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View Full Version : Milk:The White Gold-What Are You Paying?



Mr. Milton Banana
2008-Jun-28, 02:00 PM
Here in the U.S., in the northeast where I am, the cost of a gallon of milk is anywhere from $4 to $4.50 a gallon. What are you folks paying in your part of the planet?

mahesh
2008-Jun-28, 03:19 PM
we've got a nice cow! she kindly, lets us have it free!

edit: our cow was fawning all over me, that she gets a mention at BAUT! And no, she doesn't know the one that jumped over the Moon!

She said to mention that she is from Guernsey and says mooo(!) to mamma!

tdvance
2008-Jun-28, 03:23 PM
I actually don't know (would never make a good politician)--don't look at the price when I buy it, in contrast to gasoline! Same with bottled water which, in small bottles, is probably a bit more than gasoline. But then, I don't go through 15 gallons of milk/bottled water a week either.

mugaliens
2008-Jun-28, 05:08 PM
Here in the U.S., in the northeast where I am, the cost of a gallon of milk is anywhere from $4 to $4.50 a gallon. What are you folks paying in your part of the planet?

Nothing. I eat chalk for my calcium.

Seriously, I no longer buy milk. I get more than enough sun for Vit D, and get my calcium via yogurt, cottage cheese, and cheese.

Jay200MPH
2008-Jun-28, 08:16 PM
About €0.65 a litre for the cheaper brands. Which is less than half what I pay for gasoline.

When I lived in Ontario a litre was around $2.25 :eek: - although it was cheaper if you bought it in larger quantities.

- J

Torsten
2008-Jun-28, 08:21 PM
Just paid C$4.69 for 4 litres of 2%, which is 84% of the cost of the same volume of regular gasoline here.

Roving Philosopher
2008-Jun-28, 09:10 PM
Well, unless it's shot way up in the last week, here in Minnesota, a gallon of milk costs about $2.90 at Sam's. On top of that, every few weeks, our grocery store usually has a sale - 2 gallons for $5.

As we have a three year old son, we tend to go through a lot of milk.

sarongsong
2008-Jun-29, 01:24 AM
...in Minnesota, a gallon of milk costs about $2.90...every few weeks...a sale - 2 gallons for $5...Ah, but you probably have to buy both at once to get the savings, at least that's how it works here in California, much to my consternation. (Congratulations on your prices, tho---sounds like yours is among the most inexpensive in the U.S.)
Right now, one of the local leading market chains is offering a sale on their own branded milk:
BUY 2 GALLONS PAY ONLY 2/$5.79
3.99 for the 1st item
1.80 for the 2nd item
YOU SAVE $1.09 [???]You cannot buy only 1 gallon and divide $5.79 by 2.
Non-sale competing brands are $5.49/gal. and $6.99 for "organic", at this same store. Whenever these brands go on sale, the same "must-buy-two" rule goes into effect. What about those who cannot consume that much milk at one buying.

Musashi
2008-Jun-29, 02:10 AM
Drink faster :)

Jens
2008-Jun-29, 03:00 AM
Sorry to leave the conversion to you, but in Tokyo it's usually about 200 yen for a liter.

Doodler
2008-Jun-29, 12:09 PM
$1.93 for a half gallon of 2% milk. 1% is about $1.87. Skim is $1.80. Whole milk pushing $2.00

Interesting, eh?

BigDon
2008-Jun-29, 02:15 PM
I'm doing the almost $5 a gallon too. I'll cruise through a gallon of milk in a day and a half by myself.

Argos
2008-Jun-29, 02:36 PM
In this part of the earth, the average whole UHT milk costs R$ 2.00 [US$ 1.20] a litre --> US$ 4.50 a gallon.

mike alexander
2008-Jun-29, 02:46 PM
I'll cruise through a gallon of **** in a day and a half by myself

Heartbreaker.

mugaliens
2008-Jun-29, 08:05 PM
$1.93 for a half gallon of 2% milk. 1% is about $1.87. Skim is $1.80. Whole milk pushing $2.00

Interesting, eh?

I'll say, as it takes more processing to rid itself of the fat! However, that fat isn't just thrown away, but is used in other products, which may account for the price differential.

Personally I believe it's simply because most people don't like drinking skim milk...

mugaliens
2008-Jun-29, 08:08 PM
Heartbreaker.

That's one each month (lunar month).

Occam
2008-Jun-29, 08:13 PM
The average price here is $3.02 per 2 litres - approximately $6.80 a gallon.
A kilo block of cheese can cost $15.00.

tdvance
2008-Jun-29, 10:20 PM
Ok--two gas stations in Edgewater, MD (Exxon and BP) across the street from each other, are selling milk for $3.15 per gallon and advertising it with big signs.

sarongsong
2008-Jun-29, 10:26 PM
...gas stations...are selling milk..."Two---two cartels in one!" :doh:

Tobin Dax
2008-Jun-30, 03:23 AM
"Two---two cartels in one!" :doh:
I saw that a lot when I was living in Illinois. Even for convenience stores (or gas stations), milk is one of those staple items that you can use to draw in customers.

Ivan Viehoff
2008-Jun-30, 10:16 AM
The average price here is $3.02 per 2 litres - approximately $6.80 a gallon.
Actually that calculation is for an Imperial (UK) gallon (160 fl oz) - 4.5 litres. I expect OP had in mind a US gallon (128 fl oz) - 3.8 litres.

mfumbesi
2008-Jun-30, 10:17 AM
I pay about a $1 per liter.
It is interesting that in the US you also think Milk is controlled by a cartel, locally it is always muted in the media. There is a tribunal looking to the price fixing.


Milk producers have blamed retailers for the high price of milk - and have told the Competition Tribunal that they formed "mutually beneficial relations" with each other to prevent milk from being "poured down the drain"......

This gems is from this link http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&click_id=594&art_id=vn20080206061224516C509325

Then the tribunal itself will be in September.

The Competition Commission says that the Competition Tribunal has set a date for the hearing in the cartel case against eight dairy processors, investigated for alleged price fixing of milk products. The hearing will start in September this year.......
From this link http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article.php?a_id=126848

Click Ticker
2008-Jun-30, 12:12 PM
We've got two main grocery stores near us. Every other week one of them has it on sale for either $2.50 or $2.77 a gallon. This month is "Dairy Month" at one of them, so it's been on sale a lot.

I tried dumping a bunch in my gas tank but that didn't work out so well.

Laguna
2008-Jun-30, 12:45 PM
On discount I would pay
0.68€ct per liter for 3.8% fat 2.57€/gallon -> 4.07US$/gallon
0.61€ct per liter for 1.5% fat 2.31€/gallon -> 3.65US$/gallon

But as I buy "organic" milk and get it delivered directly to my door I pay
1.10€ per liter for 3.8% fat 4.16€/gallon ->6.58US$/gallon
1.05€ per liter for 1.5% fat 3.97/gallon -> 6.27US$/gallon

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-30, 01:03 PM
I'll say, as it takes more processing to rid itself of the fat! However, that fat isn't just thrown away, but is used in other products, which may account for the price differential.

It might be the other way around. Does anybody know where to get the numbers for what I'm about to say...I'd love to know if I'm close.

But; judging by the price of cheese, and the price of milk, and the shelf life of each, it would seem to me that the cheese is the higher demand product.

I don't know how many dairys work this way, but from what I have seen it works this way:
The fats are extracted from the milk, and what remains is skim. They add some of the fat back in depending on the level of demand for each type of milk.
They would love to sell skim only, leaving more for cheese and butter.

Personally I believe it's simply because most people don't like drinking skim milk...[/quote]

Laguna
2008-Jun-30, 01:37 PM
I don't know if all diaries do it alike but I visited one last week and they remove the fat depending of the needed fat content for their cheese.
They do not remove all and then put back what is needed but remove only the part that is not needed. The not needed part is used to produce butter and cream.

tdvance
2008-Jun-30, 05:54 PM
Most milk you get from a (US) supermarket is actually powdered and reconstituted (cheaper to ship it that way) so the fat does have to be removed and re-added. To get milk that was never powdered, you buy milk labeled "organic". I've found the difference in taste so minuscule as to go with the cheaper variety.

If one could send "dry gas" at a fraction of the weight of ordinary gasoline, and "just add water" to reconstitute it, gas would be cheaper. But of course, that can't happen. Everybody knows if you try to boil gas dry it will ignite :)

Click Ticker
2008-Jun-30, 06:02 PM
Most milk you get from a (US) supermarket is actually powdered and reconstituted (cheaper to ship it that way) so the fat does have to be removed and re-added. To get milk that was never powdered, you buy milk labeled "organic". I've found the difference in taste so minuscule as to go with the cheaper variety.

If one could send "dry gas" at a fraction of the weight of ordinary gasoline, and "just add water" to reconstitute it, gas would be cheaper. But of course, that can't happen. Everybody knows if you try to boil gas dry it will ignite :)

I've never heard that. The organic lable is reserved for how the cows are raised and what they are fed, not powdered milk. The powdered milk is in a box on the shelf separate from the fresh milk.

mugaliens
2008-Jun-30, 06:06 PM
I get more than enough sun for Vit D, and get my calcium via yogurt, cottage cheese, and cheese.

(sigh...)

I just learned today that if I'm ever to get off my hypertension med, I need to avoid red meat, dairy fat in all forms (butter, cheese, cottage cheese, even plain yogurt), drink 1/2% to 1% skim milk for my calcium, exercise even more than I already am, and aside from fish, become a near vegetarian.

I'll still have a dollap of plain yogurt a day, low fat, if I can find it, and the occasional helping of cottage cheese, but half-sized, and with fresh fruit.

I've always thought of myself as being healthy, but my body is convincing me that I wasn't as healthy as I thought I was.

Mugs wants a double-bacon cheeseburger! Waaaahhh!!!

tdvance
2008-Jun-30, 06:23 PM
Well, I got it on good authority from this guy at this bull session. And he's an expert! (in Chemistry, anyway).

So, maybe not. But I wonder where this person got it, since he's usually reliable, at least with Chemistry, Catholicism, and cuantum computing (ok, tried to make it alliterative).

Click Ticker
2008-Jun-30, 06:44 PM
Well, I got it on good authority from this guy at this bull session. And he's an expert! (in Chemistry, anyway).

So, maybe not. But I wonder where this person got it, since he's usually reliable, at least with Chemistry, Catholicism, and cuantum computing (ok, tried to make it alliterative).

I used to help unload it from the truck at the store - so it I know first hand it didn't arrive at the store where I worked in powdered form. I'm inclined to think that the minimal savings in shipping cost would be far more than offset by the expense of dehydrating the milk, packaging for shipment, rehydrating, and repackaging.

Doodler
2008-Jun-30, 08:14 PM
"Two---two cartels in one!" :doh:

The profit margin on fuel is razor thin for gas stations, so they sell groceries to make up for it. They also overcharge for those groceries too, based on their being called "convenience" stores, since the profit line on the grocery store price for food is about 1% or so.

Tobin Dax
2008-Jun-30, 08:46 PM
Well, I got it on good authority from this guy at this bull session. And he's an expert! (in Chemistry, anyway).

So, maybe not. But I wonder where this person got it, since he's usually reliable, at least with Chemistry, Catholicism, and cuantum computing (ok, tried to make it alliterative).

I doubt he's an expert here. I'm really sure that the milk we were bottling when I worked at a dairy one summer was pretty much straight from the cows. It would have been awful expensive to process it twice before bottling. None of the labels called it organic, either. Additionally, the whole milk wasn't processed as much as everything else was, meaning that the fat was actively being removed, not put in.

tdvance
2008-Jul-01, 01:04 AM
I can't confirm what he said on the internet so I'll ask him next time I see him where he got the info.

Kaptain K
2008-Jul-01, 01:26 AM
Speaking of cartels, I don't know if it's still true, but several years ago the price of milk, in the US, was determined by your distance from Wisconsin, even if it was from local cows!
From the price spreads I've seen here, it may still be true!

Tobin Dax
2008-Jul-01, 04:36 AM
Speaking of cartels, I don't know if it's still true, but several years ago the price of milk, in the US, was determined by your distance from Wisconsin, even if it was from local cows!
From the price spreads I've seen here, it may still be true!
I've realized that I miss home. The local IGA chain has a deal with a local dairy that they can sell their milk for whatever they want. I think I saw milk on sale at 99 cents for a gallon once while I was home last Christmas.

Even though I've never lived on my own there, I miss it every time I buy a gallon of milk.

Tobin Dax
2008-Jul-01, 04:40 AM
Okay, time for a hijack. My last post got me thinking about cheese. (Tillamook is so much better than anything I've had living south of Wisconsin.) I'm irked that I can't find a block of cheese that's square in cross-section and actually fits across a slice of bread? Anymore, I can only find cheese that's half that size. I don't want to have half the cheese in my sandwich fall out.

BigDon
2008-Jul-01, 06:32 AM
Ha Ha, I can get big square loafs of tillamook three feet long and you can't!

sarongsong
2008-Jul-01, 08:04 AM
...I can't find a block of cheese that's square in cross-section and actually fits across a slice of bread...Mail-order? (http://madeinoregon.com/detail.aspx?ID=73)

mahesh
2008-Jul-01, 08:57 AM
So, maybe not. But I wonder where this person got it, since he's usually reliable, at least with Chemistry, Catholicism, and cuantum computing (ok, tried to make it alliterative).Ogden Nash smiling at you, Todd.

I realise this is about milk... but seems apposite........

I heard a funny news item on the Today programme this morning:
The police in Holly Springs are imposing surcharges on delinquents caught for traffic violations. The surcharge on top of the statutory fine, is due to the increased costs of fuel used in chasing them down! :D

Back-office accounting could no doubt come up with more reasons:

higher consumption of ---
coffee/tea, using milk/cream while keeping vigil
cheese sandwichesetc etc

NEOWatcher
2008-Jul-01, 04:54 PM
How would you like to save $1.15 per gallon if it meant you had to learn how to pour milk all over again?

New Milk Carton Saves Money (http://www.myfoxcleveland.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=6882186&version=4&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=VSTY&pageId=3.6.1)

Yes; one store here is actually giving milk pouring lessons.

Apparently; it's a big controversy because it's harder to pour. I submit that it is just as easy to pour, and that everyone is just accustomed to the old way. After all; didn't we all have problems pouring milk as we grew up and learned how to do it?
Even in the story, someone says it just takes a few times.

Yep; people love to cry over spilled milk.

Edit: Now that I think about it, don't some dairies supply milk in those "bag-in-a-box" containers where you can pull the spout out? I would think that would be easier and cheaper all around.

Click Ticker
2008-Jul-01, 05:22 PM
We had a local convenience chain that sold the cheapest milk around. They sold it in bags. You would buy a pitcher from the store and buy 1/2 gallon bags of milk. Put the milk in the pitcher and cut the corner off. The open corner would slide down into a slot in the pitcher to seal the milk off. Very inexpensive packaging.

Extravoice
2008-Jul-01, 06:11 PM
I live in New Jersey, but work in Pennsylvania. For some reason milk costs nearly a dollar less per gallon in PA than NJ, so I sneak it home across the border under cover of darkness. BTW: $3.59 in eastern PA.

Gasoline is another story. It is cheaper in NJ...and they pump it for you.

Tobin Dax
2008-Jul-01, 06:20 PM
Mail-order? (http://madeinoregon.com/detail.aspx?ID=73)

Yeah, I know about that. Just haven't done it yet. It looks like it could be about the same price, though.

And Don, I don't like you anymore. :mad:

mugaliens
2008-Jul-01, 08:51 PM
I used to help unload it from the truck at the store - so it I know first hand it didn't arrive at the store where I worked in powdered form. I'm inclined to think that the minimal savings in shipping cost would be far more than offset by the expense of dehydrating the milk, packaging for shipment, rehydrating, and repackaging.

That and the lost future sales because they were trying to sell nasty-tasting de/rehydrated powdered milk...

Seriously, though. In college I dated a girl who was raised on powdered milk because fresh milk was much more expensive. Transportation is a large part of the cost of milk, and transporting powdered milk saves considerably more money than the cost of dehydrating the milk in the first place.

Trebuchet
2008-Jul-01, 11:18 PM
The mess halls when I was in the service in South Korea in the early 1970's served reconstituted milk. The army had a central plant where they processed it and shipped it around the country. I couldn't tell the difference. When I heard it was reconstituted, I figure perhaps it would be better for me due to the change from animal fat to vegetable. But they used coconut oil, which I understand is pretty bad for your cholesterol.

I don't think any of the milk at the supermarket is reconstituted. They'd have to label it as such.

BigDon
2008-Jul-06, 02:58 AM
Yeah, I know about that. Just haven't done it yet. It looks like it could be about the same price, though.

And Don, I don't like you anymore. :mad:

Okay......I'm sorry.....

and this sandwich is good btw.

Bought a short loaf with you in mind. You reminded me of my advantages. Sandwich cut extra sourdough bread with 1/4 inch slab of tillimook, Miracle Whip, and pepper.

Mmmmmm.

Tobin Dax
2008-Jul-06, 04:33 AM
Okay......I'm sorry.....

and this sandwich is good btw.

Bought a short loaf with you in mind. You reminded me of my advantages. Sandwich cut extra sourdough bread with 1/4 inch slab of tillimook, Miracle Whip, and pepper.

Mmmmmm.

I hope you picked up that I wasn't serious, Don. That sandwich sounds good though. I've really got to stop buying the cheap lunch meat, since I don't think it agrees with me.

BigDon
2008-Jul-06, 08:15 AM
I hope you picked up that I wasn't serious, Don. That sandwich sounds good though. I've really got to stop buying the cheap lunch meat, since I don't think it agrees with me.

Well I was *hoping* you weren't serious.

I have lost potential friends doing that though.

suntrack2
2008-Jul-07, 11:48 AM
we don't relent upon the cost of milk, but we look forward about the quality of the milk, many milkmades here use water into milk just to provide milk to the large number of house, our milkman comes in the morning at 8 o' clock nearly and provide in our pot 1litre by counting with his litre barrel and drop it in the pot, later we immediately warm the milk upto an extent and later we keep it in the refridgerator, when we observe the creme gather on the milk with a thick in depth then it means the quality of the milk is great, and no creme gather in the milk that means eighter it it less qualitative or having creme extracted already.

As far as the per liter price is concern in my area, that is say less than a 1$. :)

we buy the milk on the month basis, means we pay to the milkman at the end of the month. every day looking reading on the lactometer is not possible for us to test the degree of the milk, since we have a faith on the milkman. :)

sunil (thanks good topic)

RalofTyr
2008-Jul-09, 01:03 AM
I have pancakes or toast in the morning. I rarely drink milk. Most of the time, I have to throw it out. It was $2.19 a half-gallon at Fresh and Easy last night.