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HypothesisTesting
2008-Apr-01, 05:14 PM
Linda Howe of CTC fame in March gave a report that scientists in Kobe University will be presenting a paper in April issue of Astrophysical Journal
called "an outer planet beyond Pluto and origin of trans-Neptunian archetecture".

This paper should present evidence of a planet the mass of earth at 100 AU which causes perturbations in about 1000 transNeptunian objects.

Have any BAUT people heard any buzz about this one?

01101001
2008-Apr-01, 05:34 PM
Have any BAUT people heard any buzz about this one?

Some. At least among them are:

Article in topic New evidence for 2012 TEOTWAWKI!!! (http://www.bautforum.com/1185657-post24.html)
Article in topic NIBURU - Brown Dwarf, The DESTROYER (http://www.bautforum.com/1185204-post224.html)
Topic A mainstream take on Planet X? (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/70929-mainstream-take-planet-x.html)

Commander Thrawn
2008-Apr-02, 02:34 AM
I was recently reading an article about it.

Abbadon_2008
2008-Apr-02, 03:46 PM
planet the mass of earth at 100 AU which causes perturbations in about 1000 transNeptunian objects.


I'm always curious when people talk about 'perturbations' of objects a zillion miles away, when referencing a heretofore unknown body -- Planet X, for example. Especially when they're talking about minor things like asteroids. How much info could there be possibly be on a nondescript hunk of rock half a LY form Earth, upon which to base the assumption that's being 'perturbed' by something as yet to be identified?

Yes, I know we have photos of many objects, and satellites monitoring other objects. But if there's a frozen hunk of debris so far out that it takes literally centuries to orbit our system, then how do we really know it's 'perturbed' by anything?

Maybe it's just being jostled around by other frozen bits of debris. If there are over 1000 objects being tracked, for instance, they might be perturbing each other. They all have varying mass, size, and are probably moving at different speeds, too.

I'm not criticizing the tech-heads. I'm just trying to get a handle on this.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Apr-03, 07:50 AM
Couldn't find the reference, but I've seen numbers saying the average distance between objects out there are comparable to the distance between Saturn and the Earth.
Jostling's going to be extremely rare, so when things don't move as expected it's not the most likely explanation.

AndreasJ
2008-Apr-03, 03:23 PM
Let's abuse the back of an envelope ...

The space within lightyear of the Sun is ~3.51039 km3 (of which the region inside Neptune's orbit makes up essentially nothing whatsoever). If there's ten trillion (1013) cometary bodies large than 1 km across out there (order-of-magnitude estimate from Wikipedia), each of them has a stupendous 3.51026 km3 of space to itself. Assuming them to be evenly distributed the typical distance between nearest neighbours approaches 109 km, which is comparable with the Sun-Saturn distance (about 1.5109 km).

HypothesisTesting
2008-Apr-03, 04:15 PM
I'm not criticizing the tech-heads. I'm just trying to get a handle on this.


I don't know what the paper will say either. My guess is that they will say that the present "architecture" of transNeptunian objects can only be due to an earth-sized body positioned 100 AU from sun. We'll have to see when they publish it specifically.

Maha Vailo
2008-Apr-03, 11:06 PM
Even if the paper realy did say there was an Earth-size object at that distance, it's effect on Earth would be minimal unless it somehow jostled some debris into a comet-like orbit. As has been mentioned above, the possiblity of that happening is remote.

Move along Planet X-ers, there's nothing to see here.

- Maha Vailo

HypothesisTesting
2008-Apr-07, 03:45 PM
Even if the paper realy did say there was an Earth-size object at that distance, it's effect on Earth would be minimal unless it somehow jostled some debris into a comet-like orbit. As has been mentioned above, the possiblity of that happening is remote.

Move along Planet X-ers, there's nothing to see here.

- Maha Vailo

This would be my impression also. I'll just have to read that paper when it comes out, but my guess is that not all astronomers will accept it at once.