killed in a tragic car accident shortly after the release of The Empire Strikes Back and went on to produce movies filled with things known as Ewoks, Jar Jar Binks, and midichlorians to name but a few. ;)

As for putting his money into worthwhile causes see http://www.clarkefoundation.org/

Jon
My point exactly. Had Clarke earned the billions (thereabouts) that Lucas has raked in, you can bet that a big portion of that money would have gone for the sciences. He probably would have bankrolled Rutan a decade or so before Paul Allen.

Tuckerfan
2008-Mar-20, 09:06 AM
Just so everyone can see how far out it was at the time, here's (http://www.clarkefoundation.org/docs/ClarkeWirelessWorldArticle.pdf) the actual October 1945 article. (pdf of the scanned article)

I think a lot of his knowledge of shortwave radio from his WWII radar work is shining though, it's almost as if it's the radio tech that's the interesting drive for the idea rather than the space tech.IIRC, he said that he was inspired for the idea because of problems he'd had with radio operation during the war. Heinlein wrote a short story which was inspired by his problems with radio when he was in the navy. (He was also paid bucket loads of money for it, as it was part of an ad for an electronics company. He talks about this in his Expanded Universe.)

AndreH
2008-Mar-20, 09:15 AM
Everything is already said above.

RIP.

Sean Clayden
2008-Mar-20, 12:16 PM
Now may all your questions be answered....

RIP

Doodler
2008-Mar-20, 12:29 PM
My point was that if Clarke had gotten the zillions Lucas has, Clarke would have poured the bulk of his money into space exploration and scientific research and not redoing his old works or putting out less than stellar prequels.

Yeah, sure, ok. Right...

Trantor
2008-Mar-20, 01:17 PM
He was a great man. I will have to dust off my Rama books, or maybe I will read the the only book from the "2001 series" that I haven't read yet; that was the last one, "3001", I believe. I guess we all have our time to go, and Clarke certainly accomplished much while here.

Trynn Allen
2008-Mar-20, 04:44 PM
I got my first ACC book in 1984, Feb I think. It was a thanks for coming gift from a friend of mine. Against the Fall of Night. The book was depressing, inspiring and confusing to a 6th grader. I kept reading. My brother got a collection of his short stories from the Weekly Reader book drives that would go on in the schools, and I stole it, looking for something of Mr. Clarkes that was bit different. The story that has stuck with me and has caused no end of arguements with my confirmation pastor was the story of the Jesuit Preist finding the Star of Christ. I can not recall the name of the story, I don't think it matters. What it meant to me and means to me I can't put words to.

Bolasanibk
2008-Mar-20, 05:09 PM
I got my first ACC book in 1984, Feb I think. It was a thanks for coming gift from a friend of mine. Against the Fall of Night. The book was depressing, inspiring and confusing to a 6th grader. I kept reading. My brother got a collection of his short stories from the Weekly Reader book drives that would go on in the schools, and I stole it, looking for something of Mr. Clarkes that was bit different. The story that has stuck with me and has caused no end of arguements with my confirmation pastor was the story of the Jesuit Preist finding the Star of Christ. I can not recall the name of the story, I don't think it matters. What it meant to me and means to me I can't put words to.

"The Star" , first appeared in Infinity Science Fiction , 1955.

As other have noted, the last of the great authors from the Golden Era. I have not read much of his novels, but this short stories are amazing. "The Rescue" being one of my favorites.

Paul Beardsley
2008-Mar-20, 05:09 PM
The story that has stuck with me and has caused no end of arguements with my confirmation pastor was the story of the Jesuit Preist finding the Star of Christ. I can not recall the name of the story, I don't think it matters. What it meant to me and means to me I can't put words to.

IIRC the title was simply "The Star".

Disinfo Agent
2008-Mar-20, 05:31 PM
It is The Star; you can find it for example in his anthology The Other Side of the Sky (see here (http://cage.rug.ac.be/~pvdecast/clarke.html)). One of his best short stories, IMHO. Ever read "The Nine Billion Names of God" (http://lucis.net/stuff/clarke/9billion_clarke.html)? ;) But Clarke was most often optimistic.


Looks like I need to get hold of 2001 on DVD

Opening (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWnmCu3U09w)Oh, some folks have posted something I've always thought of doing! If you like 2001: A Space Odyssey and Pink Floyd, click here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aunoKAz6Mc&feature=related). :cool: The only way to listen to Pink Floyd. ;)

P.P.S. This montage (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TIEweJ_AQQ) is good, too.

Tobin Dax
2008-Mar-20, 11:01 PM
You'ld be hard-pressed anyone with even a peripheral interest in astronomy or spaceflight who does not have at least several of ACC’s books on hand.
You've found one. Though I do admit that my library is small. I've read all four books in the 2001 series, some short stories, and his book with Stephen Baxter. I always liked Asimov better, but the death of the second-best science writer saddens me more than I've realized.


Besides, since when did was monetary wealth the only indicator of success in life? The man's left a legacy that's shifted human understanding with regards to spaceflight and the human place in it. Not bad, despite the cruddy paycheck.
Quoted for truth.

01101001
2008-Mar-20, 11:45 PM
I don't have several.

I don't have one.

I don't have any science fiction.

I prefer nonfiction.

ToSeek
2008-Mar-21, 01:23 AM
If you had asked me as a teenager what reading Arthur C. Clarke felt like, I would have said: “Having my brain pried open and the Universe poured in.” After reading some of his short stories last night, I would say my teenage self had it spot on.

- http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article3587167.ece

Paul Beardsley
2008-Mar-21, 12:02 PM
I don't have any science fiction.

I prefer nonfiction.
Out of interest, do you read any fiction?

Doodler
2008-Mar-21, 12:28 PM
2001 comatose? It is not an action piece, but reflective. if this is not your taste, fine. But others have different ones.

That level of reflectivity requires a scoche more narrative than a movie with 45 minutes of dialogue over the course of two hours provides.




He actually did very well out of writing (and from movie rights).

Jon
I imagine he did, just not at the level of a Lucas or a Spielberg.

JonClarke
2008-Mar-21, 10:30 PM
That level of reflectivity requires a scoche more narrative than a movie with 45 minutes of dialogue over the course of two hours provides.

Blame that on Kubrick, not Clarke! :)


I imagine he did, just not at the level of a Lucas or a Spielberg.

True, but then U suspect he had more fun and did more good with his money. And had a bigger long term impact.

cheers

Jon

danscope
2008-Mar-22, 12:34 AM
Gentlemen, The whole point of great science fiction is to stimulate thought
.......and not to lead you by the nose and "THINK" for you. This is precisely why
2001 /2010 are such great works. Some of the most aspiring teachers need a good pair of handcuffs. I E you need to stimulate the concious mind and the subconcious, and allow the freedom of interpretation to further whet the appetite for the genre. Most of the people I have disccused this with agreed readily that Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick , in being frugal with the dialogue, made a much better picture, richer by far in experience for so many reasons, and continues to generate interest as it continues to give us credit for being smart enough to think for our selves.

Best regards, Dan

Tuckerfan
2008-Mar-23, 01:45 PM
User Friendly's tribute. (http://ars.userfriendly.org/cartoons/?id=20080323) *sniff*

Mister Earl
2008-Mar-25, 03:51 PM
I wonder if we can somehow petition to get that biggest-GRB-ever seen renamed to the "Arthur C. Clarke memorial gamma ray burst". A fitting tribute. The "Clarke burst" for short. Just a thought.

Tuckerfan
2008-Mar-25, 04:01 PM
Well, NASA's looking for a new name for the GLAST (http://glast.sonoma.edu/glastname/), how's about the Arthur C. Clarke Telescope?

Mister Earl
2008-Mar-26, 07:07 PM
The GLAST is nice and all, but I think Mr. Clarke is worth "the biggest boom and brightest flash from the greatest distance ever recorded in the history of civilization!" :)

Robert Tulip
2008-Mar-28, 12:31 AM
Arthur C. Clarke
Mar 27th 2008
From The Economist print edition
http://www.economist.com/obituary/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10918055

Sir Arthur C. Clarke, visionary, died on March 18th, aged 90

ALTHOUGH he dreamed and wrote about it constantly for 70 years, Arthur C. Clarke never voyaged into space. ...

His epitaph for himself would have well suited man as he wanted him to be. “He never grew up; but he never stopped growing.”

ToSeek
2008-Mar-28, 04:49 PM
While no mourning period is fully adequate, it's been ten days, so I've unstuck this thread.

Nadme
2008-Apr-01, 10:00 PM
I first checked out/read 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1999 [though saw the film years earlier on VHS]. The librarian's name was Hal. No kidding.

clint
2008-Apr-01, 10:23 PM
Arthur C. Clarke
Mar 27th 2008
From The Economist print edition
http://www.economist.com/obituary/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10918055


Some predictions, from the same article:

By the 2020s he thought it likely that artificial intelligence would reach human level, dinosaurs would be cloned, and neurological research into the senses would mean that mankind could bypass information from the ears, eyes and skin. By 2050, he said, millions of bored human beings would freeze themselves in order to emigrate into the future to find adventure.
:think:

Neverfly
2008-Apr-01, 10:53 PM
Some predictions, from the same article:

By the 2020s he thought it likely that artificial intelligence would reach human level, dinosaurs would be cloned, and neurological research into the senses would mean that mankind could bypass information from the ears, eyes and skin. By 2050, he said, millions of bored human beings would freeze themselves in order to emigrate into the future to find adventure.
:think:

The irony is that had we actively pursued cloning technology or crygenics or A.I. we might have been able to achieve a lot of that within this century (Not too far off Dr. Clark.)
Dino DNA would be very hard to get, map and clone- but I wouldn't write off the idea as impossible either.
We've advanced a great deal in some of these but....

The moral implications also tend to jump in too.
It frightens many people- the idea of Cloning etc. Many see cloning as "playing God."

Same with A.I. Even if we could achieve it- would we?
It seems hard to actively pursue research in the field due to fears.

clint
2008-Apr-02, 12:48 PM
The irony is that had we actively pursued cloning technology or crygenics or A.I. we might have been able to achieve a lot of that within this century (Not too far off Dr. Clark.)
Dino DNA would be very hard to get, map and clone- but I wouldn't write off the idea as impossible either.
We've advanced a great deal in some of these but....

The moral implications also tend to jump in too.
It frightens many people- the idea of Cloning etc. Many see cloning as "playing God."

Same with A.I. Even if we could achieve it- would we?
It seems hard to actively pursue research in the field due to fears.

I think eventually we will pursue both (cloning and AI).
Although the concerns seem to prevail in some parts of the world,
they are probably just the typical short-term reaction to any ground-breaking new technology.

Once people start to see practical benefits, they will likely accept it.
Remember the angst-ridden scenarios about a dehumanized computer-controlled world in the 80s?
Now everybody happily uses PC and Internet ;)

Also, there are other parts of the world who have much fewer qualms about these new areas of research.
There might even be a scientific 'arms race' in the making, once they launch their first 'sputnik'...

Jim
2008-Apr-02, 01:14 PM
Remember the angst-ridden scenarios about a dehumanized computer-controlled world in the 80s?
Now everybody happily uses PC and Internet.

The latter statement does not disprove the former. Actually, the former seems to be coming true. There are many companies that have adopted "Email Free Fridays" or some such to force the human contact that technology has taken away.

Heck, look at what we're doing, communicating by PC and Internet. Yet, we've never met, and probably never will. For all either of us knows, the other is an AI, a software program cleverly putting together random words in a way that makes intellect.

You can't really be anodic, can you?

Paul Beardsley
2008-Apr-02, 01:33 PM
For all either of us knows, the other is an AI, a software program cleverly putting together random words in a way that makes intellect.
Clint seems to be real enough.

But I wonder if some of the HBs who come here are not-so-clever AI programs?

printf("I don't care what you say, there's no way ");

switch(RND(10))
{
case 1: printf("that a human can pass through the Van Allen belt without being fried.\n");
break;
case 2: printf("you can account for the waving flag.\n");
break;
case 3: printf("1960s computing power was up to the job. Why, my pocket calculator was more powerful than blah blah blah...\n");
break;
default: printf("etc\n");
}


You can't really be anodic, can you?
What does that mean?

Jim
2008-Apr-02, 02:36 PM
Trying to be too cute.

Intellect = sense; anodic = positive. As if an AI were doing it but didn't get the precise word.

I will go play in my room now.

KaiYeves
2008-Apr-02, 08:43 PM
I first checked out/read 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1999 [though saw the film years earlier on VHS]. The librarian's name was Hal. No kidding.
Freird.
(Freaky+Weird=Freird)