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View Full Version : Non-destrutive detection of Antimatter?



Reverend J
2008-Mar-29, 07:20 PM
Just a quick question floating around in my head lately. Is there any way to detect antimatter that doesn't involve it colliding with matter and becoming energy?

I figure that spectroscopic methods like IR, or UV-Vis, or the like wouldn't be able to tell matter and antimatter apart. So, is there anything else someone could do to figure it out, or do you just have to wait for stuff to collide and see the results?

antoniseb
2008-Mar-29, 08:29 PM
We see non destructive evidence of antimatter all the time. In the big detectors in our particle colliders we see tracks of anti-particles as they whizz away from collisions.

trinitree88
2008-Mar-29, 09:21 PM
Ok. I'm offering up the first Glaser Prize, in honor of Donald Howard Glaser, inventor of the Bubble Chamber. While sitting contemplating his beer..(so the story goes)...he noticed that the bubbles that rise to the surface, nucleate repetitively at the same sites, and inferred that imperfections in the glass cause it. (he was right) Expediently, he jumped to the conclusion that one might use a liquid...say hydrogen, near it's boiling point under pressure, to nucleate ionization trails from particle showers. To facilitate seeing them a flash system was coordinated with bursts of particles, and a pressure oscillation was induced to help eradicate old trails and reset the chamber for new ones.
So, if you're participating in having a few beers this weekend, there's a snowball's chances in Hell, Montana...that as you watch your beer bubbles, a stray cosmic ray will create a particle/antiparticle pair. If you catch it on your cellphone camera...there's a ten buck prize (whoopie-do..I am a starving schoolteacher...:D..) the first Glaser International. Now you have an excellent reason to be sending people pictures of the beer before you...it's strictly in the interest of science. I have seen at least one stray cosmic ray, or background event in a beer many years ago, but no divergence trails. pete

P.S. Merlot wine does not work, but I'll keep mine anyway.


see:http://sciencematters.berkeley.edu/archives/volume1/issue6/legacy.php

FriedPhoton
2008-Mar-29, 11:34 PM
Ok. I'm offering up the first Glaser Prize, in honor of Donald Howard Glaser, inventor of the Bubble Chamber. While sitting contemplating his beer..(so the story goes)...he noticed that the bubbles that rise to the surface, nucleate repetitively at the same sites, and inferred that imperfections in the glass cause it. (he was right) Expediently, he jumped to the conclusion that one might use a liquid...say hydrogen, near it's boiling poiint under pressure, to nucleate ionization trails from particle showers. To facilitate seeing them a flash system was coordinated with bursts of particles, and a pressure oscillation was induced to help eradicate old trails and reset the chamber for new ones.
So, if you're participating in having a few beers this weekend, there's a snowball's chances in Hell, Montana...that as you watch your beer bubbles, a stray cosmic ray will create a particle/antiparticle pair. If you catch it on your cellphone camera...there's a ten buck prize (whoopie-do..I am a starving schoolteacher...:D..) the first Glaser International. Now you have an excellent reason to be sending people pictures of the beer before you...it's strictly in the interest of science. I have seen at least one stray cosmic ray, or background event in a beer many years ago, but no divergence trails. pete

P.S. Merlot wine does not work, but I'll keep mine anyway.


see:http://sciencematters.berkeley.edu/archives/volume1/issue6/legacy.php

I have heard, but am not certain it is true, that some beer glasses have now been designed to take advantage of this effect. The last time I had a draft beer I watched a nice little stream of bubbles continuously flowing in single file, from one point on the bottom of the glass. I doubt that glass was designed to do so, but it was very cool to watch that stream of bubbles flow. But then I'm easily amused by such things. I see the fractal nature of soap bubbles and find myself amazed.

Reverend J
2008-Mar-31, 01:42 AM
We see non destructive evidence of antimatter all the time. In the big detectors in our particle colliders we see tracks of anti-particles as they whizz away from collisions.

I was thinking more like if you look at objects in space is there a way to determine if it's matter or antimatter. Though particle colliders are cool.

trinitree88
2008-Mar-31, 06:26 PM
I was thinking more like if you look at objects in space is there a way to determine if it's matter or antimatter. Though particle colliders are cool.

Reverend. Spectroscopically, no. Only annihilation gamma rays from electron/positron pairs indicate some spots with antimatter, not whole galaxies. pete