PDA

View Full Version : Physics in Hollywoodland



NEOWatcher
2008-Apr-04, 03:11 PM
I know calling this a space story is a bit of a stretch...#6 is about sound in space. But; we've spent a lot of time on this sort of thing, so...
Physics in Hollywoodland (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23943370)

Catch cinema's most mind-boggling moments in scientific inaccuracy
I'd like to know what makes these 10 things the most mind-boggling.

And; are they considering the context? In other words, is it done for effect, or is it done because that's the story, and is it meant to depict reality to begin with.
Like anyone really believes the bubble scene in Willy Wonka is possible. :naughty:

HenrikOlsen
2008-Apr-04, 03:35 PM
#10 is about 2001, so definitely space related.

A silly part is that at least two of those ten aren't inaccuracies, but are actually accurate, as they even say.

NEOWatcher
2008-Apr-04, 04:19 PM
#10 is about 2001, so definitely space related.

A silly part is that at least two of those ten aren't inaccuracies, but are actually accurate, as they even say.
Yep... I went on to actually read them after I posted. I thought it was bad enough without diving deep into the article.

#8 Doesn't exactly say anything except how the physics works. Do they actually relate it to how accurate it is in the movie?

And #10


Oh, and this film portrays the silence of space better than any other I've seen. Bravo.

Wow; it must really seriously be inaccurate...:wall:

Gillianren
2008-Apr-04, 04:59 PM
Wow, that site hates my browser. I suspect it wants me to be using IE; can't imagine why.

It's like the historically-inaccurate list we went through earlier--okay, I'll give them a couple of those, notably Armageddon and The Day After Tomorrow. But where's The Core?

suntrack2
2008-Apr-04, 05:05 PM
oh! its really funtastic topic here. certainly the physics work out in the hollywood to get the density of a matter. I heard that hollywood is the best place in this world. distance/speed/action/reaction/wavelength/voice/gravity all things are appropriately work out in hollywood.

Maha Vailo
2008-Apr-05, 08:01 AM
Hmmm. Well, it does answer my question about dropping a cubic mile of upper troposphere down to the ground. It wouldn't freeze people, but instead be more like a desert wind.

Now, a sudden blast of air at 137 degrees F probably wouldn't burn anyone, but could it cause heat exhaustion in one exposed to it?

- Maha "Hollywood heat" Vailo

suntrack2
2008-Apr-05, 11:26 AM
Hmmm. Well, it does answer my question about dropping a cubic mile of upper troposphere down to the ground. It wouldn't freeze people, but instead be more like a desert wind.

Now, a sudden blast of air at 137 degrees F probably wouldn't burn anyone, but could it cause heat exhaustion in one exposed to it?

- Maha "Hollywood heat" Vailo


I like this reply very much.

Jim
2008-Apr-07, 01:23 PM
They're dissing Willy Wonka?! Oh, good grief. That movie wasn't trying for an accurate representation, but a fanciful one. Why not use a movie that really thinks it's being accurate, like, oh, maybe, The Core*?



(*with acknowledgment to Gillian)

Inferno
2008-Apr-16, 06:09 AM
Speed - Isn't there some excuse given in the film why the bus will leap over the gap. I think its pretty lame, but I'm sure they did try to give a reason.

Kebsis
2008-Apr-23, 12:50 AM
Yep... I went on to actually read them after I posted. I thought it was bad enough without diving deep into the article.

#8 Doesn't exactly say anything except how the physics works. Do they actually relate it to how accurate it is in the movie?

And #10

Wow; it must really seriously be inaccurate...:wall:

They say that Hackmans mesh is particularly fine and should work well for keeping out unwanted transmissions and spying and whatnot. And it doesn't say that 2001 is inacurrate, they say it is very acurrate. Why they would put these two examples of good physics in a list about bad physics is beyond my puny mortal understanding though.

mike alexander
2008-Apr-23, 08:56 PM
For interesting physics of motor vehicle flight nothing beats The Blues Brothers, where Elwood not only manages to flip the Bluesmobile end-for-end but also gives it a half-twist on the long axis in the process.

But then, he was On A Mission From God.

Krel
2008-Apr-23, 09:36 PM
For interesting physics of motor vehicle flight nothing beats The Blues Brothers, where Elwood not only manages to flip the Bluesmobile end-for-end but also gives it a half-twist on the long axis in the process.

But then, he was On A Mission From God.

Good observation. Remember, after the mission was over the car fell apart. :lol:

David.

NEOWatcher
2008-Apr-24, 12:59 PM
For interesting physics of motor vehicle flight nothing beats The Blues Brothers, ...
I think we can add the amount of atmospheric drag on a Ford Pinto with that.

Alasdhair
2008-Apr-24, 01:40 PM
Well, that roadway was apparently higher than the Sears Tower: no wonder it wasn't finished...

mike alexander
2008-Apr-25, 01:03 AM
Yes. Everybody looks at Star Wars or Armegeddon, but the suspension of physicochemical laws in TBB can hold its own with any of them (e.g., the magically cleaning suits Jake and Elwood wear, the all night chase at high speed to cover the 105 miles to Chicago, etc.).

Krel
2008-Apr-25, 05:02 PM
Normal physical laws don't apply in the "The Blues Brothers". As Mike Alexander pointed out, they were on a mission from God, so divine intervention must be taken into account. :lol:

David.

novaderrik
2008-Apr-26, 03:53 AM
Normal physical laws don't apply in the "The Blues Brothers". As Mike Alexander pointed out, they were on a mission from God, so divine intervention must be taken into account. :lol:

David.
and they had cop car tires, cop car suspension, and a cop car engine....

novaderrik
2008-Apr-26, 04:03 AM
i figured out the bus thing from Speed- that whole movie was just Neo having dream (or just a glitch in the matrix) before he knew he was in the matrix, so anything could happen.