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View Full Version : Eating more salt can invite blood pressure problem.



suntrack2
2008-Jun-24, 03:30 PM
I am not a doctor, but what I presume that salt in our meal must be limited. As most of the people use more salt in their food items, I think the cause of rising blood pressure is related with this habit. I know without salt the meal do not like tasty, but the use must be very restricted otherwise the rise in the blood pressure result into uneasyness. Even sometime the more sweating is also the primary cause of using more salts. But I heard that the pure sea salt may be helpful for health. !!

I want your feedback or experience upon this one.

lack of salt may also creat health problems. :)

samkent
2008-Jun-24, 03:37 PM
I think the rise is due to artery clogging. You need a certain volume of blood flow. If your pipes are reduced in diameter the pressure has to go up to get the same flow.

Whirlpool
2008-Jun-24, 03:39 PM
I'm Diabetic , and my doctor suggested to eat Potassium Salt instead of the Regular Sea Salt. Salt contains Sodiium, if a person has a high Sodium content on the body , it will help increase blood pressure.

High Sodium Intake can increase Blood Pressure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertension)

Jay200MPH
2008-Jun-24, 03:59 PM
In honour of this thread I just put extra salt on my crisps.

I really have nothing to contribute here.

- J

geonuc
2008-Jun-24, 04:13 PM
That there is a connection between sodium intake and high blood pressure has been known for a long time.

crosscountry
2008-Jun-24, 04:39 PM
Sea Salt has less sodium than regular table salt (less iodine too) and I've heard that it is generally healthier for you.


Suntrack, you are correct in saying that no salt is a bad thing. Electrolyte imbalance can lead to sever heart problem not to mention many others at the cellular level.


I eat more salt than I probably should, but it tastes good! :D maybe I'll cut back on my intake and see how my blood pressure reacts. I haven't measured it in years.

dhd40
2008-Jun-24, 05:59 PM
Sea Salt has less sodium than regular table salt (less iodine too) (snip)



Na(NaCl sea salt) < Na(NaCl table salt) ???
Do you really mean this or do I misunderstand you?

sabianq
2008-Jun-24, 06:10 PM
hey,
Ironically i just came from my heart doctor and we had this discussion about salt. apparently salt is essential to a good functioning brain and heart. However, to much salt will cause all sorts of issues to the heart.

he told me to cut down on my salt intake without even asking me about my diet. I questioned this and he stated that most people who eat food are getting way to much salt. if you eat at fast food restruants like Md's or W, your diet can have as much as 2~3 hunderd times the amount of salt required for your body to stay healthy.

if you avoid those places, and only eat out at good restruants, then it is not abnormal to have an intake of 100 ~ 200 times the intake of salt that is considered good.

Apparently eating at home with meals you cook and not using any table salt will give you the right amount.

of course he showed me no data to back up his assertions but the fact that he made it through Med school and is an accomplished heart surgeon give him some credibility in my eyes.

Cheers

crosscountry
2008-Jun-24, 06:18 PM
Na(NaCl sea salt) < Na(NaCl table salt) ???
Do you really mean this or do I misunderstand you?


sea salt has a different mineral content than pure NaCl.


from Wikipedia
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cd/Sea_salt-e_hg.png

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-24, 06:19 PM
Na(NaCl sea salt) < Na(NaCl table salt) ???
Do you really mean this or do I misunderstand you?
I think he's right, but I don't think it's significantly different.

Sea salt has more "other" minerals and is not as high of a concentration of NaCl. (I'm sure there's potassium chloride among other salts).

The iodine piece of it though is man-made. Long ago people didn't get enough iodine in their diets (thyroid issues), so the government encouraged salt manufacturers to "iodize" their product.

Edit:
I see crosscountry posted while I was composing.

One issue left that I don't quite see yet.
How Pure is table salt? Isn't it mined from salt that was once ocean anyway?

sabianq
2008-Jun-24, 06:22 PM
Sea Salt has less sodium than regular table salt (less iodine too) and I've heard that it is generally healthier for you.

.

LOL
Ok before you get hazed, you must understand that sea salt is the same as table salt.

but if you look at the structure of sea salt vs table salt, you can actually say that by mass, un-refined sea salt has less sodium than refined table salt. (mind you your body cannot actually detect a difference.)

but here is why.
unrefined sea salt also has elements such as calcium, potassium, magnesium, sulfate, and traces of others (including heavy metals such as mercury, lead, and cadmium, as well as strontium).

while refined table salt only has salt and iodine (the iodine is added)

if i have one gram of sea salt, i have one gram of salt and other elements

where as one gram of table salt has more salt in it because there are not the other trace elements.

but the difference is literally in the picograms.

my father in law is a renowned chemist and suggests that unrefined salt can be poisonous because of the trace elements.

Nick Theodorakis
2008-Jun-24, 06:23 PM
sea salt has a different mineral content than pure NaCl.


from Wikipedia
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cd/Sea_salt-e_hg.png

So slightly less sodium than NaCl (about 39%), then.

Nick

crosscountry
2008-Jun-24, 06:49 PM
LOL
Ok before you get hazed, you must understand that sea salt is the same as table salt.

but if you look at the structure of sea salt vs table salt, you can actually say that by mass, un-refined sea salt has less sodium than refined table salt. (mind you your body cannot actually detect a difference.)

but here is why.
unrefined sea salt also has elements such as calcium, potassium, magnesium, sulfate, and traces of others (including heavy metals such as mercury, lead, and cadmium, as well as strontium).

while refined table salt only has salt and iodine (the iodine is added)

if i have one gram of sea salt, i have one gram of salt and other elements

where as one gram of table salt has more salt in it because there are not the other trace elements.

but the difference is literally in the picograms.

my father in law is a renowned chemist and suggests that unrefined salt can be poisonous because of the trace elements.

picograms is probably well understated. I imagine if that chart is correct approximately 85% of seasalt is normal NaCL where the rest, 15% are other types of salts and some trace elements that maybe we don't want. (of course I realize each element weighs a different amount)


fortunately all the animals in the ocean haven't died yet, so maybe we can still eat the salt from evaporated sea water.

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-24, 07:01 PM
...fortunately all the animals in the ocean haven't died yet, so maybe we can still eat the salt from evaporated sea water.
But they've evolved to a life under the sea... we haven't.

sabianq
2008-Jun-24, 07:10 PM
But they've evolved to a life under the sea... we haven't.

like sponge bob?

crosscountry
2008-Jun-24, 07:29 PM
But they've evolved to a life under the sea... we haven't.



we can help our own evolution by eating sea salt:whistle:

dhd40
2008-Jun-25, 10:40 AM
sea salt has a different mineral content than pure NaCl.


from Wikipedia
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cd/Sea_salt-e_hg.png

ok, I was thinking only of the pure chemical NaCl. I now understand from your comment above and from sabianq´s post that the difference between sea salt and table salt is unrefined vs refined

Click Ticker
2008-Jun-25, 12:40 PM
We rarely have any table salt or any other salt at the house. When recipes call for it, we leave it out. The reason too much salt is bad for you is because it causes the body to retain water. Water retention is a contributing factor to high blood pressure.


Sodium is an environmental factor that has received the greatest attention. Approximately one third of the essential hypertensive population is responsive to sodium intake[7]. This is due to the fact that increasing amounts of salt in a person's bloodstream causes cells to release water (due to osmotic pressure) to equilibrate concentration gradient of salt between the cells and the bloodstream; increasing the pressure on the blood vessel walls.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertension

Okay, it doesn't specifically say "water retention", but it's close.

Tedward
2008-Jun-25, 12:46 PM
I cook most of my meals. I then control the salt, not out of a packet meal controlling it. I read the food labels avidly and it is very surprising what salt is in the morning cereal for example let alone the microwave dinner.

Jens
2008-Jun-25, 01:46 PM
fortunately all the animals in the ocean haven't died yet.

But many of them have. You'd be surprised at how many ocean organisms die each year. Maybe they should be avoiding the salt. Or maybe they should be avoiding the SHARKS!

crosscountry
2008-Jun-25, 03:15 PM
ok, I was thinking only of the pure chemical NaCl. I now understand from your comment above and from sabianq´s post that the difference between sea salt and table salt is unrefined vs refined

it's not a matter of refined or unrefined. Sea salt contains other minerals. Sure, you could take those out and have NaCl, but then you're eating more sodium.

I'm not positive, but I think most table salt comes from other sources.

geonuc
2008-Jun-25, 05:05 PM
I'm not positive, but I think most table salt comes from other sources.
A lot of it comes from evaporation of saline water, including seawater. Some comes from crushed rock salt (halite).

This outfit has some information on the industry:

http://www.saltinstitute.org/

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-25, 05:10 PM
it's not a matter of refined or unrefined.
Sure it is. Rock salt IS old sea salt.

Sea salt contains other minerals.
So does rock salt. We have LOTS of salt mines here. Much or the salt goes directly from the mine to the icy roadways. You should see what that even looks like.


I'm not positive, but I think most table salt comes from other sources.
That part is true. Most table salt is mined. But; that probably wasn't true before the Great Lakes salt deposits were exploited (not that it really applies to this conversation...just worth noting)

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-25, 05:17 PM
A lot of it comes from evaporation of saline water, including seawater. Some comes from crushed rock salt (halite).
According to their page, I'd like to expand on your statement and point out that the saline water (brine) is not necessarily seawater, and most of it is from rock deposits.
In other words it's still from rock salt, but it's not a direct crushing of mined material.

Solar evaporation is just another method of refining no matter what the source is.

crosscountry
2008-Jun-25, 05:28 PM
Sure it is. Rock salt IS old sea salt.

So does rock salt. We have LOTS of salt mines here. Much or the salt goes directly from the mine to the icy roadways. You should see what that even looks like.


That part is true. Most table salt is mined. But; that probably wasn't true before the Great Lakes salt deposits were exploited (not that it really applies to this conversation...just worth noting)



I don't eat the salt the put on roads, but you can do if if you like:lol:

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-25, 05:32 PM
I don't eat the salt the put on roads, but you can do if if you like:lol:
After refining I would... In fact you probably do.

crosscountry
2008-Jun-25, 05:43 PM
the topic of this thread is salt we eat ;)

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-25, 05:48 PM
the topic of this thread is salt we eat ;)
Yep; I was just trying to make the point that the refining process is necessary no matter what the source is.

geonuc
2008-Jun-25, 06:06 PM
According to their page, I'd like to expand on your statement and point out that the saline water (brine) is not necessarily seawater, and most of it is from rock deposits.
I believe my phrasing was correct - I said "including seawater".

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-25, 06:12 PM
I believe my phrasing was correct - I said "including seawater".
Absolutely you phrased it correctly, but I can see some people not paying attention to closely.

geonuc
2008-Jun-25, 08:23 PM
Absolutely you phrased it correctly, but I can see some people not paying attention to closely.
Sorry. Misunderstood. :)

crosscountry
2008-Jun-26, 04:27 PM
Yep; I was just trying to make the point that the refining process is necessary no matter what the source is.



seasalt may require no refining at all - and has less sodium than your refined iodized salt.

farmerjumperdon
2008-Jun-26, 06:05 PM
Unless a person is incredibly strict on intake of processed foods, restaurant food, etc; you are certain to be getting more than enough salt without ever touching a salt shaker. The only way you will be deficient in salt is if you make every meal from scratch and add no salt.

I have been off the shaker for about 2 decades now. My only indulgences are with eggs, corn on the cob, and popcorn. I eat enough processed and restaurant food to get all the salt I need.

This was at the recommendation of my doc as a preemptive strike against what used to be called borderline high blood pressure. It has worked.

crosscountry
2008-Jun-26, 08:46 PM
thanks farmerdon. I'm considering a similar diet. It would be hard to give up salt on my eggs!!!!


but adding extra salt to my hamburger is not good, nor is my salt tacos with some meat. I'm only 27, but it makes sense to curtail my intake before it becomes a bad habit and worse a health risk. I'll still buy salted butter though :D