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View Full Version : Mt. St. Helen's - After Cycle Updates



dgavin
2008-Jul-11, 04:00 AM
Ok, this might be premature, but going to go ahead and start this off by linking to all the prior BAUT threads about the now quiet volcano.

St. Helen's 2003 -2004 (original) Update thread - Missing in Action

St. Helen's 2004 (Mutant Fly #2 silliness) (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/13732-son-mutant-fly-appears-mt-st-helens) *Link Updated!

St. Helen's 2004 (Against the Mainstream thread) (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/13547-bad-volcano-science-yahoo-science-news]St. Helen's 2004 (Bad Media thread)[/URL] *Link Updated!

[URL="http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/13594-will-lunar-eclipse-cause-mt-st-helens-blow) *Link Updated!

St. Helen's 2005 (Universe Today Article) (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/31260-infrared-view-mount-saint-helens) *Link Updated!

St. Helen's 2005 (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/15346-mt-st-helens) *Link Updated!

St. Helen's Updates 2006-2008 (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/41434-Mt-St-Helens-(Mt-Slab)-Update) *Link Updated!

St. Helen's 2006 (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/41198-mount-st-helens-grows-fin#post738574) *Link Updated!

St. Helen's 2007 (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/52851-mount-st-helens-glowing-again) *Link Updated!

St. Helen's goes to sleep 2008 (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/76470-mt-st-helens-finished-maybel) *Link Updated!

dgavin
2008-Sep-30, 07:24 PM
Well, it's really looking as if St. Helens has gone back to sleep.

Since the USGS Announcement about it returning to slumber in July, earthquake activity has fallen to pre-1980 background levels, with the exception of the fairly continuous rock slide signals.

However this doesn't mean the end of the posts! Coming soon as the information is available I'll be posting on the Post-Eruption erosion patterns, and similar information.

However the cool imagery will not be coming out as often, the USGS is still taking the pictures, but their web site isn't being updated as often with them. (Understandable with all the activity in Alaska they have been concentrating on)

In other Cascade Volcano news, USGS has added more monitoring equipment at the Three Sisters uplift site, and surprisingly at Crater Lake. I suspect the later has more to do with hydrology equipment then seismology, but I haven't found any more details on it other then new equipment was installed.

BigDon
2008-Oct-09, 04:34 AM
I look forward Mr. Gavin.

dgavin
2008-Oct-28, 06:55 PM
Well, St. Helens may be asleep again, but even snoring giants can cause damage.

The Brutus camera was the victim of a rock slide.

Brutus Site Camera...Rest in Pieces (http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Imgs/Jpg/MSH/MSH08/MSH08_brutus_camera_resting_place_09-29-08_med.jpg)

the Glacier toes (http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Imgs/Jpg/MSH/MSH08/MSH08_aerial_crater_glacier_toes_09-29-08_med.jpg) are still growing and moving, and getting a new infusion of Snow already. Up Close and Personal (http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Imgs/Jpg/MSH/MSH08/MSH08_aerial_crater_glacier_surface_09-29-08_med.jpg)with a Glaicer Toe.

From the Weekly Status report


One party also mapped out the margin of the west arm of Crater Glacier and found that it had advanced 5 to 15 meters along its breadth since July 31, 2008.

Now that is a speedy little glacier! Now that the two glacier toes are merging, we have the potential to see something new, possibly a Small lake/pond forming in the depression behind them.

If this does happen, it can be expected that such a pond will grow in size as the Glacier debris piles up, and eventually erode through the debris dam, and cause a small flash flood into the lowitt falls area. This would really be a cool thing if it does happen, because it would be likely the first small example of the larger versions of this that happened at the end of the last ice age.

Time will tell if watter pooling does start up behind the glaciers, probably next summer, or summer after will show indecators of this or not.

chrissy
2008-Oct-28, 10:19 PM
This will be great to know how rapid a lake/pool will form, thank you dgavin for this update, I will check in to see what occurs from time to time.

chrissy

redshifter
2008-Oct-30, 12:56 AM
Anyone ever been to the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument? It's spectacular! From the Jonston ridge observation center, you can see how the north side of the mountain collapsed. It's amazing to see how the blast affected the trees, depending on terrain and distance from the mountain.

Gillianren
2008-Oct-30, 03:26 AM
I've been, but not in a long time. Maybe I'll go again next summer.

Swift
2008-Oct-30, 03:43 PM
Anyone ever been to the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument? It's spectacular! From the Jonston ridge observation center, you can see how the north side of the mountain collapsed. It's amazing to see how the blast affected the trees, depending on terrain and distance from the mountain.
I was there in about 1993. Yes, very very neat.

chrissy
2008-Oct-30, 10:37 PM
I am not that lucky, it would be an expensive trip. :(

dgavin
2008-Nov-25, 08:01 PM
Updates from USGS on the Cascade Volcano's


Recent Observations:

Volcano seismicity at Mount St. Helens and elsewhere along the Cascades has remained at low levels over the past week.

On November 17, a small swarm of earthquakes was initiated by a M1.8 shock beneath the summit of Mount Hood.

A new data link was established between CVO and the Pierce County Emergency Operations Center in Tacoma to access real-time data streams from two new seismic/deformation monitoring stations located on the west flank of Mount Rainier.

The U.S. Geological Survey and University of Washington continue to monitor these volcanoes closely and will issue additional updates and changes in alert level as warranted.

dgavin
2008-Dec-26, 08:01 PM
Glacier Toe still advancing! (http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Imgs/Jpg/MSH/MSH08/MSH08_crater_glacier_toe_from_sugarbowl_12-04-08_med.jpg) (Extreamly Hi Def (http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Imgs/Jpg/MSH/MSH08/MSH08_crater_glacier_toe_from_sugarbowl_12-04-08.jpg)) Looks like it has started to overcome the Lowitt Falls ravine.

Will be intresting to see what will be the outcome of that.

At this point I only have a few guesses. The merging Glacier toes will be resplit, or the Ravine will slowly be filled in with rock and ice, later to rebuild itself in an accelerated manner when the ice melts.

mugaliens
2008-Dec-26, 11:12 PM
Anyone ever been to the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument? It's spectacular! From the Jonston ridge observation center, you can see how the north side of the mountain collapsed. It's amazing to see how the blast affected the trees, depending on terrain and distance from the mountain.

I went in Aug 2007. My family and I spent all day exploring all over the place. Boy were we tired!

dgavin
2010-Jan-14, 07:55 PM
Haven't forgotten about this thread, there just hasn't been a whole lot to report.

Seismograph readings have been steadily declining at St. Helen's, to their current point of almost no activity other then occasional land slides or glacier movement.

Probably the best indicator that the activity at St. Helen's is over.

I have not been able to post any detail on the erosion patterns at Lowit falls as I had promised. USGS has also cut back publishing their regular pictorial and informational updates. Granted it is likely due to them being busy with three Alaskan volcanoes last year, and now Mt. Mayon.

Hopefully come spring they will release some back dated imagery of St. Helen's as there hasn't been any since august.

For the rest of the Cascades, it's also been very quiet time geologically. Even Sea-MT. Axial has been quiet. The only news here is that the Three Sisters has a new Broad-Band seismograph that also joined the list of USGS webicroders.

aurora
2010-Feb-16, 08:23 PM
This isn't really geology related, more weather related, but there is a current story about a person that fell into the crater.

Rescue attempts are going on since last night.

Gillianren
2010-Feb-16, 10:20 PM
Hey, they could have worse weather for it. It's only a little overcast up here in Olympia right now, and I don't think it's actually pouring anywhere around here!

slang
2010-Feb-17, 12:46 AM
BBC News: Body recovered (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8518786.stm) :(

dgavin
2010-Aug-22, 09:30 PM
No new imagry yet, however...

There were two quakes this last week, both 2.2 in magnitude, plus there have been very faint readings of short tearm harmonic tremors, 7 of them today alone. This doesn't indicate she is waking up again, but it's been the first readings like these in almost two years.

Swift
2010-Aug-23, 12:46 AM
September 12 and 13 are the scheduled dates for the next massive eruption, since those are the dates I will be visiting. ;)

dgavin
2010-Aug-23, 07:05 PM
There was in improperly worded VONA notice sent out on the cascade range today (it's details ware blank) , after checking seismographs and web cams, there is an extremely tiny ash plume coming out of the dome today at St. Helen's. It's very tiny, not even reaching the height of the crater walls. I expect the notice was likely about that small plume.

There were also two more longer duration harmonic tremors today on the south face.

Not sure what to exactly make of this yet, as there are no EQ swarms it doesn't appear to be any sort of eruptive behavior. My best guess is this might just be some sort of out-gassing from a gas pocket that had been sealed for some time, or something along those lines.

jj_0001
2010-Aug-23, 09:22 PM
September 12 and 13 are the scheduled dates for the next massive eruption, since those are the dates I will be visiting. ;)

Well, bother, I'll be down in Calabasas (Ca) that week.

dgavin
2010-Aug-25, 06:43 PM
Nothing official yet from USGS. On the 24th a small swarm of earth quakes began and continues around St. Helen's and there was another long term harmonic tremor (lasting around 1.5 hours) today.

Far as i can tell this doesn't appear to be anything odd or worry some, but is just likely post eruption activity. The signals are strongest around the Cedar Flats area and less strong (if registering at all) on the mountain proper, indicating that it's most likely not related to St. Helen's volcanic chimney directly.

dgavin
2010-Aug-26, 07:24 PM
Not sure what to really make of this yet, but the harmonic tremors around the cedar flats area has intensified, in duration, frequency and amplitude today, and are now starting to show up on other siesmographs around the St. Helen's area. There is still a lack of consitant EQ swarms that usualy indicates magmatic activity.

This might still qulify as "Background" activity, so USGS's press release tomorrow should indicate if this is notable or not.

dgavin
2010-Aug-27, 07:09 PM
This mornings update from USGS is late.

The activity on the siesmographs has seemed to have settled back down since yesterday, with the exception of another tremor lasting about 2 hours in the Cedar Flats area again about 3 hours ago.

I'm going to go out on a limb and say this is probably nothing other then post eruption grumblings, though I'd of prefered to have waited for USGS's weekly report.

dgavin
2010-Aug-28, 03:37 PM
Ok, USGS report out and the official word is nothing more then background activity, with a note that some geologists were doing field studies on the dome.

On another note they indicated they are installing addition seismographs and deformation monitoring equipment at Crater Lake. This isn't in response to any seismic event I've seen over the years, so it is likely just they got some budgeting and decided to put equipment on the one mountain that only had a single seismograph.

*edit to add*

The harmonic tremor activity is appearing even fainter on the St. Helens seismographs today. Looking at it I still think a sealed gas pocket rupturing is the best explaination for this seiries of events. I can't think of any other reason then was a VONA notice last week.

Ara Pacis
2010-Aug-29, 04:52 PM
The harmonic tremor activity is appearing even fainter on the St. Helens seismographs today. Looking at it I still think a sealed gas pocket rupturing is the best explaination for this seiries of events. I can't think of any other reason then was a VONA notice last week.

Who fed the mountain beans?

dgavin
2010-Sep-01, 06:28 PM
Nothing but wind storms the last few days at St. Helens. No tremors, no EQ swarms, so what ever was going on in the cedar flats area may be over with.

dgavin
2010-Sep-07, 06:47 PM
USGS report is out an includes no mention of these recent events around the cedar flats area. So backgraound activity, albeit some intresting reading for background activity.

dgavin
2011-Feb-15, 08:15 PM
After so long long being quiet, our sleeping Continental Volcano, St. Helen's, has spoken up. Yesterday it was rocked by a 4.3 magnitude Quake (Felt in Portland, Vancouver and other regional towns) followed by various aftershocks, some of which were also felt. The location was 8km North and about 2-4km depth, close to the Johnston Ridge Observatory. While this appears to be Slip/Fault activity, it was at the exact location and depth of the 5.5 mag that preceded the initial eruptions 30 years ago.

There does not appear to be any indication of volcanic tremors, but It's definitely got peoples attention.

jj_0001
2011-Feb-15, 09:01 PM
After so long long being quiet, our sleeping Continental Volcano, St. Helen's, has spoken up. Yesterday it was rocked by a 4.3 magnitude Quake (Felt in Portland, Vancouver and other regional towns) followed by various aftershocks, some of which were also felt. The location was 8km North and about 2-4km depth, close to the Johnston Ridge Observatory. While this appears to be Slip/Fault activity, it was at the exact location and depth of the 5.5 mag that preceded the initial eruptions 30 years ago.

There does not appear to be any indication of volcanic tremors, but It's definitely got peoples attention.

Any indication if it could be inflation or deflation? I don't know how to read the technical information to know which piece of what slipped which way.

dgavin
2011-Feb-16, 08:11 PM
Any indication if it could be inflation or deflation? I don't know how to read the technical information to know which piece of what slipped which way.

USGS is attributing it to "faults along the seismic zone to slip in response to the magma withdrawal". The withdraw being in the form of the already erupted magma. There is still no indication of any volcanic tremors today, althogh there's been a few more minor after shocks.

St. Heles itself and the surrounding region is not showing any signs of deflation however. This is likely due the the very cyclic nature of the volcano. It's deep magma pool seems to recharge at a rate of every 200 years or so, followed by a 30-50 period of activity. Because of the slower but constant influx of magma at 12-8km depth, there may not be the usual inflation/deflation. The Magma pool may always stay presuraized enough that the ground above is always 'inflated'. Atleast thats my best guess.

It's when the pool at the 12-8km starts to inject Magma into the pool at 2km depth, that there is detectable inflation and volcanic tremors on the mountain.

Intrestingly enough USGS also is saying the the location of the volcano (venting) is related to the stike/slip fault itself. "The fault zone likely exerts control on the location of Mount St. Helens volcano. " I'm not sure but it sounds like this means that if the Stike/Slip fratcutred into a new direction somehow that the volcanic vent in that region might change locations as well.

dgavin
2011-Feb-18, 08:33 PM
Three more minor quakes here, 2 yesterday, one today so far. Still no evidence for any magma movement. The Baja 5.1 earthquake at 9:47am today was picked up nicely on the St. Helens siemographs however.

Inclusa
2011-Feb-20, 03:44 AM
Ok. We possibly cannot say "extinct" volcanoes.

Tobin Dax
2011-Feb-20, 05:50 AM
Yesterday it was rocked by a 4.3 magnitude Quake (Felt in Portland, Vancouver and other regional towns) followed by various aftershocks, some of which were also felt.

This is what my mother called a "rumble"? Okay, they might not have felt it (too far south, probably), but that's a decent little quake.

Gillianren
2011-Feb-20, 06:25 AM
Ok. We possibly cannot say "extinct" volcanoes.

Actually, we can. There are places where there were volcanoes caused by mantle plumes past which the plate has drifted. There simply isn't anything to power those volcanoes anymore. However, no one who knows anything about vulcanology would even consider the idea that Mount St. Helens, or Mount Rainier, or any of the other volcanoes up and down our coast, are extinct. I think they've even decided Mount Mazama can't even be considered extinct.

dgavin
2011-Feb-20, 01:11 PM
Actually, we can. There are places where there were volcanoes caused by mantle plumes past which the plate has drifted. There simply isn't anything to power those volcanoes anymore. However, no one who knows anything about vulcanology would even consider the idea that Mount St. Helens, or Mount Rainier, or any of the other volcanoes up and down our coast, are extinct. I think they've even decided Mount Mazama can't even be considered extinct.

No, Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake) is most definately NOT extinct. It's eruption was only 7000 years ago. Water temperature measurements indicate a sharp 3.89c temperature increase at the floor of the lake, indicating that the lake is being warmed by heat from the volcano.

That eruption was a VEI 7 (rather forceful for a single stratovolcano) so it's likely that it would take some time for the magma chamber to refill itself after that caldera collaspe eruption.

Mt. Jefferson however might be considered extinct, as there hasn't been any signs of activity at it for some 50,000 years. But even that one still has some active hydrothermal systems, and is only considered dormant.

As you said, extinct usualy means the the volcano has moved past the source of the magma that fed it. Quiet volcanoes in and around an active magma system are considerted Inactive (Had Eruption in last 1000 years) or Dormant (Last eruption > 1000 years)

dgavin
2011-Feb-20, 01:25 PM
Three more earthquakes since last report, smallish from 1 - 2 magnitude. USGS officially saying that it's from tectonic stresses and is not magma related. Two of the quakes were under the mountain this time (moved south) but as it's still along that slip/strike fault that isnt unexpected.

dgavin
2011-Feb-23, 07:28 PM
Nothign but windstorms on the siesmographs last few days. Likely this episode of fault earthquakes is over.

dgavin
2011-Feb-24, 08:43 PM
A small earthquake today, and what appears to be harmonic tremors on the siemographs at Helens and Hood both starting about 10am this morning.

However after checking more these tremors seem to be originating around the Newberry Caldera region. It doesn't appear to be volcanic tremors, nor wind storms. My best guess here is slow sliping like motion at a fault.

dgavin
2011-Feb-25, 08:33 PM
Another small quake, and more of the harmonic like reading at various stations.

While it is windy today, I've compared about 6 siesmographs from oregon to washighton that ahve the same reading, and the patterns of strong to week peeks match up on most. If it was wind the patterns would be different due to the differences in localized wind gusting.

Considering the same pattern is showing up from northern Washington Siesmographs, to Southern Oregon ones, at this point I would say the readings are of a deep slow movement of the plates, or the magma, in the melt boundy zone of the Jan-De-Fuca/American subduction zone itself.

It's still possible it could be wind related readings, will know better once we have a few more calm days here. Granted, there was almost no wind yesterday during the periods of it's readings according to NOAA data for Redmond Or.

dgavin
2011-Feb-28, 08:44 PM
St. Helens have been quiet since last report. USGS is indicating the Cascades at Background levels of activity.

As to the other siesmograph readings there is a major windstorm going on now at Newberry, and it's definately showing a different pattern then the ones seen before.

I've attached yesterdays siesmograph, showing the windstorms at the bottom, and the other readings at the top.

Hopefully someone may recognize the patten of the readings at top, all I really know is at best, just guesses.

dgavin
2011-Mar-01, 07:46 PM
Mystery Solved on the odd siemographs readings.

The top style that has been going on for a while is just wind without rain, the one on bottom that is more famlliar, is wind -and- rain.

The Rain adds a high freqency component to the wind signatures. Considering it usualy is always raining in oregon, I haven't seen the other signature before where there is no rain, but only a lot of wind.

NOAA still indicates periods of calm during the low-feq only readings, however I checked some additioanal weather archives and found windy conditions recorded.

So on the above sample I posted, lookign at a wind storm in the morning and a rain/wind storm in afternoon.

I don't have an good explaination as to the day where I matched the pulse freqency (Strong/weak patterns) of them between siesmograph stations. It may be that was a day where the winds had regional 'gusts' instead of localized ones.

jlhredshift
2011-Mar-01, 07:53 PM
dgavin, The traces certainly go to the sensitivity of the seismographs, but I was wondering, there are many times here in the Midwest that lighting accompanies wind and rain, like two nights ago. If the lightning is close enough the BOOM shakes the whole house, like two nights ago. Have you seen examples of lightning in the traces?

Gillianren
2011-Mar-01, 08:12 PM
Considering it usualy is always raining in oregon, I haven't seen the other signature before where there is no rain, but only a lot of wind.

It is, but more importantly, it is usually (at least at this time of year) raining in Washington. Where, incidentally, we don't reliably get lightning.

Tobin Dax
2011-Mar-02, 12:36 AM
It is, but more importantly, it is usually (at least at this time of year) raining in Washington. Where, incidentally, we don't reliably get lightning.

That's pretty much true in western Oregon, too. Growing up, I rarely experienced a thunderstorm like those I've been through in Illinois and Kentucky.

dgavin
2011-Mar-02, 01:05 AM
dgavin, The traces certainly go to the sensitivity of the seismographs, but I was wondering, there are many times here in the Midwest that lighting accompanies wind and rain, like two nights ago. If the lightning is close enough the BOOM shakes the whole house, like two nights ago. Have you seen examples of lightning in the traces?

I haven't sene them on the newer webicorders yet, but there are plenty of Lightning examples samples from older AS-1 type siesmographs I have looked at.

I'll keep that in mind to check the next time a lightning storm blows through these parts.

dgavin
2011-Mar-16, 06:52 PM
Intresting events at St. Helens, 3 minor quakes today, and a huge avalanche was recorded eailier this week. The 3 quakes are at the 8km-11km depths, placing them in/around the mid/main magma chamber. Nothing to worry over when they are that deep.

There was also a nice avalanche picked up on the siesmographs at Mt. Hood today too.

Swift
2011-Mar-16, 07:18 PM
Spring thaw causing the avalanches?

Gillianren
2011-Mar-16, 08:43 PM
Possibly. Here in Olympia, the temperature hasn't dipped below freezing in the last two weeks.

dgavin
2011-Mar-17, 07:26 PM
Were starting to get the wetter heavier snows, as opposed to the light powders seen during the coldest part of season. When you put heavy damp snow on lighter drier powder, I think you get prime avalance conditions. Most of the mountains are still in the 18-28f temp range, so thawing probably doesn't account for much of the avalances yet.

There was another avalanche today at St. Helens, but a small one.

Swift
2011-May-11, 03:32 PM
From National Geographic (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/05/110510-mount-st-helens-volcano-eruption-3-d-science-first-geology/)

Volcanologists have created the first ever 3-D simulation of the cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens, which happened 31 years ago this month.

The model backs up current ideas about what led to the 1980 blast, which killed 57 people. The real news, though, is that the simulation could save lives in the future by helping researchers predict how dormant volcanoes may lose their tempers.

....


Soon after the Mount St. Helens eruption, scientists began trying to decipher why the disaster zone was so widespread and extended so far north.

One theory suggested that a single, sustained jet of volcanic material had shot out of the loosened north face at supersonic speeds. Later research determined that the eruption was sloppier—more like a grenade blast.

But when the grenade scenario was plugged into older, 2-D simulations, the virtual eruption failed to properly re-create the St. Helens-area devastation.

Those models looked at the physics of the explosion and the effects of the surrounding topography on falling ash and debris as separate factors—and ignored gravity's influence altogether, according to the authors of the new study.

The new model, however, factored in all these dynamics in 3-D. The new element, gravity—which created faster ash-and-gas flows by pulling debris more rapidly downhill—was found to be key in re-creating the scorched region.

The result is the first simulation of the Mount St. Helens eruption to match the blast's speed and the actual damage boundaries, the researchers say.

dgavin
2011-May-11, 07:17 PM
Nice Find Swift!

Tobin Dax
2011-May-11, 08:40 PM
Very cool. Thanks, Swift.

dgavin
2011-May-16, 06:39 PM
I'm still having trouble finding new imagry of lowit falls and the galcier toes advancment. After two years without any new images for the area, I'm assuming that USGS pulled the camera equipment out after they downgraded St. Helen's to condition green.

It's sort of a shame as the evolution of erosion activity at St. Helen's seems as important as it's eruptions are.

dgavin
2012-Jan-19, 08:31 PM
Yesterday there was a very low level (intensity) Vocanic Tremor at St. Helens, starting abruptly around 5:30 am PST, and contining on with less intensity until the late evening. It was picked up at 4 out of 5 of the area's siesmographs, and also at Mt. Rainier's siesmograph station.

This appears to something of the order of a shifting of magma in St. Helens lower magma chamber as opposed magma moving through rock in a chimney from the upper chamber. It had a very distictive signature that looked more like wind storm readings, expect it started without any build up, and then slowly dwindled in intensity over time, and the recorded winds was only in the 5-10mph category and not able to produce such a prominent reading.

My guess here is again, that something caused the magma in the lower chamber, to shift or churn around. Possible it was a partial chamber collapse as there were 2 avalance like readings on some of the siesmographs just before this happened.

Gillianren
2012-Jan-19, 09:34 PM
Could there have been avalanches? We're having unusual-for-us weather around here.

dgavin
2012-Jan-20, 01:11 AM
It's possible the two events before the tremors were, but the tremor part lasted for near 9 hours, I've never heard of an avalance lasting that long.

Gillianren
2012-Jan-20, 02:12 AM
True enough.

dgavin
2012-Jan-20, 07:21 PM
Oh wow, I was right and wrong, it was definately somethign moving...but it wasn't magma...

It was a stream nearing flood stage! Which explains it's long long duration. I'm assuming it's in the lowitt falls area but webcams still obscured so can't visually verify.

Gillianren
2012-Jan-20, 08:09 PM
Yes, that makes sense as well!

Tobin Dax
2012-Jan-20, 09:20 PM
That fits with the news that I've been hearing.

dgavin
2012-Jan-23, 07:51 PM
Well third time is a charm, it -was- movement, I had that part correct, but not a kind I've ever seen on a siesmograph before, which is why I could not pin it down.

It wasn't flooding though, it was Glaciers! According to USGS reports there has been a lot of Glacier movement at Rainier and St. Helens due to the unusual warm/cold/warm/cold weather patterns.

dgavin
2012-Jan-25, 08:47 PM
There was a regular 3.4 quake near St. Helens (15 km) in the Elk Lake region, while it's at the depth of St. Helen's Magma pool, this appears to be a Strike/Slip Quake. It had a few aftershocks in the 1-2 mag range.

dgavin
2012-Jan-31, 08:15 PM
USGS comfirmed that the 3.4 was Fault activity with last weekends weekends updates.

dgavin
2012-Feb-17, 08:51 PM
dgavin, The traces certainly go to the sensitivity of the seismographs, but I was wondering, there are many times here in the Midwest that lighting accompanies wind and rain, like two nights ago. If the lightning is close enough the BOOM shakes the whole house, like two nights ago. Have you seen examples of lightning in the traces?

I FINNALY got a sample for you, sorry it took so long, but oregon doesn't get a lot of Lightning. the Long thin spikes are the lightning events the seismograph picked up.

16297

Gillianren
2012-Feb-18, 07:50 AM
Yeah, one of the only things I miss about living in California over living in Western Washington is thunderstorms. Rain, we get. Thunder? Seldom.

Van Rijn
2012-Feb-18, 08:47 AM
Yeah, one of the only things I miss about living in California over living in Western Washington is thunderstorms. Rain, we get. Thunder? Seldom.

Well, don't visit Sacramento, as we rarely get thunderstorms. I was amazed a year or two back when we finally had a truly respectable thunderstorm, something that came close to what I remember from the Midwest. I haven't heard any thunder this winter.

Tobin Dax
2012-Feb-19, 06:01 AM
Yeah, one of the only things I miss about living in California over living in Western Washington is thunderstorms. Rain, we get. Thunder? Seldom.

I'll trade you. I've been east of the Mississippi river for nearly ten years (in Illinois and in Kentucky), and I cannot sleep during a thunderstorm. This annoys me to no end.

Tensor
2012-Feb-19, 04:21 PM
I'll trade you. I've been east of the Mississippi river for nearly ten years (in Illinois and in Kentucky), and I cannot sleep during a thunderstorm. This annoys me to no end.

Hehehehehe, try Southwest Florida from May-September, there's a thunderstorm almost every day, into the night and sometimes into the early morning. Although I have to say the weirdest storm I saw was in Iceland. There was thunder, visible lightning (one bolt hit about a half a mile from us) but it was snowing, not raining.

Ara Pacis
2012-Feb-19, 07:53 PM
Hehehehehe, try Southwest Florida from May-September, there's a thunderstorm almost every day, into the night and sometimes into the early morning. Although I have to say the weirdest storm I saw was in Iceland. There was thunder, visible lightning (one bolt hit about a half a mile from us) but it was snowing, not raining.We get Thundersnows in the Midwest too.

Tensor
2012-Feb-19, 11:16 PM
We get Thundersnows in the Midwest too.

I've heard that, but I spent my first 19 years there, and I never saw one. Or, more likely, being young and self-centered, just didn't pay any attention to it.

jlhredshift
2012-Feb-20, 03:22 AM
Thank you dgavin, luv thunderstorms, and I've seen and felt both kinds. I lived in Illinois for 38 years, Florida for 13, and now Ohio for nine. Once, I was watching a storm out my bedroom window and a bolt hit a telephone pole ground diagonal wire fifty feet away. The boom, flash, and concussion seemed simultaneous. I couldn't see or hear for several minutes. The ground steamed for awhile though.

Swift
2012-Feb-20, 03:36 AM
We get Thundersnows in the Midwest too.
I've heard them a few times in Ohio and was in the middle of one once, though the lightening was all cloud-to-cloud (good thing too, I was hiking in the woods).

Ara Pacis
2012-Feb-20, 10:26 AM
I've heard that, but I spent my first 19 years there, and I never saw one. Or, more likely, being young and self-centered, just didn't pay any attention to it.well, I did see a couple flashes and a boom a couple weeks ago with snow, but it is rare. However, in 8th grade I remember a really big thundersnow where it was flashing and booming like crazy and the snow was coming coming down fast. I think school was canceled that day.

On the news yesterday they showed footage of storm damage in Alabama and it looks like there was snow falling on the downed trees. I don't know if it was a thundersnow or illusion or if the weather changed over after the storms.

Tensor
2012-Feb-20, 02:56 PM
well, I did see a couple flashes and a boom a couple weeks ago with snow, but it is rare. However, in 8th grade I remember a really big thundersnow where it was flashing and booming like crazy and the snow was coming coming down fast. I think school was canceled that day.

On the news yesterday they showed footage of storm damage in Alabama and it looks like there was snow falling on the downed trees. I don't know if it was a thundersnow or illusion or if the weather changed over after the storms.

It was probably a weather change after the storms. The storms precede the cold fronts, especially at this time of year in the deep south. It's quite warm here in Florida and if it he temperature gradient of the front is steep enough (which I hear it is, the same front came through last night, without the severe weather, and drop our temps 10-15 degrees) you get the severe weather first. Then, if there is still enough moisture in the air once the cold front passes through, it can turn to snow.

dgavin
2012-Aug-05, 03:56 PM
Well there is still a complete lack of pictures of the glacier toes and Lowitt falls area's so my promise to monitor those so many years ago never happened.

However a few week ago a I read a printed update that the glacier toes have reached Lowitt falls, and are starting to spill over the falls area. I wish I could of found a picture of this, but I've been unsucessfull.

dgavin
2012-Aug-06, 08:42 PM
USGS installed some new equipment this last week on the old '80-'86 lava dome. This includes something they are calling a "highly sensative" gravity monitoring device. I suspect this might be an experimental type of new volcanic monitoring device they are field testing at St. Helens.

Dave J
2012-Aug-13, 12:04 AM
Haven't seen any new photos in quite a while, so did some searching. No particularly good photos but did find that, for $500 ($400 is tax deductable donation to MSHI), you can join the MSH Institute for an authorized climb intro the crater right up to the glacier face. It's apparently a pretty active place, with frequent loud impact sounds as rocks/ice fall off the face.
Meanwhile, still looking for "toe shots", see what the glacier is doing as it approaches the big canyon (upper Loowit falls I think?).

Meanwhile, recent youTube videos (south face climbs to the rim) show the dome still steaming quietly...what an amazing place that's got to be! Heck, anywhere on/near that mountain...

keep 'em coming, DG...

dgavin
2012-Oct-18, 06:56 PM
Finnaly after years, USGS is posting photos again, the most notable is the one of the Loowit Canyon and Mesa, Features that have formed just in the last few decade's, instead of the millions of years that normally takes. A testimony to the power of water eroding new geological features.

17631

All of the Aug 12 field images can be browsed at the following url

http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/cvo/msh_2012_fw_gallery.html

dgavin
2012-Nov-16, 07:48 PM
There have been rumors floating around the last few weeks that St. Helens is becoming more active again. These rumors are just not true. There have been a few minor earthquake swarms, but these have been some 10-20km south-southeast of St. Helens and there is nothing volcanic behind them.

dgavin
2013-Apr-08, 07:45 PM
It's been fairly quiet at St. Helen's. There was a nice looking Avalanche signature on the seismographs last night, with a .6 Mag.

Avalanche signatures are fairly easy to spot on seismographs, as they curve up to a peak amplitude, and then curve back down. Very similar to how a bell curve looks on a graph. Very similar to wind signatures, but they don't tend to happen in groups like wind gusts.

dgavin
2013-Aug-20, 07:03 PM
As promised a long long time ago, images showing the still very dynamic nature of Mt. St. Helens, specifically at the Loowit falls area.

Loowit Falls in 2007 (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/images/image_mngr/900-999/img973_900w_675h.jpg)

Where did Loowit falls go? Same region in 2013 (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/images/image_mngr/1200-1299/img1214_900w_675h.jpg)

As evident, the glaciers have now completely covered the falls, and are still advancing down Loowit canyon. You can still see part of the small peek in the left on this second image, thats is the same peak what was directly left of Loowit falls in 2007. The lovely pink and yellow dactice peak in the center behind the falls in 2007, has also been removed by the slow but relentless motion of the glacier.

St. Helens is still such a dynamic place, seeing water falls and peaks form, only be ground away in a few years, instead of the millions of years that normally takes.

dgavin
2013-Sep-12, 04:25 AM
I've been looking at the GPS readings at St. Helens, which started being monitored in 2009. Mt. St. Helens has a very interesting cycle of uplift/subsidence that exactly 1 year in length, involving a 20 cm average change in that years cycle of uplift and then subsidence. In the south areas of the volcano, the GPS are slowly Subsiding, indicating a trend that there is less uplift and more subside over time, about a 4 CM total subsidence since 2009. In the North area, that trend is reversed, with about a 1cm over all gain of uplift since 2009. In the Central area's while the cycle is still present, there is no net uplift or subsidence.

Two things are evident from this trend. It's magma pool is still refilling, meaning that additional eruptions are still possible (though remote chance) and that the upper magma pool seems to be moving slowly to the north.

It is possible that in a few thousand (to 10 of thousands) years of eruptions that St. Helens could spawn a sister volcano, and become very similar to the Three Sisters and Broken Top in it's formation.

Nick Theodorakis
2013-Sep-12, 02:22 PM
Interesting. Is this a new and unique observation that you made? Are you writing it up for publication somewhere?

Nick

dgavin
2013-Sep-14, 03:14 PM
Nick,

I would not even no where to begin with something like that. I used to send my observations to USGS and get feed back on them. But since the budget issues, there has been no feed back on anything from USGS or PNSN for close to 6 years. There might already be papers out there on the GPS trend's and I just haven't seen them. It's fairly evident when you look at the GPS readings and charts, so I assume there is something out there published about it.

Swift
2013-Sep-17, 12:35 PM
Nick,

I would not even no where to begin with something like that. I used to send my observations to USGS and get feed back on them. But since the budget issues, there has been no feed back on anything from USGS or PNSN for close to 6 years. There might already be papers out there on the GPS trend's and I just haven't seen them. It's fairly evident when you look at the GPS readings and charts, so I assume there is something out there published about it.
If you were interested in publishing this, you might contact the geology department of one of the local universities, or a local natural history museum, and see if there was
someone interested in collaborating on a paper.

BigDon
2013-Oct-05, 02:03 AM
Well, don't visit Sacramento, as we rarely get thunderstorms. I was amazed a year or two back when we finally had a truly respectable thunderstorm, something that came close to what I remember from the Midwest. I haven't heard any thunder this winter.

No, instead you get the periodic bout of eight straight days of 35 mile per hour winds with an air temperature of 112F (45C).

I had to move furniture in that on at least two occasions.

dgavin
2013-Oct-14, 04:38 AM
About a hour and a half ago there was a 1.2 mag on the surface inside the crater of St. Helens, with a wave form that matches glacier movement. It's likely one of the glacier toes is on the move again.

dgavin
2014-Jan-28, 08:13 PM
A small swarm of four, < 1 mag normal quakes yesterday followed by an unexpected 2.3 Mag Volcanic Tremor, at 1.1km depth, at 9:20 this morning lasting about a full minute.

While this has been the first real sign of magma still moving since the end of it's eurptive cycle the last time. It's a singular event, and is by no means an indication of new activity. Just rather notable now because of its magnitude.

dgavin
2014-Feb-12, 08:19 PM
The tremor a few weeks ago didn't make it onto USGS reports. It's been quiet since. Looks like it was just a burp. :D

dgavin
2014-Feb-27, 08:12 PM
Goat Mt. Swarm. So far 7 micro quakes, just 1km north of Goat Mountain (A little sister of St. Helens), and 5km West of St. Helens. Depth of these quakes is around 11km. They are not tremors, so it appears to just be split/coverging fault's activity, that is likey just west and below St. Helens magma chamber.

dgavin
2014-May-05, 02:18 PM
USGS last week posted a brief info statement that the upper magma chamber (4km depth) has been since last 2008 eruption, and still slowly refilling at St. Helens. This was determined by some minor uplift and INSARS detections. There have not been any indication's that an eruption is building, but St. Helen's while still condition green, has been placed back on the Active list.