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View Full Version : Let me get this straight- you spend 18 hours a day on your Blackberry?



banquo's_bumble_puppy
2008-Jul-15, 11:14 AM
There was s story on the CBC news this am about people getting injured due to overuse/repetitive use of their "Crackberrys"....neck strain...Blackberry thumb, etc...one woman interviewed said that she spends 18 hours a day on the thing. Okay....ummm what job is so important that you need to be tied to it every waking minute of a day? Get a life people.

LotusExcelle
2008-Jul-15, 11:16 AM
Soon we'll all be integrated, "Ghost in the Shell" style. We won't ever disconnect. Good times.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2008-Jul-15, 11:25 AM
your idea maybe...my idea of slavery

NEOWatcher
2008-Jul-15, 12:07 PM
Okay....ummm what job is so important that you need to be tied to it every waking minute of a day? Get a life people.
Who said anything about need? Remember this teen (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/65195-slow-news-day.html#post1270394)?

weatherc
2008-Jul-15, 12:11 PM
There was s story on the CBC news this am about people getting injured due to overuse/repetitive use of their "Crackberrys"....neck strain...Blackberry thumb, etc...one woman interviewed said that she spends 18 hours a day on the thing. Okay....ummm what job is so important that you need to be tied to it every waking minute of a day? Get a life people.Don't you realize that the companies that these people work for will just simply die if they aren't connected 24 hours a day?

Well, until they get laid off in a corporate reorganization, anyway.

mfumbesi
2008-Jul-15, 02:02 PM
How do you spend 18 hours a day doing the same thing, everyday.
This leaves only 6 hours for presumably sleeping, eating, answering natures call, talking, walking, driving, recharging the Blackberry..... I call shenanigans.
This is improbable. If this were true, I think she would have gone mad by now from sleep deprivation.

Whirlpool
2008-Jul-15, 02:21 PM
Don't you realize that the companies that these people work for will just simply die if they aren't connected 24 hours a day?

Well, until they get laid off in a corporate reorganization, anyway.

Got a work like that before , on call 24 hours a day .
Boss got mad when he called me up , and I didn't answered.
I was in the bathroom.

:neutral:

weatherc
2008-Jul-15, 02:22 PM
How do you spend 18 hours a day doing the same thing, everyday.
This leaves only 6 hours for presumably sleeping, eating, answering natures call, talking, walking, driving, recharging the Blackberry..... I call shenanigans.
This is improbable. If this were true, I think she would have gone mad by now from sleep deprivation.There are people that use their electronic leashes, er, Blackberries, at the same time that they're doing all of these things that you mentioned.

There's nothing like being in the men's room, and the guy next to you is holding a conversation on his Blackberry.

When I receive e-mails from people that were sent at ungodly hours, I lose all respect for them. That just shows me that their work is the only thing that matters to them in their entire lives.

NEOWatcher
2008-Jul-15, 02:24 PM
Got a work like that before , on call 24 hours a day .
Boss got mad when he called me up , and I didn't answered.
I was in the bathroom.
Of course the boss was mad. It meant that you must have taken time out before that to eat or drink something. :lol:

Whirlpool
2008-Jul-15, 02:25 PM
When I receive e-mails from people that were sent at ungodly hours, I lose all respect for them. That just shows me that their work is the only thing that matters to them in their entire lives.

Depends what kind of email they sent you and from what place they come from.

weatherc
2008-Jul-15, 02:30 PM
Depends what kind of email they sent you and from what place they come from.What kind of e-mail: work related.

Where they are being sent from: My time zone (in other words, they're not halfway around the world and e-mailing me work related information; they're up in the middle of the night sending me work e-mails).

korjik
2008-Jul-15, 02:51 PM
Soon we'll all be integrated, "Ghost in the Shell" style. We won't ever disconnect. Good times.

Cool. While you are connected, I can sneak into your place and take your stuff :)

mike alexander
2008-Jul-15, 05:30 PM
Ah. Go read Ray Bradbury's short story "The Murderer" (1953). You want to talk about SF predicting the future.

Suddenly I feel the need to purchase a quart of french vanilla ice cream...

mugaliens
2008-Jul-15, 07:11 PM
your idea maybe...my idea of slavery

It's like cell phones. I don't pay for a cell phone so they can stay in touch with me. I pay for a cell phone so that I can stay in touch with whomever I want.

slang
2008-Jul-15, 07:14 PM
When I receive e-mails from people that were sent at ungodly hours, I lose all respect for them. That just shows me that their work is the only thing that matters to them in their entire lives.

How can you know that? Maybe they work strange hours to spend more day time with their kids? Maybe they shifted their workschedule because they do have a life outside work? Perhaps they work 6 regular hours at work, and 2 in the evening from home?

Or did you mean co-workers, and flexible working times are not an option at your workplace?

weatherc
2008-Jul-16, 01:02 AM
How can you know that?They're pretty close co-workers, not just random people at the company I work for. I know the hours that they work and when they go home, and I know something of their life outside of work.


Maybe they work strange hours to spend more day time with their kids? Maybe they shifted their workschedule because they do have a life outside work? Perhaps they work 6 regular hours at work, and 2 in the evening from home?No. No. And no. If any of these were the case, I wouldn't have a problem with them.

And I've known a number of other people at other companies that are the same way. They are never disconnected from work. Ever. And they're not nearly important enough to merit being that connected, either (think low to middle management).

slang
2008-Jul-16, 08:10 AM
They're pretty close co-workers, not just random people at the company I work for. I know the hours that they work and when they go home, and I know something of their life outside of work.

Ah alright, I understood it as if you were speaking in general. Thanks for clearing that up.

Jay200MPH
2008-Jul-16, 10:54 AM
Technically I'm "on" my handy 24 hours a day since I never turn it off. But I get one call every 2-3 days on it (I'm real popular) so the actual usage time is a lot less. It all depends on how you count "online time." Incedently my employer doesn't know my number.

- J

Whirlpool
2008-Jul-16, 11:27 AM
In my previous position here where I worked, I have 2 handyphones working 24 hours , one is company HP and the other is one my Personal HP. I'm in the Supply Chain department, so you basically have the idea that I need to be available <on-call> 24 hours . Have no choice then, my boss need to get even my personal number.

But now , I've transferred to another department so it's a lot easier and quiet.
And I can sleep longer now.

Doodler
2008-Jul-16, 11:43 AM
How can you know that? Maybe they work strange hours to spend more day time with their kids? Maybe they shifted their workschedule because they do have a life outside work? Perhaps they work 6 regular hours at work, and 2 in the evening from home?

Or did you mean co-workers, and flexible working times are not an option at your workplace?

Nah, most people I know who are slaves to their cells take them on vacation, home, and just about everywhere else.

weatherc
2008-Jul-21, 04:46 PM
Here's a perfect example of what I've mentioned here:

One of the managers at the company I do contract work for is on vacation for a week in San Diego. He is pestering everyone with forwarded e-mails from his work Blackberry, which for some weird reason he has taken with him (I know for a fact that his boss would never require him to do this, so it's not like he has been pressured to have it with him by someone else).

There is nothing important enough going on that either his immediate superior or immediate subordinate couldn't take care of it without his input. His position also isn't of any real importance to the company in the grand scheme of things. He could easily be replaced by someone else just like him, or his duties could be divided up amongst a few other people. The fact that he keeps sending e-mails while on a week long vacation only tells me that this guy has a vastly overinflated sense of his own importance.

He is not impressing anyone by working during his vacation. He has only managed to annoy everyone.

SeanF
2008-Jul-21, 08:07 PM
The fact that he keeps sending e-mails while on a week long vacation only tells me that this guy has a vastly overinflated sense of his own importance.
On the other hand, maybe he has a pretty accurate sense of his own importance, and is worried the rest of you will figure it out, too.

weatherc
2008-Jul-21, 08:14 PM
On the other hand, maybe he has a pretty accurate sense of his own importance, and is worried the rest of you will figure it out, too.:lol:

Could be.

Larry Jacks
2008-Jul-21, 09:30 PM
When I worked for MCI about 15 years ago, it was said that if you didn't have a heart attack by the time you were 40, you weren't hard core. There was one guy there who thought the company revolved around him. He worked himself to a heart attack (age 37, IIRC). While he was out on sick leave, the company somehow survived without him. I guess the old quote from Charles de Gaulle is right: "The graveyards are full of indispensable men."

slang
2008-Jul-21, 10:35 PM
Nah, most people I know who are slaves to their cells take them on vacation, home, and just about everywhere else.

As do I, yet the only co-worker who has my cell number is the guy that sometimes needs a ride, when public transportation fails. Other than that, it's just wife, family and friends that have the number.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Jul-22, 08:28 PM
The philosophy I've always learned is that it's when someone manage to make themselves truly indispensable they should be fired immediately.

A company can't afford depending on any one person as you never know if they'll get hit by a bus and takes the company down with them.

This includes the CEO.

SeanF
2008-Jul-23, 01:36 PM
The philosophy I've always learned is that it's when someone manage to make themselves truly indispensable they should be fired immediately.

A company can't afford depending on any one person as you never know if they'll get hit by a bus and takes the company down with them.

This includes the CEO.
If they can be fired, they have not yet managed to make themselves truly indispensable. :)

01101001
2008-Jul-23, 03:11 PM
This might belong in General Science:

San Jose Mercury News: The CrackBerry yields clues on our data-driven desires (http://www.mercurynews.com/opinion/ci_9968140)

by Irving Biederman -- Harold Dornsife Chair in Neurosciences and Professor of Psychology and Computer Science (http://college.usc.edu/faculty/faculty1003105.html)


CrackBerry. Only a metaphor for our addiction-like urge to check e-mail? Or does the term shed light on a deep biological truth about our hunger for information?

Human-motivation studies traditionally stress well-established needs: food, water, sex, avoidance of pain. In a culture like ours, most of these needs can be satisfied easily. Just open the refrigerator door, or blow on that spoonful of hot soup. (Satisfying the need for sex may require a bit more doing.)

What's been missing from this scientific research is humans' non-stop need for more information.
[...]
The explanation involves opioids, one of many neurotransmitters - which are molecules that the neurons in our brain release to activate or inhibit other neighboring neurons.
[...]
No wonder we can't resist carrying a BlackBerry 24/7. Who knows what goodies it will deliver? A breaking-news item. A piece of gossip. An e-mail from a long-ago girlfriend. Another wirelessly and instantaneously delivered opioid hit.

I hope you got a few opioid hits, too, in learning about your inner infovore.

Argos
2008-Jul-23, 03:56 PM
I think virtue is in the middle. I keep connected on the Internet for a good 12 hours a day. In fact, that prevents me from getting a heart attack, since it is really enjoyable. But I dont like cell phones and I set up things so as to make a minimal use of them. And I shut down all communications [including Internet] at 7:00 pm and throughout the weekend [Im of relative importance - I own the business].

Whirlpool
2008-Jul-23, 03:59 PM
[Im of relative importance - I own the business].

Good for you , you have all the right to live peaceful on weekends or whatever day you wanted to take yourself off from work.

Argos
2008-Jul-23, 04:43 PM
Good for you , you have all the right to live peaceful on weekends or whatever day you wanted to take yourself off from work.

But, you see, Im not a millionaire. Maybe I could be faring batter if Id chosen to sacrifice my personal life and submit myself to social conventions. Ive never wanted to become a slave to work. Not having children helps to keep my principles.

I understand the pressure people are subjected to keep their jobs and families in a world where nothing seems to be enough. I understand the guy who tries to impress others with seemingly disporportionate amounts of work.