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View Full Version : The Cosmic Void: Could we be in the Middle of it?



Fraser
2008-Jul-22, 03:30 AM
On large scales, the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic. This means that no matter where you are located in the cosmos, give or take the occasional nebula or galactic cluster, the night sky will appear approximately the same. Naturally there is some 'clumpiness' in the distribution of the stars and galaxies, but generally the density [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/07/21/the-cosmic-void-could-we-be-in-the-middle-of-it/)

01101001
2008-Jul-22, 03:35 AM
I thought this neighborhood seemed awfully quiet!

trinitree88
2008-Jul-22, 04:01 PM
On large scales, the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic. This means that no matter where you are located in the cosmos, give or take the occasional nebula or galactic cluster, the night sky will appear approximately the same. Naturally there is some 'clumpiness' in the distribution of the stars and galaxies, but generally the density [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/07/21/the-cosmic-void-could-we-be-in-the-middle-of-it/)

Fraser. On large scales, as large as ~..1 Gpc....the data from surveys of polarizations of distant quasars shows the universe not to be homogeneous and in violation of the Copernican Principle. see:http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0507274 The same mechanism contributing to the orientation of polarization vectors in the 355 quasars in question ought to be influencing the orientations of the fireballs of distant type 1a supernovae. We have already seen that galactic magnetic fields contribute to alignments of pulsating Cepheid axes,...see:http://www.astron.nl/documents/conf/science/sci33w.pdf,.. and have little reason to assume that progenitors of type 1a's are immune to them. This implies that the most distant 1a's will be most misaligned, compared to the nearest ones, requiring recalibration of their luminosities for viewing angle, in keeping with the barrel-shaped morphological characteristics of their remnants.
pete

gerald8101
2008-Jul-22, 04:43 PM
On large scales, the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic. This means that no matter where you are located in the cosmos, give or take the occasional nebula or galactic cluster, the night sky will appear approximately the same. Naturally there is some 'clumpiness' in the distribution of the stars and galaxies, but generally the density [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/07/21/the-cosmic-void-could-we-be-in-the-middle-of-it/)

quote=gerald8101 in my opion the cosmic void my be one of these,the center of the universe,Ifeel the universe is shaped like a huge black doughnut,or the void could be an entrance to the other lobe of the universe.when you look at supernove remains there is always a left and right lobe of the exploded star I see no reason why the universe could not be the same way after its explosion.or it could be the begining of the so called big rip.where the universe tears itself apart.or one last thing an area of antimatter.

rigney
2010-May-23, 03:55 AM
The beauty of not knowing is in the estrangement of thinking. Without conflict, life in our world would be little more than 'drab"!!
Homogenic? Our universe is anything but! If we could see other solar systems in our own galaxy; it would probably scare the bejabberes out of our most astute scientists.