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View Full Version : Rumor Mill Churns With NASA's Upcoming Announcement



Fraser
2008-May-09, 03:40 PM
This past Wednesday, NASA announced they have scheduled a press conference for next Wednesday, May 14, at 1 p.m. EDT, to reveal the discovery of an object in our galaxy that astronomers have been hunting for more than 50 years. This gives everyone an entire week to speculate, ruminate and in some cases go [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/05/09/rumor-mill-churns-with-nasas-upcoming-announcement/)

galacsi
2008-May-09, 07:37 PM
The black hole at the galaxy center ?

KaiYeves
2008-May-09, 08:35 PM
I'm going to guess something with black holes.

djellison
2008-May-09, 08:43 PM
We've already 'observed' the black hole at the galactic centre, via an IR camera taking images over a period of years of stars orbiting it. ( http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/GC/index.php )

I'm going to guess extra-solar Earth like planet.

Kullat Nunu
2008-May-09, 08:51 PM
I'm going to guess extra-solar Earth like planet.

It has something to do with X-ray astronomy, so extrasolar planets are out.

Neutron stars were discovered in the 1960s, black holes belonged to the realm of speculation before high-energy astronomy so they both are probably out of question.

Cataclysmic variables involving white dwarfs? Hot interstellar gas?

GOURDHEAD
2008-May-10, 02:34 AM
Oort cloud parameters?

Maksutov
2008-May-10, 02:48 AM
It's the "Mirror Galaxy"! Every time we wave they wave too.

trinitree88
2008-May-10, 01:29 PM
Jimmy Hoffa? ;) pete

JustAFriend
2008-May-10, 02:56 PM
The fleet has turned toward us and invasion is just a few decades away.

Enjoy your summer!!!

KaiYeves
2008-May-10, 05:56 PM
Jimmy Hoffa?
Good one!

VanderL
2008-May-10, 07:10 PM
Pop III star?


Cheers.

Tuckerfan
2008-May-11, 08:38 AM
It has something to do with X-ray astronomy, so extrasolar planets are out.Not if it was a pathetic little world used as the test subject for the empire's new battle station. ;)

Seriously, though, Dyson Spheres (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyson_sphere) were first thought of almost 50 years ago, and the article does say it was something that they've been trying to find for about that long. What other astonomical theories would have originated at about that time?

KaiYeves
2008-May-11, 11:57 AM
You've now got 29 signatures, Tuckerfan. Nice job!

trinitree88
2008-May-13, 10:07 PM
What other astonomical theories would have originated at about that time?


off hand....SETI has been ~ 50 years, but with x-ray data, I'm thinking maybe a pulsar responsible for the latest burp in the Local Bubble that enables dust-free Ultraviolet imaging of nearby stars. pete

KaiYeves
2008-May-13, 10:43 PM
Well, it's tomorrow, people. Something to look forward to besides that Spanish test.

Kullat Nunu
2008-May-14, 05:10 PM
It is a 140 year old supernova remnant in Milky Way! Cool.

sarongsong
2008-May-14, 05:44 PM
supernova remnant G1.9+0.3 (http://front.math.ucdavis.edu/0804.2317)

Image Gallery (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/multimedia/photos08-062.html)

VanderL
2008-May-14, 07:39 PM
It is a 140 year old supernova remnant in Milky Way! Cool.

Hmmm, hunting the thing for 50 years? Yawn.

Cheers.

P.S. Nice images, though.

KaiYeves
2008-May-14, 08:41 PM
That IS cool!

Acolyte
2008-May-14, 09:11 PM
They pre-booked a press conference for that? Doesn't seem worth the hype unless you're a nova specialist.

So... how did they know 50 years back that it existed at all? Or is it just a general 'we were looking for a close nova' thing?

01101001
2008-May-14, 09:56 PM
They pre-booked a press conference for that? Doesn't seem worth the hype unless you're a nova specialist.

Some knew it likely wouldn't be a big deal for the general population, but significant for people like us interested in space and astronomy science. Non-NASA commentary provided the hyperbolic hype -- though NASA's PR tactics greased the skids, so they get some blame.


So... how did they know 50 years back that it existed at all? Or is it just a general 'we were looking for a close nova' thing?

General. Any single one would have been of interest.

As noted in the other topic (NASA to Announce Success of Long Galactic Hunt (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/73842-nasa-announce-success-long-galactic-hunt.html)):

BA Blog: Youngest galactic supernova (not aliens) found (http://www.badastronomy.com/bablog/2008/05/14/youngest-galactic-supernova-not-aliens-found/)


Anyway, seriously, this is a big deal. Why?
[...]
So there you go. This object will be heavily studied now, I’m sure, because it’s the youngest such explosion we can see up close. It may help us understand how white dwarfs explode, and what the environment is like near the center of the galaxy, and how gas behaves when it violently expands in such a place.

And, well, it’s just cool. It’s been a mystery for a long time why we haven’t seen any young remnants — we expect there to be 60 of them younger than 2000 years, but only 10 are known — and now that we’ve seen this one we know they’re out there, but really just a pain to detect. You can bet that astronomers will look even harder for more of them now that we know they exist.

Jerry
2008-May-15, 02:07 AM
They pre-booked a press conference for that? Doesn't seem worth the hype unless you're a nova specialist.

So... how did they know 50 years back that it existed at all? Or is it just a general 'we were looking for a close nova' thing?

I think it is very important: We should expect our galaxy to be similar to our closest neighbors; and this puts it on the right track. Supernova are (exclusively(?)) responsible for the scatter of all of the heavy elements; so we must expect a local population to make our very existence compatible with our models.

Plus - We have another local ember to dissect.

sarongsong
2008-May-15, 05:19 AM
They pre-booked a press conference for that?...Two noteworthies (though I don't recall the conference mentioning them):
...In the case of G1.9+0.3 the material is expanding outwards at almost 35 million miles per hour, or about 5% the speed of light, an unprecedented expansion speed for a supernova remnant. Another superlative for G1.9+0.3 is that it has generated the most energetic electrons ever seen in a supernova remnant...
Image Gallery (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/multimedia/photos08-062.html)

mfumbesi
2008-May-15, 11:57 AM
The BA has an excellent write up on this. Thanks for the heads-up.