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John Kierein
2002-Mar-15, 11:27 AM
The inhabitants of Jupiter are escaping from their strong gravity by riding a beam of x-rays from the Jupiter North pole. They float up in a storm that looks like a hydrocarbon haze, but contains big bodies, too. They ride this beam using the Compton effect.
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/jupiter_spot_020313.html
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2002/07mar_jupiterpuzzle.htm?friend

They're coming after us because we're gonna crash Galileo into their home planet and they didn't like what happened when Shoemaker-Levy hit 'em.

CJSF
2002-Mar-15, 11:58 AM
Um..... this is "tongue in cheek", right John?

CJSF

ChallegedChimp
2002-Mar-15, 12:15 PM
Methinks John forgot these:

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif
/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif
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Odd what some people will believe. I'll stick to being a dumb monkey and choose not to believe those links.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ChallegedChimp on 2002-03-15 07:16 ]</font>

John Kierein
2002-Mar-15, 02:30 PM
The Jupiterans. They usually have a good sense of humor, in fact they can be quite jovial. But they don't like being hit by Galileo.

odysseus0101
2002-Mar-15, 03:14 PM
Odd what some people will believe. I'll stick to being a dumb monkey and choose not to believe those links.


Although I couldn't access the first link, the second one is science.nasa.gov, an official site as far as I know. The article there doesn't say anything about aliens, although at one point early in the article it does use the term "beacon," probably loosely, as later in the article the phenomenon is attributed to natural (although at present mysterious) events.

John Kierein
2002-Mar-15, 09:47 PM
I had no problem accessing the link that shows a spot on Jupiter near the North pole at the same latitude as the x-ray beacon. This spot is described as being hydrocarbon haze. It was imaged by Cassini during its flyby. It's a UV image and there is animation of it. (The black spot in the center of the picture is just missing data.)It's elliptically shaped like the great red spot that is at lower latitudes.

Jigsaw
2002-Mar-16, 01:45 AM
From the NASA link:

The 45-minute pulsations are very mysterious," adds Elsner. They're not perfectly regular like a signal from E.T. might be; the period drifts back and forth by a few percent.
IMO, "beacon" is an extraordinarily poor word choice for a NASA article, the gist of which is, "we don't know what it is, but it probably ain't Little Green Men."

From Merriam-Webster online:

Main Entry: 1bea·con
Pronunciation: 'bE-k&n
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English beken, from Old English bEacen sign; akin to Old High German bouhhan sign
Date: 14th century
1 : a signal fire commonly on a hill, tower, or pole
2 a : a lighthouse or other signal for guidance b : a radio transmitter emitting signals for guidance of aircraft
3 : a source of light or inspiration
The word "beacon" clearly connotes an artificial signal.

DStahl
2002-Mar-16, 06:28 AM
Oh my gosh! That hydrocarbon haze floats around my neighborhood early in the morning, especially balmy summer mornings when people have their windows open. And its on Jupiter too? NASA really said they've got bacon on Jupiter? Oh my gosh!

--Don Stahl

John Kierein
2002-Mar-16, 11:42 AM
They're bakin' on Jupiter. And at the North Pole to boot! Actually they were bakin', but the first bunch of Jovials have left and the original "haze spot" is gone. But new ones keep popping up. They're boiling mad.

Simon
2002-Mar-16, 06:09 PM
On 2002-03-16 06:42, John Kierein wrote:
They're bakin' on Jupiter. And at the North Pole to boot! Actually they were bakin', but the first bunch of Jovials have left and the original "haze spot" is gone. But new ones keep popping up. They're boiling mad.


Oooh, good one! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

John Kierein
2002-Mar-17, 03:25 PM
Do you think the Jupiterans will be able to deflect Galileo. They WERE able to break up Shoemaker-Levy so it had several smaller collisions.

Simon
2002-Mar-17, 08:49 PM
I thought that was tida... whoops, me and my big mouth. I'm not sure, Galileo is smaller than S-L 9 was, it'll be harder to aim their gravity guns at...
/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

Martian Jim
2002-Mar-23, 07:40 AM
there maybe things comming from jupiter but the real invaders are coming from mars.

i wonder who it could be............