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banquo's_bumble_puppy
2008-May-26, 02:43 PM
Has anyone ever found a meteorite that is older than our solar system? Presumably such a rock would come from outside our system?

antoniseb
2008-May-26, 03:56 PM
Yes, we have found meteorites that have grains older than the solar system.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2008-May-26, 04:13 PM
Any idea how old?

01101001
2008-May-26, 04:20 PM
Any idea how old?

National Geographic: Meteorite's Organic Matter Older Than the Sun, Study Says (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/11/061130-meteorite.html)


Organic globules found in a meteorite that slammed into Canada's Tagish Lake may be older than our sun, a new study says.
[...]
Most of the meteorite's material is about the same age as our solar system—about 4.5 billion years—and was likely formed at the same time[...]

But the microscopic organic globules that make up about one-tenth of one percent of the object appear to be far older.

It may depend on when you date the start of our solar system. That old stuff probably came from the same matter that became our solar system. Wikipedia: Tagish Lake meteorite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tagish_Lake_meteorite):


Analyses have shown that they are of a primitive age, containing unchanged stellar dust granules that may have been part of the cloud of material that created our solar system and Sun.

antoniseb
2008-May-26, 04:40 PM
Any idea how old?

I don't have specific references to articles, but if I recall correctly there are several most common ages for the ancient grains... something like 5.3, 5.9 and 6.5 billion years old. (don't quote these specific numbers, they are close, but subject to a lot years of forgetting on my part).