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NEOWatcher
2008-Apr-17, 03:13 PM
Foreclosures seem to be causing everything nowadays.

Forclosures raise West Nile risk (http://www.ktvu.com/news/15908915/detail.html)
:eek:

Yep; we all know the dangers of standing water and mosquitos and such.

Just how much of a mosquito poplulation increase can be attributed to these foreclosed swimming pools?

sarongsong
2008-Apr-18, 05:59 AM
Sounds like common sense to me...
..."Mosquitoes can reproduce hundreds of thousands of times in one pool, and they can fly at about a 5-mile radius."...
...a total estimate of 477,000 single-family homes with swimming pools in MWD service...
Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:hewDiH20CL8J:www.owue.water.ca.gov/docs/2003Apps/PSP2003018.pdf+%22total+number+of+swimming+pools+i n+california%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=10&gl=us&client=opera)

geonuc
2008-Apr-18, 11:08 AM
I've heard that this is a fairly serious problem.

logic.exe
2008-Apr-18, 12:37 PM
Holy crap. I've heard that just leaving buckets of still water lying around could increase the danger posed by mosquitoes, I shudder to think of the damage that could be caused by a significant amount of abandoned pools.

What further complicates matters is that you typically can't completely drain a pool without causing expensive damage to the pool liner.

Quick question, how quickly could mosquitoes form a resistance to the pesticides they're using? It it something we have to seriously consider in the short term? Short as in the next couple of years?

aurora
2008-Apr-18, 02:08 PM
I think if I lived near an abandoned pool, I would get some of the little tablets that float and prevent misquitoes from breeding, and throw a few of them in the pool.

Swift
2008-Apr-18, 02:24 PM
There is another aspect to this. I have read (Cleveland Plain Dealer for one) that particularly in hard hit areas, within a day or two of the house being officially foreclosed (family out, signs up, boarded up) that thieves are breaking into the houses and stripping them of anything they can sell - appliances, the copper pipes, aluminum siding, etc. In many cases, they don't even bother turning off the water to strip the pipes, and pretty quickly you have a house filled with feet of water. That will be real nice once summer comes. :(

Moose
2008-Apr-18, 02:37 PM
What further complicates matters is that you typically can't completely drain a pool without causing expensive damage to the pool liner.

Even if you did drain it, the very first rain would reestablish the problem. The better solution is for whoever is managing the foreclosed home to have someone go by weekly and keep the pools at the correct chlorine levels. That's all it really takes.


Quick question, how quickly could mosquitoes form a resistance to the pesticides they're using? It it something we have to seriously consider in the short term? Short as in the next couple of years?

Hard to say, really. I suspect it'll depend on how many breeding mosquitoes come in contact with the pesticide and survive the experience. Mosquito generations are short and frequent, and that's always been a good predictor for quickness of adaptation.

I don't know if 'a couple of years' will be quite enough, but I suspect 'decades' would be the right order of magnitude for a guesstimate.

Kaptain K
2008-Apr-18, 02:51 PM
Just another reason to live in (or near) Austin, Tx. :dance: With up to 2 million hungry bats living under the Congress Avenue bridge, mosquitoes are never a problem! :clap:

NEOWatcher
2008-Apr-21, 12:34 PM
Sounds like common sense to me...
Yes; as I said...we know the issue.
My question though...What portion of the mosquito population can be attributed to the abandon pools? Or; put another way, just how much higher is the risk?

And the OP article discusses inspection issues not risk. So what if they increased thier workload by a specific percent. It says nothing about what that number represents. Can we even speculate that the 1% to 50% translates to a 50fold increase in the number?

Of the half million pools...how many are already mosquito breeders, and how many are abandon?

If they used to spend 1% of thier time on pools, then what other sources are they responding to, and what percent of the threat is that 99%?

Maha Vailo
2008-Apr-22, 07:45 AM
I'm not really worried about it myself - after all, I'm a 32-year-old woman in excellent health. I don't think it'll do me too much harm should I get infected. Heck, considering my vocation, it's a wonder if I didn't get it already in the past.

Still, I'd consider taking control measure if I had to sell/abandon a home with a swimming pool - just for other people's sake.

- Maha Vailo

sarongsong
2008-Apr-22, 08:51 AM
West Nile Virus Disease Map
Cumulative 2008 Data as of 3 am, Apr 08, 2008
National Cumulative Human Disease Cases: 3
[Arizona, Mississippi, and Tennessee]
USGS (http://diseasemaps.usgs.gov/wnv_us_human.html)CDC Fact Sheet (http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/wnv_factsheet.htm)
WNV Surveillance Maps detailing human and animal activity additional years:
1999-2008 (http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/Mapsactivity/surv&control08Maps.htm)

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-22, 04:17 PM
Resurrection exactly one year later...

Must be the news media looking through the "one year ago" stories for ideas.

Pools become mosquito havens in foreclosure (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30344932/)

At least this one has some more details.

But; one discrepancy that I did see was the increase in the number of unattended pools and reports.

Last year; they talked about a rise from 1% to 50% of dealing with it.
Compare that to actual reports from LA County from this year, it looks like a 40% increase in cases.
So; obviously, the story from last year is due to their own decision to increas thier workload, not the increase in threat.

novaderrik
2009-Apr-22, 06:16 PM
no one knows who is responsible for foreclosed homes- some say the city should take care of it. legally, the bank now owns the property, so they should take care of it. if an abandoned house has a pool that is causing a mosquito problem, then the city should go after the bank that now owns the property to take care of it.

geonuc
2009-Apr-23, 11:21 AM
Legally, yes, the bank owns the pool and is responsible. But, echoing Aurora's earlier post, I think it behooves neighbors to act on their own and toss a few anti-mosquito tablets over the fence into the pool.

Click Ticker
2009-Apr-23, 02:39 PM
Maintaining foreclosed properties for a modest fee has actually become quite a nice business opportunity.

Fazor
2009-Apr-23, 02:41 PM
Maintaining foreclosed properties for a modest fee has actually become quite a nice business opportunity.

You know what? I never thought of that. I'd kinda like that job, too.

Click Ticker
2009-Apr-23, 02:52 PM
You know what? I never thought of that. I'd kinda like that job, too.

Wait till you see what disgruntled former homeowers do to the property prior to eviction before you jump in. It's not all vacuum cleaners and windex.

Fazor
2009-Apr-23, 03:11 PM
Wait till you see what disgruntled former homeowers do to the property prior to eviction before you jump in. It's not all vacuum cleaners and windex.

I'm quite aware. Still, it beats sitting behind a desk. And those are just one-time clean up issues, the rest would be routine maintenance.

Plus, it seems like a job you could work on the side. But, as with anything, it'd be real dependent on knowing someone that could hook you up with a bank's property management.