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Tone Deaf
2008-Mar-27, 01:34 PM
As in the title. With the different atmosphere, temperature, and weather. What would the wind sound like on Mars? Are there recordings available from the surface of Mars?

John Mendenhall
2008-Mar-27, 02:31 PM
As I recall, that first probe on the surface transmitted back the wind sounds of Mars. I don't remember the name of the probe, or even when. If I get enough time, I'll look it up and post here. It was eerie, listening to the sound, recognizably wind noise, and knowing that it was not of Earth.

Tone Deaf
2008-Mar-27, 03:20 PM
Thank you. After reading your post I had a bit of a google search, but came up with nothing. I did find sounds from Titan though.

Nadme
2008-Mar-27, 03:26 PM
As I recall, that first probe on the surface transmitted back the wind sounds of Mars. I don't remember the name of the probe, or even when. If I get enough time, I'll look it up and post here. It was eerie, listening to the sound, recognizably wind noise, and knowing that it was not of Earth.

Viking, 1970s? I'd like to hear that as well. :) I'm "into" Mars, but didn't know a sound clip was available of its winds.

I have heard speculation as to what a human voice would sound like on Mars; definitely thin and perhaps even a bit tremorous.

Larry Jacks
2008-Mar-27, 03:37 PM
The only vehicle that I know had a microphone on it was the Mars Polar Lander (http://www.cnn.com/TECH/space/9911/01/mars.microphone/index.html). Unfortunately, that vehicle crashed.

01101001
2008-Mar-27, 03:47 PM
The only vehicle that I know had a microphone on it was the Mars Polar Lander (http://www.cnn.com/TECH/space/9911/01/mars.microphone/index.html). Unfortunately, that vehicle crashed.

Perhaps atmospheric sound recalled is: Huygens at Titan. Planetary Society: The Huygens "Microphone" (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/cassini_huygens/huygens_microphone.html)

See The Mars Microphone :: Test Sound Data (http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/marsmic/sound/testdata.html)
and
The Mars Microphone :: Sound (http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/marsmic/sound.html)


Sound on the surface of Mars is expected to be similar to that on Earth, except much fainter because the atmospheric pressure is much less than on Earth. Martian atmospheric pressure is about 7 millibars (as on Earth, this is altitude-dependent), which is less than 1% of the Earth's. The below example shows how this difference in pressure affects sound. The first sound is a recording of a person coughing, and the second, how this would sound on the Martian surface.
Coughing on Earth
Coughing on Mars
To hear the sound samples and to see their respective sound spectrograms, please click on the links on the right menu bar. All sound samples are about 100k.


[From Home] The original Mars Microphone instrument was constructed for the ill-fated NASA Mars Polar Lander (MPL) mission, which lost contact with Earth shortly after its descent to the Martian surface and was never recovered. Nevertheless, during the MPL mission we demonstrated that a low-cost (<$100,000), small (25 cc) and lightweight (50g) instrument could be constructed for a major NASA planetary mission.

Interest in the Mars Microphone project was so intense that immediately following the loss of MPL, a second opportunity to fly the microphone experiment was provided by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French space agency, on the NetLander mission to Mars in 2007. NetLander will land four small identical landers on Mars to study the atmosphere and the planetary subsurface and interior core. The Mars Microphone experiment is currently being redesigned to fit within the camera head of the NetLander probes being built by the German space agency (DLR).

And that was canceled. Some day...

Larry Jacks
2008-Mar-27, 03:50 PM
I just did some checking and found out that there is a microphone on the Mars Phoenix mission as part of the MARDI package. Unfortunately, the MARDI package won't be operating (http://www.msss.com/msl/mardi/news/12Nov07/index.html) during the descent due to some form of compatability issue. MARDI was designed to return descent photos to help locate the lander. From what little I've read, the microphone was designed to record sounds during the descent.

For those who were also expecting to hear audio from the MARDI's microphone, this decision also eliminates that possibility.

I have no idea of whether the microphone could be used after landing but it doesn't seem to be the case. Pity.

John Mendenhall
2008-Mar-27, 05:03 PM
Again, if I recall correctly, they weren't doing it through a microphone, but through another wind sensitive instrument, although I don't recall what. Aneometer, maybe? Viking sounds right, perhaps one of the (older) NASA people might remember. And having kicked it around for a while now, I wonder if it was on a record? Vinyl, of course, it was a long time ago.

RalofTyr
2008-Mar-28, 05:41 AM
The only vehicle that I know had a microphone on it was the Mars Polar Lander (http://www.cnn.com/TECH/space/9911/01/mars.microphone/index.html). Unfortunately, that vehicle crashed.

That was a disapointment

They had mission control at my college and the Astrobiology society and I were very eager to have a listen. I was down when it didn't transmitt when it should. I still remember that day.

To hear the sound of Mar's wind, well, you'd be inside your helmet or capsule, and the low pressure probably transmitts very little sound audiable to the human ear, so the only sound of Martian wind would be the little grains of dust hitting your helmet or window.

EvilEye
2008-Mar-29, 03:27 PM
You need (air)pressure for a diaphram to work correctly, so recording real sounds on Mars would be difficult for us or a microphone to hear. We would all be nearly deaf on Mars.

KaiYeves
2008-Mar-29, 05:16 PM
Vinyl, of course, it was a long time ago.
Not really that long ago in the scheme of things.

astromark
2008-Mar-29, 07:34 PM
You need (air)pressure for a diaphragm to work correctly, so recording real sounds on Mars would be difficult for us or a microphone to hear. We would all be nearly deaf on Mars.

Amplification of sound would reveal what you would expect. The sound of Martian dust hitting the body of your sound recording device. Just a few more years and you will know this sound. Its on the agenda as things to do.