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Empyre
2008-Jun-30, 04:38 PM
The name of the star we orbit is Sol, so its stellar system is called the Solar system. There are no other solar systems because there are no other stars named Sol.

Because the Kelvin temperature scale is an absolute scale, the units are not degrees Kelvin, but simply Kelvins.

tdvance
2008-Jun-30, 05:49 PM
even astronomers call other solar systems "other solar systems" so I can't say that's an error! That our sun is called "Sol" has nothing to do with it. (is that the official IAU name for the sun anyway? Or do only SF writers use that).

plc222
2008-Jul-04, 04:33 PM
I just posted this somewjhere else then saw this thread heheh

Since we are being critics ...
I noticed Dr. Gay mispronounces temperature in the common way..
It is often pronounced as: Temp-a-chur
when it should be as: Temp-er-a-chur

I always thought that was a bad mistake for a weatherperson, but now i include astronomers/physicists because they use the word so much!
Well, maybe it really is best to skip the "er"?
I think of all the time that would have been wasted .. as the meaning is clear enough ~~~

Another funny thing is that Pamela so frequently begins statements with "So.."
I thought it was her unique way , being a teacher, to lead people down the path of a topic... then i noticed a guy they interviewed did it too! ( i think at the AAAS?)
Pamela sometimes confirms Frasier's summaries with an "exactly" but more often does not acknowledge that he spoke - she just expands or clarifies-
It was strange to me at first, but it does cut out a lot of "yeah"s
Well,the English language is not science, but it can be really nerdy too!

Drunk Vegan
2008-Jul-04, 06:17 PM
even astronomers call other solar systems "other solar systems" so I can't say that's an error! That our sun is called "Sol" has nothing to do with it. (is that the official IAU name for the sun anyway? Or do only SF writers use that).

Agreed. I mean, what should we call them, "star systems?" That sounds a little too "Sci-fi circa 1965" for my tastes.

tdvance
2008-Jul-04, 10:47 PM
To me, a star system or stellar system is 2 or more stars gravitationally bound. E.g. Castor with its six suns (a pair of binaries in orbit about a common center and a third binary orbiting the pair).

StarStryder
2008-Jul-04, 11:59 PM
As a Bostonian, I reserve the right to send the letter r in words like Park and apparently Temperature to Maine, where they can help people have "Idears."

:lol:

Empyre
2008-Jul-05, 10:06 AM
To me, a star system or stellar system is 2 or more stars gravitationally bound. E.g. Castor with its six suns (a pair of binaries in orbit about a common center and a third binary orbiting the pair).

A stellar system would be the equivalent to the solar system, with a non-specific star, while a star system would be as you described, a system of stars. You could also be specific to the star, like the Sirian system would the system of Sirius, if it has one. I don't know for sure if that fits the official definition of stellar system and star system, but it is at least non-ambiguous, as long as we agree on the meanings of those phrases. If somebody points me to the official definitions of those terms, I will of course agree to use them correctly.


LOL @ what Pamela said, but I remember that Massachusetts used to claim Maine as part of the same state, well over a century ago.

tdvance
2008-Jul-05, 03:59 PM
Well, if not the official definition, then whose? One can't unilaterally define terms for all of society! There has to be some kind of consensus--whether through IAU or a widely-published dictionary or at least an author well-read and respected enough that people will accept their choice of words as definitive.

The definitions I presented--I actually don't know if I made them up or not--but I think they came from textbooks and/or other people at least.

Empyre
2008-Jul-06, 03:28 AM
The definitions I used seem to make sense, and when things seem to make sense to me, they often turn out to actually be that way, at least in the macroscopic, non-relativistic realm of everyday experience. However, like I said...
If somebody points me to the official definitions of those terms, I will of course agree to use them correctly.

KiwiPhil
2008-Jul-06, 09:07 PM
Wikipedia says
"A star system or stellar system is a small number of stars which orbit each other, bound by gravitational attraction. A large number of stars bound by gravitation is generally called a star cluster or galaxy, although, broadly speaking, they are also star systems. Star system is occasionally also used to refer to a system of a single star together with a planetary system of orbiting smaller bodies"

dcl
2008-Jul-11, 02:05 AM
How about "planetary system"?

clint
2008-Jul-11, 09:13 AM
How about "planetary system"?

How would you distinguish that from a system like, say, Jupiter and its moons?

tdvance
2008-Jul-11, 06:01 PM
Planetary system, by a strange coincidence, is the term I came up with (as in, thought of, not as in, invented) this morning. I also thought, "Jupiter and its moons" but Planetary System seems to fit Solar System better. And I think it's been used in that context too.

undidly
2008-Jul-13, 11:00 PM
I say standardize the meanings or put up with mistakes or misunderstandings .

What date is 12/12 2007 in words?.Depends.US or UK.

How many is a billion in words?. Depends.US or UK.

Imperial or metric measurements?.A Mars lander was lost by mixing the systems at
the design stage.

markk
2008-Jul-14, 07:45 PM
Seems odd that the term "solar system" can mean any star and it's associated objects, however the term "solar mass" (eg. Rigel is a 17 solar mass supergiant) specifically relates to the mass of Sol. For consistency, any term using the root sol- really ought to refer to our own star. Of course, common usage trumps consistency any day of the week (people will still say "the planet Pluto") so this is probably tilting at windmills anyway.

/$.02

WazzuNYC
2008-Jul-15, 03:31 AM
Pamela sometimes confirms Frasier's summaries with an "exactly" but more often does not acknowledge that he spoke - she just expands or clarifies-
It was strange to me at first, but it does cut out a lot of "yeah"s
Well,the English language is not science, but it can be really nerdy too!

I noticed this too, but the non-acknowledgement I think is a result of how they edit the show. Probably saves time just to cut right to the explanation.

Empyre
2008-Jul-15, 04:53 PM
I didn't mean to come across like I was trying to pick apart everything they say in the podcast. I truly do enjoy this podcast immensely.

In light of this conversation, I will refuse to allow the phrase "other solar system" to bother me any more, but I still contend that "degrees Kelvin" is incorrect.

tdvance
2008-Jul-15, 05:25 PM
Seems odd that the term "solar system" can mean any star and it's associated objects, however the term "solar mass" (eg. Rigel is a 17 solar mass supergiant) specifically relates to the mass of Sol. For consistency, any term using the root sol- really ought to refer to our own star. Of course, common usage trumps consistency any day of the week (people will still say "the planet Pluto") so this is probably tilting at windmills anyway.

/$.02

Consistency is often an laudable goal but an impossible one in the English language (even if someone "reformed" it to make it 100% consistent, it's not a static language so it would change again and lose the consistency immediately). Even the language of mathematics has some funny inconsistencies in terminology caused by different mathematicians choosing terms for various concepts. E.g. the rational numbers are dense in the real numbers. But the rational numbers are also nowhere dense in the real numbers--because nowhere dense and dense are not defined in such a way as to be mutually exclusive. Also, every irreducible module is completely reducible. And there are plenty more examples.

Drunk Vegan
2008-Jul-17, 07:34 AM
Seems odd that the term "solar system" can mean any star and it's associated objects, however the term "solar mass" (eg. Rigel is a 17 solar mass supergiant) specifically relates to the mass of Sol. For consistency, any term using the root sol- really ought to refer to our own star. Of course, common usage trumps consistency any day of the week (people will still say "the planet Pluto") so this is probably tilting at windmills anyway.

/$.02

Actually "The planet Pluto" is still correct, simply a truncated version of the correct term "dwarf planet."

jakcuz21
2008-Aug-21, 09:30 PM
sol is the spainish word for the sun which leads me to believe it is (or something close to) the latin word for sun (or star) therefore i think we should call other "star systems" solar systems

plc222
2008-Aug-21, 09:56 PM
I didn't mean to come across like I was trying to pick apart everything they say in the podcast.

but wait .. you are supposed to come across that way in this thread .. :lol:

This forum is great to help clarify the little things that you wonder ... and then accept and forget without knowing WHY

and :



As a Bostonian, I reserve the right to send the letter r in words like Park and apparently Temperature to Maine, where they can help people have "Idears."

:lol: :lol: :lol: that's great

Frogstar
2008-Aug-24, 02:34 PM
The straight dope says that it used to be called Sol until we found out that there are more of them.

http://www.straightdope.com/mailbag/msunname.html

It would appear that it has no name. I don't know who discovered that it is yet unnamed. I vote that we call it Dawn! :lol:

abo999
2008-Sep-03, 11:28 AM
would appear that it has no name. I don't know who discovered that it is yet unnamed. I vote that we call it Dawn! :lol:


I'd prefer it to be called 'Abo's Star' :lol: