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View Full Version : can we identify space stones which are lying at the bottom of the sea



suntrack2
2008-Jun-12, 05:35 PM
Infact this is too much difficult task to find out anything like this one, but in my opinion, the 3/4 part of earth is surrounded by water, so any entity in the earth arena may be attract towards sea, there may be least incidents happened or happining in which the asteriods are falling on the land, as compare to land, there is a great possibility that it might be fall in the earth's sea's.

Most of the burning part may be getting immediate cool down when they fall in the sea, in other cases any falling particles on a large scale might be falling impact on the big fish in the sea !, because any falling item in the sea attracts the sea life towards that, either in the form of "when the big fish scattered in 180 degree angle, or some of them may swallowing that stone parts ! :). Because the falling this is food for them (the big fish asumes) !!

is any study undertaken on this issue !!

sarongsong
2008-Jun-13, 08:29 AM
"Great minds..." :)
June 2008
...about a decade ago, a Columbia University geophysicist named Dallas Abbott had a breakthrough idea...because 70 percent of Earth’s surface is water, wouldn’t most space objects hit the sea? So she began searching...What she has found is spine-chilling: evidence that several enormous asteroids or comets have slammed into our planet quite recently, in geologic terms...
The Atlantic Monthly (http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200806/asteroids)

Tedward
2008-Jun-13, 09:57 AM
Looking at the Earth impact data base
http://www.unb.ca/passc/ImpactDatabase/index.html
And knowing the coverage of dirt vs water I thought it was obvious. Silverpit off the UK for example, although I understand there is some dispute over its creation. Then how big are the after effects, tidal waves for example?

KLIK
2008-Jun-13, 12:55 PM
Hi Suntrack2,
I've often thought that small meteorites falling into the sea would end up in sedimentary rocks, So whenever I'm in a chalk area I keep a lookout for dark coloured meteorites as they should show up well (not found any yet and need to be aware of stones dropped from trees, dead dinos etc. In Devon we've had so much mining that any ablated rock is probably industrial slag).

A search of sedimentary beds could be illuminating.

(thanks Tedward. I knew there was one in the North Sea, but not the name. and; do you know remember anything about prehistoric meteorite debris found near Bristol 4-8 yr ago?)

JustAFriend
2008-Jun-13, 12:59 PM
Why would you want to find meteorites under the ocean when they can be readily found on land????

(If you get the Travel Channel, "Cash and Treasures" did a whole show on people who go out looking for meteorites to sell...)

Lots cheaper to just go out and dig them up in the fields......

Tedward
2008-Jun-13, 01:59 PM
(thanks Tedward. I knew there was one in the North Sea, but not the name. and; do you know remember anything about prehistoric meteorite debris found near Bristol 4-8 yr ago?)

No, sorry. Just passing interest. Started looking at the 65 million year event, got sidetracked to the 250 million nearly wiped out event and ended up there. Very interesting stuff. More recently, 1607, there was a tsunami (TBC?) up the bristol channel.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Jun-14, 12:39 PM
Have a look at the Bad Astronomy site on misconceptions about meteorites and how hot they are:)

Most of the burning part may be getting immediate cool down when they fall in the sea, in other cases any falling particles on a large scale might be falling impact on the big fish in the sea !, because any falling item in the sea attracts the sea life towards that, either in the form of "when the big fish scattered in 180 degree angle, or some of them may swallowing that stone parts ! :). Because the falling this is food for them (the big fish asumes) !!

is any study undertaken on this issue !!