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Donnie B.
2008-Jul-16, 10:00 PM
Nope, not the Doctor (sorry BA), the band.

I've noticed a lot of media activity concerning The Who over the last week or so. MHD (the hi-def music channel) in particular has had at least two new documentary shows covering the history of the band, and last night they showed the (awful) movie version of Tommy.

Does anybody know what's driving this sudden wealth of Whovia? Have the surviving members (Daltry and Townshend) made a new album, or are they touring? Is it an important anniversary of something (like Kieth Moon's OD)?

Just wondering, not complaining. I'm a fan of theirs. Maybe not the world's biggest Whonut, but I do think Tommy was a seminal work in the genre and that Who's Next is one of the very best rock albums of all time. I'm enjoying the docs and all, but I would kind of like to know what's driving the phenomenon.

Kaptain K
2008-Jul-16, 10:16 PM
When/if you find out, please let us know!

Donnie B.
2008-Jul-16, 10:38 PM
I tried to do a little research, but I must say that the MHD web site is about as pathetic an effort as I've seen for a big-time media outlet. For instance, the schedule is only for today's shows -- don't bother going there if you want to know about that concert they played a couple days ago.

So far I've discovered that the first documentary I saw was "Amazing Journey: The Story of The Who / Six Quick Ones", a new film made just last year. Maybe it just became available for broadcast. That doesn't really explain why they showed the movie Tommy, though. Maybe just a creative programmer at MHD network put together a "theme of the week".

It also doesn't explain the other doc, but that may have been a different edit of the same material. At least one scene was the same in both.

JustAFriend
2008-Jul-16, 10:53 PM
A) Nostalgia

B) The guys have got to scrape together some money for retirement from somewhere....

Kaptain K
2008-Jul-16, 11:05 PM
A) Nostalgia

B) The guys have got to scrape together some money for retirement from somewhere....

Pete and Roger are set for life! So, I guess it must be A.

sarongsong
2008-Jul-17, 01:25 AM
The Who Tour USA 2008 (http://www.thewho.com/index.php)

...Oct. 24 TD Banknorth Garden, Boston, MA...

:)

Kaptain K
2008-Jul-17, 01:39 AM
If you want to know when a band is playing your town or where your favorite band is playing, I recommend Pollstar:

http://www.pollstar.com/

ginnie
2008-Jul-17, 02:03 AM
Just wondering, not complaining. I'm a fan of theirs. Maybe not the world's biggest Whonut, but I do think Tommy was a seminal work in the genre and that Who's Next is one of the very best rock albums of all time. I'm enjoying the docs and all, but I would kind of like to know what's driving the phenomenon.
I can't answer your question, but as a comment...
While I love both Tommy and Who's Next, there's something about Live at Leeds that is compelling. Keith, John and Pete just let go on their instruments - its a one time only, loud, and messy, uncontrolled blast. Not trying to reach perfection like in the studio, no overdubs and a very punkish attitude. To be played at maximum volume.
Pete was king in the studio, but the band as a whole shares the crown on this album.

You should enjoy this - WHOtube!
http://www.thewho.com/index.php?module=movies&movies_item_id=80

Parrothead
2008-Jul-17, 02:11 AM
Through The Who concert guide (http://www.thewholive.de/details/index.php?id=1743&Tracklisting=&GroupID=1&Tag=&Monat=&Jahr=2008&Stadt=&Halle=&LandID=0&StateID=0) site, I came across this article (http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jKOoUBo82mQrNwTylGoOLloRr9UAD91SSE380).


LOS ANGELES (AP) The Who was celebrated at a special concert by a few bands outside of their generation.

The legendary band was honored at the Saturday taping of the third annual "VH1 Rock Honors," which will air Thursday on the cable channel. Celebrity guests such as David Duchovny, Mila Kunis, Rainn Wilson and Adam Sandler introduced The Flaming Lips, Foo Fighters, Incubus, Tenacious D and Pearl Jam, who covered songs from such Who albums as "Tommy," "The Who Sell Out" and "Quadrophenia."

Who guitarist Pete Townshend and lead singer Roger Daltry closed the special concert at UCLA's Pauley Pavilion with a performance of some of the band's greatest hits. Original drummer Keith Moon died in London in 1978. Original bassist John Entwistle died in Las Vegas in 2002. Moon and Entwistle were remembered in pre-taped retrospectives during the over two-hour show. ...

May have had something to do with it, perhaps.

Donnie B.
2008-Jul-17, 02:17 AM
While I love both Tommy and Who's Next, there's something about Live at Leeds that is compelling. Keith, John and Pete just let go on their instruments - its a one time only, loud, and messy, uncontrolled blast. Not trying to reach perfection like in the studio, no overdubs and a very punkish attitude. To be played at maximum volume.
Pete was king in the studio, but the band as a whole shares the crown on this album.

Yes, I like LaL very much too. It definitely opened a lot of people's eyes about the band's live performances. Nobody did the controlled chaos thing better.

And watching Moon play the drums was and is a revelation. One of the interviewees put it best: "Well. He was the Jimi Hendrix of the drum kit, wa'nt'e?"

Fortunately, somebody was smart enough to put a camera on Keith during one of the Tommy concerts, and leave it there for the whole show. A long clip is in the documentary. Wow.... just wow. I sure wish he was still around, but that kind of energy always seems to fizzle out too soon.


Incidentally, tonight's installment on MHD was a recent concert of the current Who. Roger's voice has lost some power and all the top end (well, so has Pete's, especially noticable in the "it's only teenage wasteland" line in Baba) but instrumentally they are as fine as ever. I think Pete may actually be playing better than he ever has.

I'm going to see about the Boston show, or maybe take the trek down to Mohegan Sun. Boston comes earlier so their voices may be in better shape.

ginnie
2008-Jul-17, 07:08 PM
Have you seen the doc, "The Kids are Alright"? Oldie, but really good. You can see in it that Keith Moon and Ringo Starr got along quite well.
I have on DVD , "The Who - Live at the Isle of Wight Festival 1970".
Pretty darn good - and quite long. They do their early stuff, the hits and then a somewhat truncated Tommy. But it is so cool for them to perform it basically from the overture to the end with no distractions like 'guest' performers doing some of the songs. I don't need Phil Collins fiddling about! It just the four of them doing everything, so its sparse, somewhat primitive and as you said, "controlled chaos".

Donnie B.
2008-Jul-17, 07:56 PM
I haven't seen the Isle of Wight concert, so I'll take a look for that on Amazon or Deep Discount.

I've seen TKaA, and I may even have a copy of it on VHS (ghaa! ancient tech!). It's great, and has several scenes that were later parodied in Spinal Tap (like Townshend showing off his guitar collection). One thing I remember about that doc is the way Pete dissed the early Beatles music -- "turn the balance control so you only hear the instruments... they really didn't play that well". Come on, man, be a little diplomatic!

I agree with you about other people doing Who material. They're sort of the opposite of Bob Dylan, who (in my opinion) never wrote a song that somebody else couldn't play better than he could. The Who's songs are almost impossible to cover. I'll give one grudging exception: Tina Turner's Acid Queen works pretty well (one bright spot in the otherwise horrible movie version of Tommy.)

ginnie
2008-Jul-17, 08:16 PM
I haven't seen the Isle of Wight concert, so I'll take a look for that on Amazon or Deep Discount.

I've seen TKaA, and I may even have a copy of it on VHS (ghaa! ancient tech!). It's great, and has several scenes that were later parodied in Spinal Tap (like Townshend showing off his guitar collection). One thing I remember about that doc is the way Pete dissed the early Beatles music -- "turn the balance control so you only hear the instruments... they really didn't play that well". Come on, man, be a little diplomatic!

I agree with you about other people doing Who material. They're sort of the opposite of Bob Dylan, who (in my opinion) never wrote a song that somebody else couldn't play better than he could. The Who's songs are almost impossible to cover. I'll give one grudging exception: Tina Turner's Acid Queen works pretty well (one bright spot in the otherwise horrible movie version of Tommy.)
Pete once said that the Beatles wrote rock's first punk rock song - Helter Skelter.
Pete said lots of rude stuff when he was young! :lol:
Leaving aside the Dylan comments ( I love Dylan), what about Bowie's covers of "I Can't Explain" and " Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere" on his Pinups album? I'm not saying they are as good as the originals mind you.
The best artist for covering other people's songs would be early Joe Cocker. He really does good original arrangements ('With A Little Help From My Friends' , 'Feelin' Alright' etc).

sarongsong
2008-Jul-18, 06:45 AM
...the way Pete dissed the early Beatles music...Dylan, who (in my opinion) never wrote a song that somebody else couldn't play better than he could...Bob once, in an interview, said he was looking forward to hearing Elvis' guitar work on an (hypothetical) Presley instrumental album. http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

Donnie B.
2008-Jul-18, 10:32 AM
I'm not familiar with the Bowie covers, and based on my opinion of his other music I doubt I'd care much for them. Personal taste, plus massive overexposure to certain songs of his, pretty much left me with less than zero interest in his music.

In other Who-cover news, though... the very first shot in this strange Week of Who was fired from a very unexpected source. Last weekend I watched part of an MHD concert by Heart (the Wilson sisters' band), and one of the songs they played was Love Reign O'er Me. They did a very nice job of it, too.

And last night's installment was similar -- MHD showed the VH1 Rock Honors show that Parrothead mentioned above. Pearl Jam played two songs from Quadrophenia, including... Love Reign O'er Me. Complete with string section.

Sort of a bookend to the week, eh?

Kiwi
2008-Jul-18, 02:07 PM
Woo Who! It's nice to see a thread about one of my favourite groups. I don't recall whether I took much notice of, or even heard, their first three singles on the radio in 1965, but I was entirely hooked by Substitute in 1966 at the age of 17, and bought quite a lot of their vinyl after that.

I've always thought that as far as the New Zealand public was concerned, The Who were a pretty underrated group. No-one talked about them much, like they did other groups, so I was their only fan I knew for a few years, until a flatmate became so enthusiastic about my LP of Who's Next and thrashed it so often that he bought me a new copy when he left.

Strangely, except for Woodstock, I hardly ever saw The Who in action in movies or on TV for 40 years, until I bought a DVD player.

By the way, if any Apollo fans are reading, between 0:11:50 and 0:12:09 on the DVD Woodstock – Three Days of Peace and Music, there's a clip of the Moon, and if my memory of back then is right, it's when Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins were there. I haven't been able to find anything about it on the internet, but the Moon's phase, angle and elevation is about right for the early evening of 20 July 1969 in the U.S., when the movie's director was apparently out filming in the mountains. I remember when I saw Woodstock in a theatre for the first time, thinking, "Wow, that's cool to see the Moon when the astronauts are there," so there must have been some publicity about it then.

Speaking of Mad Moon, in my opinion Happy Jack has some of the greatest rock drumming ever. Dunno if a musician would agree with me, but I've long said that Keith Moon didn't just beat out amazing rhythms on his drums, he played tunes on them. I've never tired of Happy Jack and would love to find a DVD which does a really good job of showing him playing that number, particularly the last five or ten notes which, I think, he picks out on individually-tuned bongoes, synchronised with the guitars. Any suggestions for a good DVD?

I bought the 2006 edition of the Who's Better, Who's Best DVD which has Happy Jack on it, but you don't see the band in action at all -- they're acting out a safe-robbing pantomime. Grrrr. A few weeks ago I found a DVD called Wild Thing, of 60s groups in black and white doing their hits for British TV, sometimes live and sometimes dubbed. The first track is Happy Jack, recorded live about 1966, and it does a reasonable job of showing Moon for those days when you were lucky to see much more than the lead singer or lead guitarist, but it's not very good by today's standards, and while the camera is on him at the end, it drops down to the bass drums and misses him playing those last notes. Grrrr again, but better than nothing.

I've never seen or heard Live At Leeds, do you think it might suit my needs? What I'd particularly like is a DVD that does a really good job of showing Keith Moon in action, but also a bit of John Entwistle. You can't miss Townshend and Daltrey, but I always remember the first time I saw Entwistle playing, his body and legs almost motionless, standing quietly off to the side, but his long fingers flying and bass guitar roaring spectacularly. He was another who was among the greatest in his field.

My only criticism of The Who is that Pete Townshend was a little too morbid with his lyrics at times, but other than that, a brilliant group. Great to listen to and great to watch. I often marvel at how the three musicians make it look so easy and effortless to do what they're doing.

Just nine days ago I bought the single DVD movie of Tommy for only $7, which I haven't seen since just after the movie was made. Haven't watched it yet, but am keen to see if Ann-Margaret still looks as good sloshing around in the baked beans as she did back when I was that much younger.


I'm not familiar with the Bowie covers, and based on my opinion of his other music I doubt I'd care much for them. Personal taste, plus massive overexposure to certain songs of his, pretty much left me with less than zero interest in his music.

Well, you'd better buy Pinups, or at least listen to it. It's the only LP and CD of his I've ever owned. In the early to mid-70s my best friend was very much into Bowie, but I didn't like him. Too "hard," jangly and jarring, and his music never moved me much. Except for the excellent Pinups. And being a photographer, I always loved the photo of Twiggy and Bowie on the cover.

Donnie B.
2008-Jul-18, 03:18 PM
Kiwi, AFAIK Live at Leeds is an album only, not a video. There was no such thing in those days. There may, of course, be video and/or film of the performance, taken concurrently with the recording of the album. In fact there may have been a snippet of that in the "Amazing Journey" doc, or it might have just been stills; didn't really notice.

Also, thanks for the recommendation, but when I said "less than zero interest" in Bowie's music, I was trying diplomatically to say "active dislike of". I think I'll spend my money elsewhere.

Hmm, Townshend morbid? I never really noticed. Maybe I'm equally morbid? Then again, if you're referring to songs like "Fiddle About" or "Cousin Kevin"... those were written by Entwistle.

Donnie B.
2008-Jul-18, 03:24 PM
Oh, and sorry to burst your happy bubble, Kiwi, but the Woodstock festival occurred in August '69. Nobody was on the Moon then.

Woodstock Music & Art Fair -- Bethel, New York..... August 15, 16, & 17..... 1969

I suppose you could argue that a few of the photons that got burned into the film taken at Woodstock may have bounced off the descent stage, though.

Just for the record, I'll note that Apollo 11 was launched on my 16th birthday :)

crosscountry
2008-Jul-18, 04:28 PM
I'd hear them.

ginnie
2008-Jul-19, 03:36 AM
There are two subjects I can talk about forever, one of them is music, and the other is art!


I've always thought that as far as the New Zealand public was concerned, The Who were a pretty underrated group. No-one talked about them much, like they did other groups, so I was their only fan I knew for a few years, until a flatmate became so enthusiastic about my LP of Who's Next and thrashed it so often that he bought me a new copy when he left.
The Who took off a bit later outside Britain. It really wasn't until Tommy and Woodstock that people really took notice in North America.


Speaking of Mad Moon, in my opinion Happy Jack has some of the greatest rock drumming ever. Dunno if a musician would agree with me, but I've long said that Keith Moon didn't just beat out amazing rhythms on his drums, he played tunes on them. I've never tired of Happy Jack and would love to find a DVD which does a really good job of showing him playing that number, particularly the last five or ten notes which, I think, he picks out on individually-tuned bongoes, synchronised with the guitars. Any suggestions for a good DVD?
Keith Moon was genius. I'm not a drummer, but I am a musician and have played with a few drummers in my time. But, more importantly, like you, we've heard on record many great ones. Keith was a pure natural. Very, very fast, but oh so precise! Timing is everything. He was dynamic.

I
've never seen or heard Live At Leeds, do you think it might suit my needs?
This is a live record, not DVD. Kiwi, if you like the Who, this is definetly the record to get -
I know you like documentation so here is the track listing for the original record:
Side 1:

1. "Young Man Blues" (Mose Allison) – 4:45
2. "Substitute" (Pete Townshend) – 2:05
3. "Summertime Blues" (Jerry Capehart, Eddie Cochran) – 3:22
4. "Shakin' All Over" (Johnny Kidd) – 4:15

Side 2:

1. "My Generation" (Townshend) – 14:27
2. "Magic Bus" (Townshend) – 7:30

I looked on the net and found this, a deluxe set:
Disc one

1. "Heaven and Hell" (John Entwistle) - 5:07
2. "I Can't Explain" (Pete Townshend) - 3:13
3. "Fortune Teller" (Naomi Neville) - 2:35
4. "Tattoo" (Townshend) - 3:42
5. "Young Man Blues" (Mose Allison) - 6:12
6. "Substitute" (Townshend) - 2:07
7. "Happy Jack" (Townshend) - 2:14
8. "I'm a Boy" (Townshend) - 7:47
9. "A Quick One, While He's Away" (Townshend) - 8:52
10. "Summertime Blues" (Eddie Cochran & Jerry Capehart) - 3:22
11. "Shakin' All Over" (Johnny Kidd a.k.a Fred Heath) - 4:35
12. "My Generation" (Townshend) - 15:49
13. "Magic Bus" (Townshend) - 7:56


[edit] Disc two (Tommy)

1. "Overture" (Townshend) - 6:53
2. "It's a Boy" (Townshend) - 0:31
3. "1921" (Townshend) - 2:26
4. "Amazing Journey" (Townshend) - 3:18
5. "Sparks" (Townshend) - 4:23
6. "Eyesight to the Blind" (Sonny Boy Williamson) - 1:58
7. "Christmas" (Townshend) - 3:19
8. "The Acid Queen" (Townshend) - 3:35
9. "Pinball Wizard" (Townshend) - 2:25
10. "Do You Think It's Alright?" (Townshend) - 0:22
11. "Fiddle About" (Entwistle) - 1:13
12. "Tommy, Can You Hear Me?" (Townshend) - 0:55
13. "There's a Doctor" (Townshend) - 0:23
14. "Go to the Mirror" (Townshend) - 3:24
15. "Smash the Mirror" (Townshend) - 1:19
16. "Miracle Cure" (Townshend) - 0:13
17. "Sally Simpson" (Townshend) - 4:01
18. "I'm Free" (Townshend) - 2:39
19. "Tommy's Holiday Camp" (Moon) - 1:00
20. "We're Not Gonna Take It" (Townshend) - 8:48

Wow, my CD only has the six tracks from the record. I'll have to get the deluxe set.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_at_Leeds
Anyway, everyone lets loose on Live at Leeds - very primitive, punkish, with extended jams. No studio constrictions!
Actually, the listing for the deluxe set is almost exactly the same for the Isle of Wight DVD I have.



This What I'd particularly like is a DVD that does a really good job of showing Keith Moon in action, but also a bit of John Entwistle. You can't miss Townshend and Daltrey, but I always remember the first time I saw Entwistle playing, his body and legs almost motionless, standing quietly off to the side, but his long fingers flying and bass guitar roaring spectacularly. He was another who was among the greatest in his field.
I haven't watched the Isle of Wight DVD for some time, but it may be what you want. It was done around the same time as Live at Leeds.


My only criticism of The Who is that Pete Townshend was a little too morbid with his lyrics at times, but other than that, a brilliant group. Great to listen to and great to watch. I often marvel at how the three musicians make it look so easy and effortless to do what they're doing.
Pete also wanted to make you think a bit. The Who is one band that is greater than the sum of their parts. That doesn't happen very often.


Just nine days ago I bought the single DVD movie of Tommy for only $7, which I haven't seen since just after the movie was made. Haven't watched it yet, but am keen to see if Ann-Margaret still looks as good sloshing around in the baked beans as she did back when I was that much younger.

You'll appreciate my candidness if I said I thought the movie was very disappointing and almost unwatchable.


Originally Posted by Donnie B. View Post
I'm not familiar with the Bowie covers, and based on my opinion of his other music I doubt I'd care much for them. Personal taste, plus massive overexposure to certain songs of his, pretty much left me with less than zero interest in his music.
Probably heard "Heroes" and "China Girl" too much! :lol: I bought every Bowie album up until 1988 or so. If you get a chance, listen to the LP's "Space Oddity", "Hunky Dory" or one of my favourites "The Man Who Sold The World". These three albums are distinctly different from anything he did later. "Diamond Dogs" is also great, especially the songs "Sweet Thing" and "Rock'n Roll With Me".


Well, you'd better buy Pinups, or at least listen to it. It's the only LP and CD of his I've ever owned. In the early to mid-70s my best friend was very much into Bowie, but I didn't like him. Too "hard," jangly and jarring, and his music never moved me much. Except for the excellent Pinups. And being a photographer, I always loved the photo of Twiggy and Bowie on the cover.
I love this record. And Kiwi, you will too if you appreciate good drumming. You might have heard of him - Aynsley Dunbar . Bowie plays lots of sax on this album too - primitive, but good. He'd never make it in jazz, but here his playing fits in perfectly.

Happy Jack...
http://video.google.ca/videosearch?q=happy+jack&hl=en&sitesearch=#

"The Acid Queen" - The Who at Isle of Wight...
http://video.google.ca/videosearch?q=happy+jack&hl=en&sitesearch=#q=the%20who%20isle%20of%20wight&hl=en&sitesearch=

More Isle of Wight...
"We're Not Gonna Take It"....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gH7wLeCia0c
"Substitute"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doETiUZOkL4&feature=related
"I'm Free"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5roebfnD-bc

...Kiwi, this doesn't mean you have to go out and buy every Who CD like you did the Beatles!

And finally, the Isle of Wight DVD at amazon...read the reviews to get a sense of this. I'm not the best reviewer, certainly not like Gillianren.
http://www.amazon.com/Live-Isle-Wight-Festival-Special/dp/B000ION7CQ/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1216438874&sr=8-1

ginnie
2008-Jul-19, 03:40 AM
Oh, and sorry to burst your happy bubble, Kiwi, but the Woodstock festival occurred in August '69. Nobody was on the Moon then.
ha ha. Keith was at Woodstock. I'm sure somebody was on him!

Neverfly
2008-Jul-19, 03:47 AM
There are two subjects I can talk about forever, one of them is music, and the other is art!


I think you came close to succeeding...

ginnie
2008-Jul-19, 04:09 AM
I think you came close to succeeding...

:lol:
I should ask Kiwi to post his Apollo DVD transcriptions!

Kiwi
2008-Jul-21, 11:13 AM
...sorry to burst your happy bubble, Kiwi, but the Woodstock festival occurred in August '69. Nobody was on the Moon then.

I don't at all understand why you have written this -- can you please explain? Why do you mention a "happy bubble" as if I haven't a clue what I'm talking about? There is no bubble, so you haven't burst one, and you appear to have made an erroneous assumption and not checked the facts. Your post sounds a little patronising. :naughty: More respect for your elders please, young man! :)

I am well aware of the whereabouts and dates of the Woodstock Festival and that nobody was on the moon at the time, but I didn't say the clip of the moon was filmed then. Please re-read my post (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/76759-why-who.html#post1285243). And if you look at the clip in the movie, note the moon's phase (just before first quarter) and that it is overexposed and in a dark blue sky, and check an astronomy program, you'll find that that moon phase didn't occur at all during the festival, so it couldn't have been filmed then.

The nearest possible date for that phase at Albany, New York State, was the evening of 19 August 1969, according to SkyMap Pro v7. There was rain at Woodstock late in the festival but I don't know if it rained there on the evening of 19 August, nor whether Michael Wadleigh, the film's director, was there that evening.

But more importantly, the same moon phase occurred early in the evening of 20 July 1969, and, when I saw the clip in the movie in late 1969 or early 1970, I thought it was rather cool, so if indeed it was filmed on 20 July 1969, I was somehow aware of it at the time. I can't think of any other reason why I should remember that clip from so long ago.

Wadleigh was apparently filming somewhere in mountains on 20 July (see below). If he filmed the moon that evening, is there any reason, considering its historical value, why he could not or should not have included the clip of it in his movie of Woodstock? I can't think why not.

Edited to add: This link http://www.woodstock69.com/wsrprnt2.htm says:
During July, Wadleigh was out in Wyoming filming a movie about mountain climbing.

I would appreciate you editing your post so that in the meantime anyone who reads no further doesn't get the impression that the moon as seen in Woodstock – Three Days of Peace and Music was not filmed when the Apollo 11 astronauts were there. The moon phase and my memory indicate that it certainly was. I've attempted to prove it one way or the other, but so far failed. If anyone knows how to contact Wadleigh or somebody who knows the situation, perhaps we could find out for certain.

Kiwi
2008-Jul-21, 02:04 PM
There are two subjects I can talk about forever, one of them is music, and the other is art!

And don't I know that. :)


Keith Moon was genius... Very, very fast, but oh so precise! Timing is everything. He was dynamic.

Agreed. Please let me know whatever you think is the best DVD showing him in action, especially on Happy Jack.


The Who is one band that is greater than the sum of their parts. That doesn't happen very often.

Agreed. One rare case of it is everyone on Van the Man's It's Too Late to Stop Now double album. Stunning musicianship and recording, and especially good because it mixes a large audience and a small one. There are things like the rhythm guitarist doing just two quick strums every few bars on one track, somebody blowing through only his saxophone mouthpiece, Van blowing on the mike, and the other stuff that you have to hear to understand how it really works. It needs to be listened to on headphones because you not only hear musos side-to-side, but front-to-back too. Just don't have a heart attack when somebody in the enthusiastic small audience bangs on the table at the end. I've seen a few people who are wearing headphones jump out of their seats when that happens, and I jumped, then gingerly parted the blinds to see who was banging on my window late at night. You've been warned!


You'll appreciate my candidness if I said I thought the movie was very disappointing and almost unwatchable.

Yeah, but in art and music some things are so bad that they're good.


I love this record [David Bowie's Pinups]. And Kiwi, you will too if you appreciate good drumming. You might have heard of him - Aynsley Dunbar. Bowie plays lots of sax on this album too - primitive, but good. He'd never make it in jazz, but here his playing fits in perfectly.

It has just finished playing on my stereo. I specially noticed the drumming during the lead break in Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere. Good stuff. And yes, I've heard of Dunbar. I'm not fussed about a few tracks on Pinups because they are similar to what I knew as typical Bowie and disliked (particularly Diamond Dogs!), but I like Friday on My Mind; Shapes Of Things; Anyway, Anyhow, Anywere; and Where Have All the Good Times Gone; and Van the Man's Here Comes the Night; The Who's I Can't Explain; and The Mersey's Sorrow; are sheer class. Donnie B. doesn't know what he's missing. To me, those tracks are very different to what I knew of Bowie, and you're the first of his fans I've known who has Pinups. I got the impression that some Bowie fans didn't like it for the same reason that I do.

Speaking of drumming, Dave Clark impressed the hell out of me about 1964 when he played just two big drums (tom-toms, I think) during one number when his group was here from the UK.

Perhaps I should have been a drummer. Voice is lousy and fingers are too short and fat, and left little finger too weak to be a good lead guitarist, but I was always okay on rhythm guitar, and cardboard box, coke bottle and knee-slapping, like J.I. Allison. :)


Happy Jack...

Unfortunately, living out in the country and being an invalid near the bottom of the socio-economic heap has a few downsides, one of them being super-slow dialup, so I can't view videos. One day, some day. The driver for my latest Logitech mouse was going to take over 13 hours to download, so I'll give it a miss until I buy a memory stick and ask somebody who has broadband to help.


...Kiwi, this doesn't mean you have to go out and buy every Who CD like you did the Beatles!

True, but I was glad you re-introduced me to the Beatles. I'm enjoying Anthology 3 right now. I must have been in the wrong mood when I tape-recorded all a friend's Beatles' LPs for him in the 90s and decided to not buy their CDs. As a teenager the attraction was the beat, the beat, the beat, and I never really appreciated their musicianship, except for McCartney's bass on Rain. Now I do.


I should ask Kiwi to post his Apollo DVD transcriptions!

The transcriptions, or the indexes, or both? :) They wouldn't fit here. Which reminds me that I still owe you those 1957-58 space race clippings. Or was it something else?

ginnie
2008-Jul-22, 12:07 AM
Kiwi wrote: One rare case of it is everyone on Van the Man's It's Too Late to Stop Now double album.
I'm a bit weak in this area. I love some of his early stuff like Astral Weeks (especially Sister George") - lovely standup bass on that album. I do have 'The Philosopher Stone' which is made up of material that didn't get included on his albums. There is no denying it - this is a fantastic album. Really clean, clear and a bit sparse.


Stunning musicianship and recording,
Ha ha - Van only plays with the very best. You have to know your chops to be on the same stage with him. The Band managed to do this - The Last Waltz.


Yeah, but in art and music some things are so bad that they're good.
...this happens rarely, but does happen. In the case of "Tommy", I disagree. But I should state that I'm not a big fan of musicals. Jesus Christ Superstar is one of the few I can watch, unless Help! and A Hard Days Night is included.


to what I knew as typical Bowie and disliked (particularly Diamond Dogs
I love Diamond Dogs. Maybe because it was the first album I ever bought it is special. But I'd like to think it is because of the songs. To each his own!


you're the first of his fans I've known who has Pinups.
Maybe because I was 15 when it came out? Among my group of friends at the time, there were two Bowie Albums - Pinups and Ziggy Stardust. I started work in '74 when I was 16, and immediately started buying his albums: Diamond Dogs, The Man Who Sold the World, Aladdin Sane, Hunky Dory, Space Oddity, Pinups and of course Ziggy (in that order). I eagerly awaiting each release after that and followed him through his stylistic changes. That is one thing that is important - from 1969 till 1984 his style changes on each album almost - especially his early ones. Thus Heroes sounds so different from Ziggy. Compare Hunky Dory to Low! Bowie ran out of steam around 1988 or so in my opinion. That doesn't mean that he hasn't done anything good since then, it just means he hasn't done anything that I'm really fond of.


Speaking of drumming, Dave Clark impressed the hell out of me about 1964 when he played just two big drums (tom-toms, I think) during one number when his group was here from the UK.
The Dave Clark Five? I wouldn't recognize anything by them now. I did listen to them on the radio in the sixties.


but I was always okay on rhythm guitar
That's fine. It's you're strumming hand anyway that defines your style IMO. As examples, listen to the rhythym styles of Lennon vs. Neil Young vs. Keith Richards vs. Pete Townsend. I can't play lead worth a darn, but I do have a style.


Unfortunately, living out in the country and being an invalid near the bottom of the socio-economic heap has a few downsides, one of them being super-slow dialup, so I can't view videos

I forgot about that. I couldn't live without Broadband. Is it available in your area at all?


I must have been in the wrong mood when I tape-recorded all a friend's Beatles' LPs for him in the 90s and decided to not buy their CDs. As a teenager the attraction was the beat, the beat, the beat, and I never really appreciated their musicianship, except for McCartney's bass on Rain. Now I do.
People often forget, or never even knew, that the Beatles were also excellent musicians. Especially ignored is Ringo Starr. He was one of the most individualistic drummers I've ever heard. I could pick out half the Beatles songs just by listening to the drum track. Among drummers themselves though, he is considered quite good.
George just kept improving his technique with each album. The reason his didn't play the lead on "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is that in the studio at the time nobody was getting along. George's solution was to have Eric Clapton come in and play it and change the chemistry a bit. Everybody like Eric.
Lennon played simply, or he made it look simple, but try playing some of the chords that he did so effortlessly. Watch the Beatles on the rooftop at the end of the Let it Be movie - if you can find it. I don't think it has ever been released on DVD.
And Paul could play everything, as he did on the Band on the Run album except most of the guitar.


Which reminds me that I still owe you those 1957-58 space race clippings. Or was it something else?
You sent me them back in April. Thanks!

I'll watch the Isle of Wight DVD and get back to you. I don't think there is anything else available with Moon (a full concert, that is).

... and Neverfly: It's hard for me to stop on this subject once I get going!

ginnie
2008-Jul-26, 07:08 PM
I'm watching The Who at the Isle of Right now on DVD.
I think anyone who is a Who fan would love this - the Who, arguably at their peak playing at 2:00 a.m. in the morning (when they are awake) before a huge crowd, with no guest singers. Pete starts the concert off shouting "Smile, you buggers!"
This concert was just shortly after Live at Leeds was recorded, to the style and presentation of their music is very similar to that recording. Instead of buying Live at Leeds, Kiwi, I think it would be more worth your while to get this DVD. The bonus would be you get to see the concert as well.
Everybody plays wild this night, loose and aggressive. And unlike todays terrible guitar sound, Pete manages to be very, very loud - but clear.
The Who supplied the sound system for the whole festival - 125,000 watts of power. Although they don't perform Happy Jack, they do justice to their repetoire.

Track Listing:
Heaven and Hell - I Can't Explain - Young Mans Blues - I Don't Even Know Myself - Water - Shakin All Over - Spoonful/Twist and Shout - Summertime Blues - My Generation - Magic Bus -
----Tommy: Overture - It's A Boy - Eyesight to the Blind - Christmas - The Acid Queen - Pinball Wizard - Do You Think Its Alright - Fiddle About - Go to the Mirror - Miracle Cure - I'm Free - Tommy's Holiday Camp - We're Not Gonna Take It

Donnie B.
2008-Jul-27, 12:26 PM
I don't at all understand why you have written this -- can you please explain? Why do you mention a "happy bubble" as if I haven't a clue what I'm talking about? There is no bubble, so you haven't burst one, and you appear to have made an erroneous assumption and not checked the facts. Your post sounds a little patronising. :naughty: More respect for your elders please, young man! :)
Well, first of all, I'll ask you for that respect for your elders. I believe I date you by a couple years at least. Okay, not enough to rate automatic respect, but if anybody's being patronizing... [edit] Agghh... I just reviewed the dates and you are, indeed, a few years my elder. I grovel before you, sir.

Second, sorry for the delay in responding -- I was on vacation and stayed offline entirely for a week. I should probably do that more often.

As to your complaint, I'm not changing or editing my earlier post. I did re-read your original post, and as far as my feeble brain can tell, it's perfectly valid to read it as implying that you thought the festival occurred during the Moon landing. Now that you've clarified that (quite forcefully, I might add), I see no reason for further comment.

Except for this: I don't entirely understand your vehemence about the issue. At worst, I was suggesting you might have gotten a couple dates confused -- dates that differed by a month, forty years ago. Was that so terrible? I'd hate to fall out with a poster I respect very much over such a trivial matter.