PDA

View Full Version : Force field quantum limit?



zerocold
2008-Jun-24, 03:27 AM
This question comes from one question on other thread

***********
If the space curvature fall below the plank constant, is still detectable??, or better said, still it have some effect on the space topology?

And the cancellation of the space time curvature (if id that the case) depends only on the source's field? or the accumulated field on that region?

***********
Can someone tell me, if the force fields have their limit due quantum mechanics?, i mean limits on range due the minimun space/energy plank values

thxs

zerocold
2008-Jun-25, 12:54 AM
Silence arround......come one someone would be gentle to explain me that? :)

trinitree88
2008-Jun-25, 03:44 PM
Silence arround......come one someone would be gentle to explain me that? :)

zerocold. Your question is not clear. What space curvature are you talking about?....and the Planck constant relates the energy content of a photon...E ...to it's frequency (v) nu. It does not limit the curvature of space. Perhaps you mean the Planck length? ~ 1.6 x 10-34 meters. pete

see:Wikipedia, Planck length

mugaliens
2008-Jun-25, 07:31 PM
Despite a certain pet theory of mine, the evidence to date indicates that gravity works equally throughout all orders of magnitude, both on planets, and on individual quarks and other elementary particles/wavicles.

zerocold
2008-Jun-28, 07:37 AM
Perhaps you mean the Planck length?

Yes, if the time /space modification is/are lower than the plank constant , there is still a grav. field?

Also what im saying is, for example 2 objects with atractive gravity influence, but both are very very far, so the atraction velocity is under all the dimension/time Plank contant, will they move?

mugaliens
2008-Jun-28, 04:41 PM
Yes, if the time /space modification is/are lower than the plank constant , there is still a grav. field?

zerocold, he asked you, "Perhaps you mean the Planck length?"

You continue to (incorrectly) insist on using the term "constant" when it's not applicable. It's related to the Planck length, but when you're talking dimensions, the correct term is "length," not "constant."

zerocold
2008-Jun-28, 08:13 PM
ok, length/time then..so there is a movement or no?

mugaliens
2008-Jun-29, 09:16 AM
ok, length/time then..so there is a movement or no?

I take it you're referring to the 5th post in this thread.

So far as I know, yes. However, while we can "see" individual electrons, protons, and neutrons, we can't see quarks and other elementary particles, and even those are much larger than Planck length.

Therefore, I believe I'm fairly certain we have yet to devise any way to test this, and probably won't possess enough technology to do so any time in the near future, if at all.

On the other hand, I'm not sure what the mathematics say on the effects of gravity on Planck-sized units of length and time.

Like I said, I have my own pet theory, but haven't the mathematics to describe it one way or the other. I suppose if I did, I might be at the trail heard towards a TOE (theory of everything), embracing both gravity and electronuclear (GUT) force.

The best visual aid I've found to review the various forces and their relationships is given in this graphic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_Everything#Modern_physics). We understand both electric force and magnetic force very well, as we do electromagnetism, it's brother, the Weak force, and their parent, the Electroweak force.

Because of the binding energies which hold quarks and gluons together, we don't understand the Strong force nearly as well, nor it's parent (Electronuclear force), shared with it's electroweak sibling.

Naturally, the Holy Grail would be a better understanding of Gravity and it's relationship with the Electronuclear force. And that's the level of the question you're asking. We're just not there, yet.