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jokergirl
2009-Oct-09, 10:35 AM
Always read the recipe ....twice. Read it slowly and thoroughly. We sometimes miss something IMPORTANT. :)

You forgot the most important part:
"And then, USE YOUR HEAD. There are such things as typos, printing errors and just plain confusion. If your recipe bakes a cake with 20 nutmeg nuts (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,412823,00.html), you should be able to figure something's amiss."

;)

megrfl
2009-Oct-09, 02:15 PM
Hi, As I recall, Graham just beats the eggs and stirs them into the soup
with the fork. It lends a richness to the dish. Basically, he calls this an appetizer. I am trying to aproximate the amount of seasonings you should want. I taste as I go, and so should you. The idea here is to celebrate the mushrooms. If you are going to serve only some of the whole, divide what you will serve and add the egg to that. Next time, heat the rest and do likewise. I think you will find this dish quite tasty, especially with your own fresh croutons.... 3/4 ' pieces do nicely. A little parmesan regiano finishes this wonderfully. The origin of this dish as I was told by Graham, is a restaurant in Rome named "Alfredo's " . The Galoping Gourmet's cookbook,
"The Graham Kerr Cookbook " did not have this recipie, but he may have
another book of which I do not know. I'm sure there may be a correction of sorts, but this is pretty much the recipe I remember from the TV show in 1965. Do let me know if you liked it. Don't over salt.
The colour is slightly redish.... owing to the tomato paste, with the onions and mushrooms showing along with the tiny bits of stirred egg. The reward is in the tasting. This is the first gourmet recipie I learned from Graham Kerr. If you are using extra large eggs, try just the one. Crack it in a bowl first. Hate to spoil a fine soup with a bad egg!!!!!!! Really.
Best regards,
Dan

I will be making this for a Thanksgiving appetizer/soup. It sounds fairly light, so not too filling. I will be preparing it in a cabin in the Smoky Mountains, so my pots/pans will be limited, however, I am taking my crock pot, so that should work for the finished product.

Thanks again, I can't wait to report back to you the results, sometime after November 30th. :)

danscope
2009-Oct-09, 06:00 PM
Heh, that's the exact opposite of my technique. I sometimes skim a recipe for some direction. More fun to just wing it. I'm sure my results are no where near as good, but it's a learning process.

Word for word from a recipe is just reconstruction, not creation! :) (for the record, I don't read instruction manuals that come with that build-it-from-a-box furnature either. Yes, most of the things in my house have a noticable wobble . . . but that's what gives 'em character, right?)
**************
Hi, Yes, I wing it often. But I read half a dozen recipies so as to get some corroboration, agreement on basic technique and seasoning, cooking times etc. And I should tell you that there is a major difference between
cooking .... and baking . You can springboard and get away with much when cooking.
Baking can and often does require paying attention to and following certain principals that have developed over centuries.
So... 2 cups of flour....2 Tbs. of baking powder, 1 tsp salt .... yes, you see this often. And yes... you can use too many eggs. Not good eats.
Once , my sisters were making apple bread pudding. They put in 1/2 cup of baking soda. Totally inedible. Nyet. Yuck. Hoo boy, was that bad.
Reading with clarity is a good thing. :)
Best regards,
Dan

Fazor
2009-Oct-09, 07:06 PM
Yes; so I've heard. I don't bake. I'm not a "sweets" eater anyway. I mean, I bake *chicken*, for instance, but that's not what counts. I would like to start making some of my own breads/pastas for some of the foods I make, and that will require some recipes.

And like Henrik talked about; I do read for technique, flavor profiles, etc. (or, more often, watch cooking shows). But rarely do I go "Hmm. Okay, 2cps this. Now 1 tsp that" . . . mostly because whenever I follow a recipe, it never turns out. I guess I'm better at telling myself what I like than someone else is; go figure. ;)

danscope
2009-Oct-10, 02:37 AM
Hi Fazor, Get a very good "Instant Read Thermometer " and be very watchfull of the temperature of your yeast water. This is mission # ONE !!!!
Do Not Exceed 105 degrees . I use a large insulated coffee mug ,
per-warmed with warm water. I disolve 1 tsp. of honey and 1 tsp. of sugar
into the water and then add the yeast, stirred into the water.
Put on the cover and wait ten minutes. The foaming action of the little yeast beasties should be apparent. If they are not, yeast is dead. Buy fresh yeast.
Start by making pizza first. Left over dough makes a fine calzone or pinch it into a loaf and bake it.
From there, anything is possible.
Dough needs time, a warm bowl oiled and a plastic bag cover in a nice warm place... no cold drafts. This works. :)
This will get you going.
The kitchen aid mixer with the dough hook is one heck of a machine for
making dough. And really has the power to mix cookie dough. Really.
Best of luck,
Dan

Fazor
2009-Oct-10, 02:54 AM
:) Thanks Dan; I'll keep that in mind. My kitchen is too small to do anything (litterally no counterspace if you have a cutting board out), but I've been making a list of things I want for when we get a bigger house and bigger kitchen. I think I'm saving dough / noodles for when I have counters. It sounds quite necessary.

Oh, and I was thinking about this thread. Just hoped that when I say stuff like "I don't use a recipe" I'm not sounding pompus. I garuntee you guys are better cooks, and I certainly don't mean it that way. Just that I love cooking as an exploration / art. Free-form. Paint by whimsy, not by numbers. Etc. That's the part of cooking I love. Well, I really love the eating. But the cooking is a very close second.

Parrothead
2009-Oct-10, 02:09 PM
I'll always follow a recipe, as written (excluding obvious typos) the first time, then just make adjustments, following times. An instant read thermometer can also be a dough thermometer, the optimum temperature for bread doughs is 78-84 F.

jokergirl
2009-Oct-10, 02:20 PM
Oh, and I was thinking about this thread. Just hoped that when I say stuff like "I don't use a recipe" I'm not sounding pompus. I garuntee you guys are better cooks, and I certainly don't mean it that way. Just that I love cooking as an exploration / art. Free-form. Paint by whimsy, not by numbers. Etc. That's the part of cooking I love. Well, I really love the eating. But the cooking is a very close second.

You're not sounding pompous to me.
Personally, I do use a recipe, but I usually do at least some substitutions depending on what I have at hand, the quality of the materials at hand (I use organic flour with a much higher protein content so I need to change the amount of water in most recipes for example), personal taste and just plain old common sense - if something does not look/smell right I will try to fix it, no matter what the recipe says.

I have found that my explorations into break baking go a LOT better if I just follow my own nose than if I meticulously try to follow a recipe. And I don't think I'm a good baker at all - it just happens to be that way anyway.

;)

mahesh
2009-Oct-10, 07:51 PM
...If you are using extra large eggs, try just the one. Crack it in a bowl first. Hate to spoil a fine soup with a bad egg!!!!!!! Really...
Put egg(s) in saucepan/beaker and add cold / tap water. If they do not float, they are fine. If any of them float/suspend, they would be inedible.
If they rise at an angle, but not lift up at all, use them pronto. Another day and they are ex-eggs.

Dan, that Alfredo's Mushrooms, sounds niiice! Thanks.

danscope
2009-Oct-11, 03:22 AM
Hi, You are all welcome!
Thanks for the egg tips...(pun...) :lol::lol:
May the recipes and tips serve you well.

Best regards,
Dan

BigDon
2009-Oct-16, 03:26 AM
Wow. I found a new food I can't eat. That's like three in fifty years. Brussel sprouts, baloot and now a new one, galanga an ingredient in thai cuisine. In a soup called Tom Ka. I could barely give it the proper three bites. Whooo, yuck! I can eat my weight in Pad Thai, mind you.

danscope
2009-Oct-16, 03:53 AM
Just tell them not to put the gallanga. Chicken soup with lime juice, mushrooms, cocnut milk and thaai basil is a good thing. When I see Tom Kar on the menu, I know they have good Thai food.
Bon appetit.
Dan

BigDon
2009-Oct-16, 04:32 AM
Just tell them not to put the gallanga. Chicken soup with lime juice, mushrooms, cocnut milk and thaai basil is a good thing. When I see Tom Kar on the menu, I know they have good Thai food.
Bon appetit.
Dan

Hey Dan, the Thai Stick in Millbrae has both Tom Ka and good Thai food. :) The one in San Francisco is even better. Has even better Pad Thai.

The Marnee Thai, also in San Francisco, is better yet. More :) You can get "Thai Gems" at the Marnee Thai. A very fancy Thai dessert. And I never get a chance to order them! Different conspiracies of fate every time!

And better yet, my friends I go there with are personal friends of the owners so I get treated extra special. Everybody gets treated special by the hosts at Marnee Thai, hence the "Extra" special. I've only been there like five times and the hostess both remembered my first name and noticed I lost a hundred pounds. How can you not like that?

danscope
2009-Oct-16, 04:39 AM
When you work at it, you make friends. Good friends in great places are just majic.
Watch out for the little thai chillies. They can melt steel.
:) Dan

crosscountry
2009-Oct-18, 05:41 AM
I just discovered Romano cheese. Man that stuff can be good.

danscope
2009-Oct-18, 05:54 AM
Try grating a little fresh parmesan regiano and some Romano.
Interesting variation. When I make pizza, I put the parmesan onto the dough first along with some romano, then some sauce, shredded mozzarella and a little cheddar, and then the 'other things' , a little fresh cracked pepper
etc.... The parm on the bottom doesn't get singed, but mingles with the sauce. And the flavour.... well!
Dan

mahesh
2009-Oct-18, 07:12 PM
Wow. I found a new food I can't eat. That's like three in fifty years. Brussel sprouts, baloot and now a new one, galanga an ingredient in thai cuisine. In a soup called Tom Ka. I could barely give it the proper three bites. Whooo, yuck! I can eat my weight in Pad Thai, mind you.
Hey BD!

I couldn't give that stuff three bites either. I don't think one is meant to...buuut, in small doses, it's terrific.

Galanga is rhizomes-cousins with ginger and turmeric, as you know...
I don't know if there were 'large' pieces in your soup.

When finely diced / julienned and cooked, one hardly notices it/them.
For some dishes that need rhizomes - ginger for me - to enhance/surprise,
I normally, give it a thwack with the base of my palm, drop it in, for cooking and remember to retrieve it by the time of serving.
Otherwise, not even three bites and some one might leave the table already...

Having used galanga, only on a few occasions, I can't really say much about it.

Brussel sprouts!:surprised baby baby cabbage...try swishing them in butter over high heat, for a mo...yum!

Baloot/balut...I had to look it up...my gosh...the less said the better.
I couldn't even conceive of such a thing.

danscope
2009-Oct-19, 04:44 AM
Yes, .... if it's got ginger, I'm for it!
I sometimes sneek some ginger in with the onions in some dishes.
Adds a little something to a good soup. It is absolutly wgeat in making your own 'Corned Beef Hash '. And of course the Allspice berries ...ground in the hash. James Beard recipe.

Best regards,

Dan

sarongsong
2009-Nov-11, 05:04 AM
In search of the perfect food! http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon12.gif
November 3, 2009
Ice cream researchers at the University of Missouri, who have been making ice cream tastier for more than a century, are working to make ice cream into a functional food, adding nutrients such as fiber, antioxidants and pro-biotics to premium ice cream...hope to have a prototype ready for tasting in the next six months...
University of Missouri (http://cafnr.missouri.edu/news/stories2009/healthy-ice-cream.php)

danscope
2009-Nov-11, 06:29 AM
Well.... they are welcomed to introduce anti-oxidants. We already do this in the form of fresh fruit... peaches, strawberries, cherries etc.
More fibre than we already enjoy in existing quality ice cream sounds like a
poor direction to take ice cream. We have many many sources for that elsewhere. Put it in the cone, why not? Turn that around,..make it work
for us. And we don't need quite so much air....really. And the downsizing is just introducing resentment bordering on hatred. Beware; cheapness strikes each day. The richness of quality lingers .

Best regards,
Dan

jokergirl
2009-Nov-11, 08:33 AM
I wonder how they want to put in probiotics - won't the cold kill the bacteria?
On the other hand, I LOVE frozen yoghurt with fresh fruit. I'd gladly take more of THAT!

;)

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-11, 09:16 AM
Interesting.
From what I've read, there's no evidence whatsoever that probiotics have any effect1 and excessive anti-oxidants have been linked to cancer.

So, instead of making good ice-cream, they want to make cancer causing, faux green, extra expensive for no benefit, ice-cream substitute.


1) to the point where advertising claiming health benefits from probiotic food is forbidden in Denmark as misleading.

mugaliens
2009-Nov-11, 05:57 PM
There's actually somewhat of a danger in trying to make everything healthy, partially if someone tends to overeat, but particularly if they're already eating healthily and/or are taking a simple vitamin supplement.

For example, too much fiber has, well, side-effects, and omega-3s, taken in excess, have been reported by the FDA to increase the risk for bleeding menorrhagic stroke, and reduced glycemic control among diabetics. The largest risk involves people with certain heart conditions.

And yet we now have omega-3's being added to eggs and other foods.

Personally, as I eat well and take a simply multi-vitamin supplement which rounds out my vit/min requirements, I avoid foods with added vitamins and minerals, such as Total, and especially with added other ingredients. Instead, I stick with fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and cereals, beans and legumes, healthy dairy, low-mecury fish, and lean meats.

Oh - and an occasional double-cheeserburger!

But this morning, I'm eating organic raisen bran with blueberries, rolled oats, and peaches...

danscope
2009-Nov-26, 04:58 PM
Hi, Oh..by the way,
A Happy Thanksgiving to one and all.

We got four kinds of pie and a Boston cream Pie, boiled onions in cream sauce, sweet turnips, spiced sqash, mashed potatoes ala Daniel, Bread stuffing, Pork Pie, Cranberry-orange relish with walnuts and a few other things. Remember the brown-in bag. Got an 18 lb. bird. It'll last two days.
Eat well and prosper!

Dan

danscope
2009-Nov-29, 02:41 AM
Everyone loved the turnips , the gravy and the Boston cream pie.
Today we made Potato Pancakes with left over mashed potatoes.
Just gets better and better.

Dan

SolusLupus
2009-Nov-29, 03:30 AM
I buy the TV dinners.

I eat the TV dinners.

danscope
2009-Nov-29, 05:09 AM
Hey.... TV dinners work. No problem, no foul.
Nothing is compulsory.
Dan

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-29, 05:28 AM
You don't heat them?

danscope
2009-Nov-29, 06:30 AM
Hi Henrick, I cook from scratch most of the time. But...that's me.
It's good to be the cook! :)
Dan

SolusLupus
2009-Nov-29, 07:20 AM
You don't heat them?

Maybe!

Honestly, I'm too lazy to cook. I have a hard time keeping track of time, and I'm not good at keeping things clean. I don't have any kind of a routine, and it's hard just doing small things.

danscope
2009-Nov-29, 07:19 PM
Perhaps you need a crock pot. These things work..... easily. Hmmm....

blueshift
2009-Nov-29, 11:37 PM
I am a foodie and have to be. I am a celiac and watch very carefully what goes into my food so cooking is the safest thing for me to do. I get my fiber from fresh produce and flax seed and flax meal.

However, I think there is a danger in making everyone fit to some healthy diet besides just allergies. It seems to me that the species survived simply because not all diets are the same. When diseases came to town that killed off all thin people then the fat ones kept the species going. When diseases came to kill of the heavy set folks then thinner humans survived, etc.

As far as recipes go I like to use imagination and combine certain techniques used in east India with other cultures. The number of cuisines that do not have curry in east India exceeds the number of days in your life multipied by 3. I have an east Indian friend who has one family member who has gone 63 years without eating the same meal twice. His family likes to spend over $50,000 for the Thanksgiving feast.

I have learned how to "stir/steam" my meals from some of them and I use major grey chutney at times, made from ginger, mango and sugar. Potatoes absorb it quite readily and it gives them a texture that is really neat.

geonuc
2009-Nov-30, 09:29 AM
The number of cuisines that do not have curry in east India exceeds the number of days in your life multipied by 3. I have an east Indian friend who has one family member who has gone 63 years without eating the same meal twice. The first sentence here seems like a gross exaggeration. The second sentence suggests to me that where you wrote 'cuisines', perhaps you meant dishes.

jokergirl
2009-Nov-30, 09:41 AM
Mmm... I just had a string of really nice dinners this weekend when some of my family visited. They were to a mediterranean-inn-general-mideast-in-special tune - think falafel, tsatsiki, couscous and the like.
I'm particularly proud of the salad I made though - rucola and other leafy greens with steamed butternut (since I couldn't find a proper pumpkin that was ripe enough), soft goat cheese and walnuts, on a simple dressing of olive oil and a bit of aged balsamico. Yum!

;)

mahesh
2009-Nov-30, 10:01 AM
Hmmm, nice jg, I'm thinking the other end of this spectrum is delicious as well...when one has a child / (ren), one ends up eating the left-over child-friendly goop, with all those lovely nourishing calories too....and flex ones muscles or not...

oh how sweet that is too.

danscope
2009-Dec-03, 06:14 AM
Hi, A repeat from work I did in another thread.

Hi, Here's my Mum's recipie for French meat Pie ( Tourtiere ) .
This will make a little more stuffing than you need. You can make a small pie
with the scraps. Make a little extra dough . So..........

Tourtiere my Mum and her Mum before her.

In a heavy saucepan ( I like to use a large stirfry wok ...no-stick )
cook 2 pounds of ground pork untill it turns grey, using a fork to separate it.
Drain most of the fat.
Boil up 4 large potatoes, cut small like for homefries untill fork tender.
In a separate pan, saute 2 large onions ...chopped .
Combine meat, potatoes, onions and season with salt, pepper ( 1 tsp salt)
at least that much pepper (fresh ground is better) , 1 tsp sugar,
1/2 tsp of cinnamon, 1/4 tsp of allspice, a dash of Bell's poultry seasoning,
and some ground cloves. 1/2 tsp to 1 tsp, depending on your taste. This is an ancient colonial recipie. Mix up the potatoes, onions and meat , mix the dry spices and sprinkle onto the meat-potatoes mixture evenly.
Now, the crust (pastry). Pre heat oven to 375 degrees .
7 oz of (half shortening,half butter ). Total of 7 oz. It makes a better crust.
2 1/4 cups flour
5 TBS. cold ginger ale . ( try it...you'lllike it )
a dash of salt .
I make this in the kitchenaid mixer with the paddle. This works. Once you have the pastry cut-in, add the COLD Ginger Ale. Divide into two balls,
partially flatten them and wrap in plastic wrap. Chill for half an hour or so.
Get a big pie plate. 10 inch is good, 1 3/4 " deep . Roll out crust, line plate,
load well with meat mixture. Apply the top crust. Cut a couple slits in the top. Bake it at 375 for 30 to 40 minutes untill it has a nice golden brown color.
The inside is already well cooked, so you only need to bake the crust.
This item disappears first at the Christmas parties and whenever it appears
it is a favorite. Supposedly, this filling will make two small pies.
Suit yourself. Enjoy the recipie.

Bon Appetit

Dan

megrfl
2009-Dec-10, 01:49 AM
Dan,
I made your "Mushroom Alfredo soup" over our Thanksgiving holiday. Yum! It was a big hit, I will be making it again Christmas day. :) Thanks and please keep the recipes coming. I may give your above recipe a shot, the idea of preparing an ancient colonial recipe has me intrigued. :)

danscope
2009-Dec-10, 02:41 AM
Hi Meg, I am so proud that you tried it. A little work for a glorious tip of the hat to Graham Kerr. This was a recipe he found in Rome from an restaurant (quite famous) named " Alfredo's " . If you finish it with some nice fresh parsley, it really is quite nice. So happy you enjoyed it.
Good friends, good food and time to enjoy them.
Tomorrow, Quiche Lorraine for lunch with Mum , my Daughter and maybe
rice cereal for Anya who is 6 months and has her two lower front teeth coming in!

Bon appetit ! :)

Dan

Parrothead
2009-Dec-18, 04:12 PM
Have baked a dozen loaves of banana bread and a couple of hundred gingerbread cookies, in the past couple of days. More of the same to be baked today and tomorrow, followed by shortbread cookies and "kringels" (stollen type coffeebread). :D

danscope
2009-Dec-18, 07:01 PM
Baking builds character. And we all value the time and thought which one dedicates to the friends they bake for. There is certainly no comparison
between commercial stuff and "the genuine article" .
Every bite is a memory, and you shall be remembered.

jokergirl
2009-Dec-21, 09:57 AM
Baking builds character, but making candy is pure MAD SCIENCE!

We made traditional Swedish Christmas caramel candy on Saturday. Well, mostly my boyfriend made it. It's delicious, but a dentist's worst nightmare (or maybe a dentist's bank account's day dream?).

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/knack4.jpg

They were really easy to make, too. No fiddling around with oversaturated sugar solutions and playing chicken with caramelisation. Just dump in all the ingredients at the very beginning, boil until they cool down in the desired hardness when dropped in water, mix in nuts and pour.

;)

Tinaa
2009-Dec-21, 02:53 PM
I make Christmas candy every year. My kids favorite is glass candy, wintergreen and cinnamon. I make several batches and it never lasts until the New Year.

danscope
2009-Dec-21, 03:07 PM
Hi Joker Girl, That sounds like special fun once a year. I'll have to try it.
Any specifics for the recipe? :)

Dan

jokergirl
2009-Dec-21, 04:40 PM
The recipe is on my blog, here: http://wererabbits.wordpress.com/2009/12/21/swedish-christmas-candy-knack/

;)

jokergirl
2009-Dec-23, 09:39 PM
Oh, and if tooth-breaking caramel is not your thing, you could always make some chocolate in a jiffy...

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2568/4208805369_071f41753b_o.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2621/4209567640_939a07771a_o.jpg

http://wererabbits.wordpress.com/2009/12/23/christmas-candy-2-ice-chocolate/

;)

Buttercup
2009-Dec-23, 11:25 PM
I've made peanut butter fudge in the past. Always turned out good. The recipe is in any Fanny Farmer Cookbook. There's just something about candy thermometers! :)

danscope
2009-Dec-24, 03:38 AM
Ah yes! A very good tool in season. A kitchen is quite incomplete if it lacks thermometers, and the high temperature candy thermometer is king. :)

Dan

danscope
2009-Dec-25, 05:47 PM
Ah.... I just finished the onions in cream ( a simple white sauce , a little dijon, parmesan, cheddar, pepper, nutmeg ). Unnnn..doggies !
get some possum livers and pickalily crawdads. :)

Parrothead
2010-Mar-13, 04:03 PM
Bananas, bananas, bananas. Neighbours own some food store, every now and then they just bring me a load of over-ripe bananas. A couple of large plastic bags full a week or so ago, which got used for banana bread, banana splits and banana smoothies. Just got a good sized box full last night, so I'll be baking even more banana bread, some banana muffins and banana cream pies. I'll make some banana-strawberry smoothies to wash the goodies down.

Fazor
2010-Mar-13, 08:02 PM
We went to our local mexican joint for lunch. I've spoken about it before, but it's amazing. Particularly for a town not known for it's fine dining (not that this place is fancy; it's the same building as the old 'Long John Silvers'). It's not a town known for it's cultural diversity either (typical idea of diversity is the part of town who bothers to put on shoes to walk to the drive-through to buy their 24 pack of Busch beer, rather than the portion who goes without shoes. Neither half wears a shirt, by the way).

ANYWAY, so this Mexican place is awsome. "Authentic" Mexican. Sure it's been americanized a bit. But the people are form Mexico.

I was about to settle for the Mole Poblano; one of my favorite dishes, but only better than average at this place. Just been a while since I had it. Then I noticed their 'Enchiladas Rancheros'. Enchiladas (2 beef, 2 chicken) with mole poblano, onions, and cheese ontop.

Wow. It was amazing. So now I'm back home, and I'm a very happy and well-fed Fazor. Yum

Parrothead
2010-May-08, 06:20 PM
Finished baking a Devil's Food cake. I'll assemble it later. I'll soak the layers with some Amaretto. Use cherry filling and whipped cream between the layers. Finish the sides and top with whipped cream and rosettes.

Buttercup
2010-May-08, 07:53 PM
Finished baking a Devil's Food cake. I'll assemble it later. I'll soak the layers with some Amaretto. Use cherry filling and whipped cream between the layers. Finish the sides and top with whipped cream and rosettes.

{{feels delightfully dizzy}}

Can I have some?? :D Please? Pretty please? :D

danscope
2010-May-09, 04:11 AM
"Yum! If it's got chocolate, I'm for it!!!! " To quote just about any girl anywhere.....
"Chocolate..... it's a good thing." :)

Tinaa
2010-May-23, 10:00 PM
Bought some kohlrabi at the farmers market yesterday. Any ideas on how to cook it?

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-24, 12:01 AM
Google suggests looking here (http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/kohlrabi/)

jokergirl
2010-May-24, 06:12 AM
I like Kohlrabi best raw, especially with a nice slice of buttered sourdough. Crunchy!

;)

dwnielsen
2010-May-24, 06:45 AM
What is this, the torture thread? I'm powerful hungry.

danscope
2010-May-24, 05:24 PM
" ......You don't have to go hungry. .........you could cook up something delicious and good for you. Those prepared boxes aren't the foods
your looking for. You can go about your business. ....Move along ..... "

jokergirl
2010-May-25, 08:53 AM
Unless the prepared box is a bento made by me.
I have a bento today, but I fear it won't be enough food - just a rice ball from the freezer, pickled chiles and carrots, pickled beansprouts, a hardboiled egg and a piece of baklava.
Ah well, there's always the vending machine if I get hungry.

;)

dwnielsen
2010-May-25, 09:00 AM
I make enchiladas all the time. It's practically the only thing I cook anymore. Sometimes soup from whatever is around. Sometimes Baigain Bharta, but it's more work.

I like frying stuff, especially those tiny samosas you can get in freezer bags at the ethnic stores. Something fun about hearing the sizzle, just makes me feel better inside. :)

For snacks, broccoli sprouts with cheese and ginger-orange dressing on those round sandwich slices they have everywhere now.

jokergirl
2010-May-25, 09:09 AM
What's Baigain Bharta?

Samosas, I really should make some but I'm too lazy. Maybe I'll find some nice frozen ones, then I can use them in bentos.

dwnielsen
2010-May-25, 09:31 AM
Baingan bharta's a mushy eggplant dish. A really good popular So Indian dish with small whole eggplants is bagara baigan (the transliterated spelling on these is variable in practice, if you look them up). That's the next to try...

jokergirl
2010-May-25, 10:00 AM
Recipe, please!

dwnielsen
2010-May-25, 11:28 AM
Okay, jokergirl, I'm still working on mine, but here's the basic idea - you can base it on what you get on hand:

A couple big eggplants (what we'd call "normal" ones)
cumin (a few pinches)
mustard seeds (a few pinches)
turmeric (a couple/few pinches)
garam masala (a few pinches)
corriander (a few pinches)
chopped cilantro
minced ginger
crushed garlic
a couple diced green chilies (the little ones; to taste)
a couple diced onions
a diced tomato or 2

This comes in 2 parts

1) COOK THE EGGPLANT
You can grill it if you have a flame stovetop or you can do it in the oven
Oven:
Poke some holes in the eggplant (I think you can stuff some garlic in there for taste)
Rub oil (the quality doesn't matter) all over the eggplant
Cook for almost an hour at ca. 375
It should turn dark and crispy on the outside, then it's ready
The inside will be pretty mushy
Scoop out the inside
You can save it or move straight onto part 2

2) COOK THE DISH
I don't know if this is the best way, but this is fairly traditional, I think:
I use a coffee grinder to fresh-grind the spices, but you don't have to, of course.
Toast cumin seeds with some butter or ghee (clarified butter)
You can grind the cumin or use the whole seeds
Grind other spices, except the mustard seeds
Begin to heat oil in pan to medium high (depends on stove somewhat)
Add cumin and mustard seeds (seeds may begin to pop, careful, if so move on quickly)
Stir
Add ginger, chilies, and garlic
Stir
Add turmeric
Add garam masala
Add onions
Stir (everything will become yellow-tinged)
When onions are beginning to turn translucent or brown,
Add tomato
Stir
Add eggplant
Stir
(You can add some yogurt or what you like)
Add corriander
salt/pepper to taste
Stir
Add cilantro
Stir

This is basically a generic recipe for cooking lots of Indian dishes, with a different main ingredient, of course, but like I say, it may not be the best way.
The secret to this dish is getting the eggplant to taste really roasted.
Also, the dish is generally not very wet or dry.

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-25, 01:26 PM
corriander (a few pinches)
chopped cilantro
I though cilantro is coriander.

jokergirl
2010-May-25, 02:34 PM
Cilantro usually denotes the leaves, coriander the seeds - or was it the other way round? :doh:
Either way, it's a distinction only made across the pond.

geonuc
2010-May-25, 04:09 PM
Cilantro usually denotes the leaves, coriander the seeds - or was it the other way round? :doh:
Either way, it's a distinction only made across the pond.

You were right the first time.

Buttercup
2010-May-25, 04:39 PM
The lady at this web site (http://www.thefoodpornographer.com) sometimes prepares bento meals for herself and significant other. Very cool! I'd not heard of bento before reading at her web site.

Swift
2010-May-26, 01:44 AM
Unless the prepared box is a bento made by me.
I have a bento today, but I fear it won't be enough food - just a rice ball from the freezer, pickled chiles and carrots, pickled beansprouts, a hardboiled egg and a piece of baklava.
Ah well, there's always the vending machine if I get hungry.

;)
Baklava?!?:eh:

Don't get me wrong, I love Japanese-Greek fusion cuisine. :D

jokergirl
2010-May-27, 01:11 PM
Korean-Greek actually - the beansprouts were pickled kimchi style. :D

I put any which stuff into my boxes - whatever falls out of my fridge!

;)

dwnielsen
2010-May-29, 05:13 AM
Yumm, did you do the pickling yourself?

jokergirl
2010-May-29, 07:48 AM
Yup - not hard at all. I also pickled the chiles and carrots myself, but those are more traditional pickles.

danscope
2010-May-31, 06:22 PM
Ah...... simple pleasures . RHODE ISLAND ICED COFFEE
One drink shaker ..... check .
one tall, cold glass , mate for drink shaker . Check.
Three ice cubes ...check.
This morning's left over coffee .... check.
two tablespoons of Autocrat coffee syrup ......check
a little half and half ...check .
All ingredients added to shaker , fit glass to shaker, shake vigorously. :)
Introduce contents to tall , cold glass. Consider cookies etc.
Ah ... yes . It must be summer in New England .

Swift
2010-May-31, 08:38 PM
I do miss coffee syrup from Rhode Island. I've never seen it anywhere other than New York and RI. I used to love coffee milk - like chocolate milk, but using coffee syrup. And Portuguese Sweet Bread. Yum. OK, now I'm hungry.

danscope
2010-May-31, 09:09 PM
Hi, You can make something like it. Take two parts water and one part sugar and bring to a strong simmer and stir gently untill clear.
So, use 2 cups water and one cup sugar.
Then.... take a cup of good coffee ( fresh and hot ) and add 1/4 cup of good instant coffee to that . Stir in gently. Add a teaspoon of good vanilla and a half teaspoon of salt ( helps to preserve it but refrigerate anyway) . Combine the coffee mixture and simple syrup . Store in a
suitable bottle and label " Coffee Syrup " . It makes a good iced coffee or a fine coffee milk . And even a " Coffee Cabinet " (Frappe).
You can play with the amounts ...depending on how strong you like it. It is difficult but not impossible to abuse vanilla or instant coffee. :)
Best regards,
Dan
PS: The advantage of the syrup is that it readily mixes with the drink.... as opposed to using just sugar which never really melts into
the iced coffee. Sits on the bottom .

Swift
2010-Jun-01, 02:20 AM
And even a " Coffee Cabinet " (Frappe).
If nothing else, my years in RI (1980-85) taught me what a cabinet is :D. I had a cartoon years ago that showed a waiter holding a tray with a tiny meat grinder and a tiny metal cabinet and he's saying "Believe or not, some guy from Rhode Island ordered a grinder and a cabinet".

danscope
2010-Jun-01, 03:24 AM
LOL !!! Don Bousquet strikes again. A local hero, he has been penning Rhode Island cartoons for many years. Like " Beware of the Quahog" ,
a picture of a little house by the sea with a small (looks like a doghouse) house and a length of 3 inch hawser (large rope) going down into the salt water with a few bubbles comming up and a circus stake driven well into the ground.
Incidently: the "Coffee Cabinet" originated when the electric drink mixer from Hamilton-Beach , back in the late 1800's became all the rage.
Best thing since sliced bread. And besides making excellent bar drinks, it was superb at mixing up an icecream shake or 'frappe' in french.
Now, these machines were hard to come by and expensive$$$$$$$ . It seems that people were Stealing these mixers.
So, in dim view of this pilfering of equipment, the mixer was actually locked up in a small "cabinet" to curb stolen mixers, and carefully kept under lock and key. Apparently, this practice was so wide spread that the drink yielded from this mixer came to be known as a "Cabinet" ,
coffee being the most popular flavor . To this day, even the fast food franchises feature coffee shakes along with vanilla and chocolate
.... in Rhode Island. No coffee shakes? Sales would plummet.
I am lucky enough to have and enjoy an art deco Hamilton-Beach drink mixer, light green and chrome. Works well with hot chocolate too!.

Drink well and prosper.
Dan

crosscountry
2010-Jun-01, 05:27 AM
today I smoked a 9lb brisket for about as many hours. it turned out quite well. Some parts were drier than others, but overall the flavor was quite good, and the brisket satisfied many people.

Also included was a gallon of baked beans (from cans - I will make them next time) grilled corn on the cob, and plenty of deserts brought by my guests.

Dinner was good, and I really look forward to leftovers tomorrow.

Swift
2010-Jun-01, 03:45 PM
LOL !!! Don Bousquet strikes again.
That's the guy's name. I couldn't remember or find a google search that gave me it.


today I smoked a 9lb brisket for about as many hours. it turned out quite well. Some parts were drier than others, but overall the flavor was quite good, and the brisket satisfied many people.

Smoked brisket - yum. That does good.

danscope
2010-Jun-02, 04:30 AM
Hi, Tonight I tried to reproduce the delicacy of a famous restaurant in RI. Fried... marinated smelts , Portugese style.
After much thought and tasting , I came up with this.
For two people.

one pound of smelts (fresh are wonderful, frozen work quite well , and what I used).
veg oil for frying ....NOT canola . I used crisco.
AP flour seasoned w/ salt and pepper
juice of a lemon

Half an onion chopped extrafine
2 tbs butter
3 TBS olive oil
1 tsp sugar
1/4 c vinegar
1/2 cup white wine (I used a Reiseling ) .
salt and pepper
a little lemon juice ( left over from dipping the smelts)
oregano
basil
dill weed
dash of celery salt
1/3 cup of italian tomato sauce (classico )

Prep: wash smelts ( heads removed and cleaned )
dry on paper towels.
Dip in lemon juice ( I use an inverted butter dish . this works )
and then dredge in seasoned flour

Fry 6 to 8 at a time in a large cast iron pan with 1/4 inch of veg oil ( I may experiment with light olive oil and butter ...Niece style)
375 f one minute each side ..... smelts turn golden

I prepared the marinade earlier in a stir fry wok : sautee onion with oilive oil and butter, season w/ salt and pepper. Preheat wok and then easy on the heat. Medium should do.
Add jar sauce , basil, oregano , vinegar and sugar. stir . Scrape sides ( no burning ). medium heat should be fine.
Once bubbling, add wine and some dill weed. Add a dash of celery salt and maybe a pinch of red pepper flakes (easy does it) .
Thin sauce as desired with more wine.
Now, as smelts are done, place them in the sauce on low heat. Second batch should follow soon.
My wife and I agreed that we had duplicated some very famous smelts . Pretty easy recipe.
We made some steamed clams for an appetiser. Smelts with red potatoes and green beans for main course. A nice crusty baggette enjoy. Maple Walnut ice cream
for desert . Rhode Island on a plate. :)
If you try this and like it, let me know.
Fresh is good. Not easy to find smelts very far inland. Delicacies are like that.

Cook well and prosper,
Dan

danscope
2010-Jun-19, 05:36 AM
Ah..... more dinner delights.... Celine's Fried Eggplant Encasserole

We seem to like this recipe. Get two good sized eggplant. Cut your eggplant after you peel it , into 1/4 " slices. Some people lightly salt them and lay them out on paper towels. ( we are all cutting down on salt,....so easy does it, right!!!! ). This removes some bitterness. Let em set for half hour. Lightly rinse the salt and pat them dry on paper towel.

Set out some medium sized bowls, one for seasoned flour , and one for beaten eggs. One for italian breadcrumb .Depending on how much eggplant you are doing, use three to four eggs, beaten with a little celery salt, pepper, and a dash of oregano. Season the flour likewise.
Now, you need a large cast iron frying pan. It keeps the heat well averaged ( even ) . I like to keep a platter warm in the oven ( counter top
works fine... 240 degrees ) . I use OLIVE OIL,see. Not anything else. And I NEVER use canola. NEVER.
Now, you don't need tons of it. 1/8 " is more than enough. You can add just a little unsalted butter . I preheat the pan with medium heat.
If you have the luxury of a HEAVY duty no-stick 12" skillet, this will work. Plastic spatula, right.
Dip the eggplant slice in the flour, then egg , then breadcrumbs and lay into frying pan. They will probably cook with 3 minutes on a side.
You are looking for a nice golden color. Not brown. Then flip carefuly. The second side will cook faster. It's already hot. Have a warm plate to put them on. You can serve them like that with some Italian tomato sauce ( gravy round these parts) .
Next level.......
Take a 4 " deep casserole dish, ovenproof , and layer some tomato sauce ( classico...bertoli ) on the bottom, then sprinkle some grated parmesan, and then fried eggplant . Spread some sauce, (add some fresh basil ? yum) , some shreaded mozzerela or a mix of mozzerella and cheddar, more eggplant, grated parmesan, sauce, mozzerella, eggplant. Basically, you are making an eggplant lasagna. You can add a little fresh oregano sprinkled on to the second layer of sauce. A little fresh cracked pepper .... a little.
Finish with sauce and a little mozzerella. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 25 minutes , just to warm through.
Serve with fresh roasted chicken with green beans . Fresh baked french bread . A little merlot from a box ? A little salad, perhaps?
Tiramisu for dessert or..... pears poached in red wine, sugar and cloves w/cinnamon, chilled overnight w/ some french vanilla ice cream.
This makes a good dinner. Remember not to use too much heat frying. You need some, but control it. The larger the pan, the more
heat it will take. Don't leave a pan empty. When you develope your technique, the eggplant will absorb the least amount of oil and cook nicely.
It is sometimes even better tomorrow, but warm it up slowly. High heat is seldom your friend.

Best regards,
Dan

Parrothead
2010-Jul-17, 06:42 PM
Made some red currant syrup, a couple of weeks ago. It went well with ice cream or just adding to pops like: coke, ginger ale, tonic water. Was nice with vodka and tonics, too! :D

Will be baking plenty of Frangipan and Fern tarts, this week.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Jul-17, 06:49 PM
Made some red currant syrup, a couple of weeks ago. It went well with ice cream or just adding to pops like: coke, ginger ale, tonic water. Was nice with vodka and tonics, too! :D

Will be baking plenty of Frangipan and Fern tarts, this week.
Ooooh, recipe please, I just picked a baggie full of red currants from my bush.

Parrothead
2010-Jul-17, 07:09 PM
Ooooh, recipe please, I just picked a baggie full of red currants from my bush.

Here is the recipe I used: http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Currant%20syrup

I made a batch about one third the size. Used 500g red currants, a couple of hundred grams each of raspberries and cherries. Measured the fluid, did the math for the sugar needed, once simmered and cooled, ended up with approx. 600 ml syrup (filled most of a 750ml bottle).

danscope
2010-Jul-20, 02:55 AM
Ah..... Summer time luxuries. Take a third of a ripe musk mellon ( cantalope ) , hog out the seeds in the center, and depending on just how hungry you are , invest that cavity with Coffee Ice Cream ( a local traditional favorite ) or I suppose an excellent sorbet would be refreshing.
I have a local place which features a Passion Fruit Sorbet . Quite nice. I might try a really good Orange Sherbet or sorbet.
Good luck finding a really descent mellon . It helps to beat the heat.
Bon Appetit,
Dan

danscope
2010-Aug-13, 09:11 PM
Hi, My cardiologist suggests Oatmeal is good food. Little does she know I already have mastered the dish. Oatmeal, the good way, goes like this: Peel two apples , slicer divides them, into sauce pan with a little butter, dash of salt, some brown sugar and a tablespoon of orange juice. Dash of cinnamon and nutmeg. Medium heat, glass cover. Keep an eye on this, stir occasionally.
Boil water for two servings of oatmeal (never instant). It takes just as long to make the good one.
Add a handfull of raisins to water. Bring to boil. Add oatmeal . Stir. Dash of salt . Cover and simmer 5 minutes, stir occasionally.
When done, add sauteed apples plus 1/2 cup walnuts, slightly chopped.Serve warm with a taste of light cream or half n half(1 TBS.)
This is a far cry from plain porridge. Really . And it will help to lower your cholesterol and it is extraordinarily good for your system.
This works.
Best regards,
Dan

Tinaa
2010-Aug-22, 12:01 AM
I've bought a couple of lbs of cayenne peppers at the farmers' market. Now what am I gonna do with all of them?

Buttercup
2010-Nov-05, 05:05 PM
A few days ago on The Food Network, sweet potato ice cream was featured. :D It was made on the show, and a can of pureed sweet potatoes was used. I've never seen sweet potatoes sold in "pumpkin pack" form. Anyhow, it turned out a gorgeous light brown color and they poured hot caramel over! Wow. I'd love to try that. We have an electric ice cream maker; I might give it a whirl. Should be able to find recipe online.

danscope
2010-Nov-05, 05:31 PM
Sounds pretty good. I might even dig out my old icream freezer. Let us know how it cam out.

Dan

Swift
2010-Nov-05, 05:40 PM
Uhhhhhhh, sweet potatoe ice cream <drool>. That sounds good. I love sweet potatoe pie.

geonuc
2010-Nov-06, 10:12 AM
Pumpkin ice cream is pretty fabulous, too.

Buttercup
2010-Nov-06, 01:14 PM
The Blue Owl Restaurant & Bakery (http://www.theblueowl.com/menu.php)

OMG. Came across this web site by happy accident. If I'm ever in the vicinity...what a place!

Buttercup
2010-Nov-11, 11:48 AM
http://www.pauladeen.com/beta2010_recipes/recipe_view/hot_curried_fruit/

Saw this on Paula Deen's show yesterday afternoon: Hot Curried Fruit. I'm going to make that as one of our Thanksgiving side dishes. I was delighted; love fruit, it's pretty and I've been wanting "excuses" to experiment with curry without meat.

Fazor
2010-Nov-11, 01:03 PM
Must be one of her healthier dishes; only one stick of butter.

Strange
2010-Nov-11, 01:17 PM
This is a far cry from plain porridge.

I have always found American "oatmeal" rather bland. It is much nicer if you make porridge with milk (even without all the tasty extras).

Buttercup
2010-Nov-11, 01:20 PM
Must be one of her healthier dishes; only one stick of butter.

Yeah. :(

The other day she and a lady friend were making homemade brownies and something else; I think all combined was 3-1/2 cups of butter. :eek: Ina Garten is also bad for lots of butter/fat. I'm like "Ever heard of yogurt or apple sauce, ladies?"

Giada is my hero. Even if I'd like to strangle her for being so naturally thin and enjoying good (and healthy) food in ways I never could. ;-p She has well rounded out meals, imo.

Swift
2010-Nov-11, 02:11 PM
Yeah. :(

The other day she and a lady friend were making homemade brownies and something else; I think all combined was 3-1/2 cups of butter. :eek: Ina Garten is also bad for lots of butter/fat. I'm like "Ever heard of yogurt or apple sauce, ladies?"

Giada is my hero. Even if I'd like to strangle her for being so naturally thin and enjoying good (and healthy) food in ways I never could. ;-p She has well rounded out meals, imo.
Yes on Paula Dean and yes on Ina Garten; I'm not a big fan of either. Neither my wife nor I particularly like Paula Dean's recipes. My wife has made a couple of Ina's, but they are definitely on the high fat side.

We both love Giada. We have three of her cookbooks and have had a very high success rate with them (success = we've tried the recipe and liked it) and some of her's are among our favorites. You can definitely pick from both healther and less health recipes and generally they are also well written recipes (easy to follow and execute).

A couple of years ago, after one of her books came out, my wife went to a book signing at a local Williams-Sonoma. She said that she is even more gorgeous in person, if that's possible.

Fazor
2010-Nov-11, 02:26 PM
A couple of years ago, after one of her books came out, my wife went to a book signing at a local Williams-Sonoma. She said that she is even more gorgeous in person, if that's possible.

I was going to say that her pronunciation of certain words bugs me, but she's fun to watch (and to look at ;)) I like Paula Dean a lot; but I couldn't make her food without some substitutions. We buy the smallest size container of butter available, and usually end up having to throw it out before it's all gone. It's not necessarily a conscience health-choice; I just don't use a lot of butter. But as such, and with health in mind, I'm not going to start using it either.

I'm happy sauteeing in a little EVOO. Occasionally I'll put butter into a sauce to make it richer; but not often.

For what it's worth; I'm the same way with salt. And that's the one that they're constantly criticizing cooks for on the competiton shows -- not using enough salt. They'd hate my food.

danscope
2010-Nov-11, 05:35 PM
Hi Strange, I sometimes make it with some milk as well . Better oatmeal. But I love it with the apples and walnuts . Good stuff .
Best regards,
Dan

danscope
2010-Nov-11, 05:45 PM
Hi Fazor, here's a tip: You can simply freeze butter. Take out one stick at a time . Also, there is just as many calories in butter as there are
in any substitue spread or articial compound , only the body doesn't know what to do with the artificial stuff.
And most of the time you can back off of the amount you need, occasionaly adding moisture ( like apple sauce ) .
Also..... I wouldn't put canola into my body for $50,000 . No sir.
Best regards,
Dan

Fazor
2010-Nov-11, 06:12 PM
Well, when I say "butter", it's margarine spread. And it's only used for . . . toast, really. I'm trying to think of anything else I use it for. When I make pasta from scratch (pierogi, usually) I'll use real butter. But I haven't made that since last thanksgiving.

Buttercup
2010-Nov-11, 06:25 PM
I love butter, and a favorite snack of mine is a bit of butter (preferably chilled) on a Ritz Garden (Vegetable) Cracker. Or just a plain saltine. Loooove the butter and salt savoriness. Melts on the tongue; yum.

Buttercup
2010-Nov-23, 04:24 PM
For the first time in 17 years of marriage I'm not cooking Thanksgiving Dinner this year. And I couldn't be *happier.* Will miss awakening to the familiar scents of "the night before" preparations, but that's it. Friends have invited us to their home. I'm taking a big pan of baked cornbread dressing (will add pecans and finely chopped apple to it), and a cucumber-tomato salad.

Otherwise our hosts are providing a big hearty meal. They're good cooks and I really look forward to it. :)

What are your plans for the day, fellow Americans? :D

geonuc
2010-Nov-23, 10:20 PM
Not doing much. I have a guinea hen at home, but I'm not sure what I'll do with it. Probably cook it. :)

The spouse claims she's going to make ratatouille.

Swift
2010-Nov-23, 10:32 PM
We are having a small scale one this year, just me, the wife, and her mom. The division of labor and the menu is pretty usual: I'm making the turkey, the stuffing, and the gravy, my wife is making a salad, a sweet potato casserole with peaches and pecans, and the assorted side dishes, and my mother-in-law is bringing a green bean casserole and a pie.

Fazor
2010-Nov-24, 01:19 AM
We're going up to Canton to see Tara's side(s) of the family. Stopping to spend some time with her mom, then off to her dad's for dinner. I'm looking forward to seeing them all, but not looking forward to driving all over the place all day and being away from home.

As for food, the only thing we're making is the pumpkin-cheesecake. Which I won't be eating on account of my diet. But it's a good cake.

PetersCreek
2010-Nov-24, 01:32 AM
As per tradition of the last few Thanksgiving holidays, we're having the couple who own my wife's shop over for the big dinner. Also per tradition, we'll be cooking an amount of food that seems insane for a party of 4...but then, we like leftovers. I'm in charge of brining and roasting the turkey, and I'll prepare a few other dishes: turkey gravy, brussels sprouts sauteed with bacon, green beans with pearl onions, and bourbon peach cobbler. I'm also responsible for the cheese and meat tray (they're joining us early in the day) and for wine selection.

Tinaa
2010-Nov-24, 11:21 AM
My daughter is cooking her first Thanksgiving meal in her new home. It will be an adventure. The meals she usually cooks all seem to involve hamburger helper.

Swift
2010-Nov-24, 02:27 PM
My daughter is cooking her first Thanksgiving meal in her new home. It will be an adventure. The meals she usually cooks all seem to involve hamburger helper.
That made me smile. We all learn by doing. I wish her the best of luck, and you too Tinaa, if you are having dinner at her house. :D

Fazor
2010-Nov-24, 02:46 PM
The meals she usually cooks all seem to involve hamburger helper.

I hope someone's warned her about the giblets! :)

Swift
2010-Nov-24, 02:51 PM
I hope someone's warned her about the giblets! :)
:lol:
One of the first times I cooked a turkey I found a bag of roasted giblets inside when we carved it up. Like I said, we learn by doing.

Buttercup
2010-Nov-24, 02:56 PM
Swift: a sweet potato casserole with peaches and pecans

And PetersCreek mentions a bourbon peach cobbler. Mmmm! :) Love peaches, and that all sounds fabulous. Sometimes I put bits of crushed pineapple or mandarin orange segments in my sweet potatoes (small chunks); and always with pecans and marshmallows on top. :D Although Sunday evening I tasted a whipped sweet potato casserole which had a pecan-praline crust. It was very delicious, and generally I don't like mashed or whipped sweet potato. Unfortunately it was a big potluck setting and I never found out who made it (recipe).


Swiftto Tinaa: That made me smile. We all learn by doing. I wish her the best of luck...

Yes, reminds me of my niece (by marriage) last Thanksgiving. She asked me quite seriously how I learned to cook, as if a bit mystified and in awe. And then I recalled being her age - lol!

Fazor
2010-Nov-24, 02:58 PM
:lol:
One of the first times I cooked a turkey I found a bag of roasted giblets inside when we carved it up. Like I said, we learn by doing.
I've never cooked a turkey, but a policyholder was telling me about the first time she cooked a turkey. And she did the same thing.

She said the smell tipped her mother off, and halfway through cooking it they retrieved the bag, upped the temperature of the oven a bit to try to kill off any contamination from the under-cooked ofal, and made sure no one else ever found out about it. AKA the Julia Child method of dish recovery. :)

Swift
2010-Nov-24, 03:15 PM
Yes, reminds me of my niece (by marriage) last Thanksgiving. She asked me quite seriously how I learned to cook, as if a bit mystified and in awe. And then I recalled being her age - lol!
Most of my initial cooking skills I learned from cooking with my mom, then later with friends and my wife, or just experimenting on my own.

Two lessons I've learned:
- the first was from cooking in college with my friend Robin: all cooking arguments ultimately boil down to "well, that's not how my mom did it!" :D
- second, my wife and I can cook in the same kitchen, and even work on the same meal, but we work on different dishes - it saves a lot of arguments; 20 years later, we are still cooking together. :D

PetersCreek
2010-Nov-24, 04:21 PM
The Wife is making a sweet potato puree with bananas. It's the only sweet potato dish I've ever found palatable.

Buttercup
2010-Nov-24, 04:37 PM
The Wife is making a sweet potato puree with bananas. It's the only sweet potato dish I've ever found palatable.

Seems people either like sweet potatoes or don't. :) I've just recently seen ripe banana mixed in with mashed sweet potatoes (Rachael Ray). She spread that over a turkey-based "shepherd's pie."

I prefer chunks of those soft canned "yams" ... and always with at least brown sugar & cinnamon sprinkled over, pecans, and marshmallows on top. I could eat an entire 8 x 8 inch pan of that! :p But that's waaaay to many carbs so I limit myself.

Swift
2010-Nov-24, 05:34 PM
Seems people either like sweet potatoes or don't. :)
I hadn't thought of sweet potatoes that way, but you might be right. There are definitely foods that people either love or hate, for which there is no middle ground; anchovies seem to be one of those.

Tinaa
2010-Nov-25, 12:56 PM
That made me smile. We all learn by doing. I wish her the best of luck, and you too Tinaa, if you are having dinner at her house. :D

We are eating there. Both my girls always were around to help during meal prep for big family meals so I tried teaching them how to cook. I just hope we don't end up with bread stuffing and not cornbread dressing. (Her future mother-in-law is visiting and they are from Lake Tahoe and may want to make the dressing.)

The child reminds me of me. She has to do it all on her own and learn the hard way.

She asked me to bring pumpkin bread. My younger daughter made it last night. I am feeling kind of lost with nothing to do.

crosscountry
2010-Nov-25, 01:41 PM
Lots of food today. Happy Thanksgiving.

Buttercup
2010-Nov-26, 01:34 PM
I bought my husband a Thanksgiving card which says "To my sweet potato on Thanksgiving" (cartoon sweet potato with line & dots smiling face, and a heart floating above it). Inside reads "I yam so thankful you're mine." :lol:

Tinaa
2010-Nov-26, 01:37 PM
Daughter did an excellent job!

Buttercup
2010-Nov-26, 02:06 PM
Daughter did an excellent job!

That's good to know. :) I'm sure she was very pleased too. Recall those days...

crosscountry
2010-Nov-26, 11:06 PM
My mom cooked a turkey for the first time in my life, and I'll be 30 in January. Every Thanksgiving I can remember except one was in Dallas with my grandmother. She moved to PA this year, and I stayed in Austin with my mom and brother. Dinner was good, although the turkey was cooked a little high for a little long :D

Trebuchet
2010-Nov-27, 01:40 AM
I'm just finishing up turkey, dressing (it's not stuffing unless it's cooked in the turkey, IMHO, and the food safety people don't recommend that), yams, mashed spuds, gravy, green beans, etc. For the second time. It's almost better the next time around.

Atlas shrugged
2010-Nov-27, 03:40 AM
I made a improv lasagna tonite that I used cottage cheese with a couple eggs and Parmesan and then I added some flour to give it some stiffness like ricotta would have. I also had to use rigatoni which are like mostaccioli and then layered it , It worked better than I could have imagined it , and it really satisfied that crave.

Atlas shrugged
2010-Nov-27, 03:45 AM
I made an improv lasagna with cottage cheese and eggs and flour as a substitute for ricotta cheese and mostaccioli noodles and it worked wonderfully.

Parrothead
2010-Nov-27, 04:17 PM
:lol:
One of the first times I cooked a turkey I found a bag of roasted giblets inside when we carved it up. Like I said, we learn by doing.

I made that mistake twice, before learning to really dig around in the cavity to find the bag. :lol:

Buttercup
2010-Nov-27, 04:33 PM
I'm just finishing up turkey, dressing (it's not stuffing unless it's cooked in the turkey, IMHO, and the food safety people don't recommend that), yams, mashed spuds, gravy, green beans, etc. For the second time. It's almost better the next time around.

Isn't that the truth? ;)

The folks with whom we dined gave us hearty portions of leftovers. I made sweet potatoes with pecans and marshmallows last evening, and heated up the leftover cornbread dressing I'd made and taken to their dinner party. My my my...! :D

I should have made some deviled eggs to go with, last night. :confused: I missed those this Thanksgiving. Oh well - for Christmas then. :)

danscope
2010-Nov-28, 01:17 AM
Hi, Just got my computer back .
We did a 20 pound turkey .... with the brown-in bag. Fool proof ! Perfect turkey and delicious .
The secret with the sweet potatoes is to par boil them first. Then we put them in aluminum foil .
Onions in cream sauce , sweet turnips , spiced squash , green bean casserole , mashed potatoes w/ a little grated onion , and
the cranberry orange relish .
In a sauce pan ,bring 1 pound of fresh , cleaned cranberries , 1 cup sugar, and prepare two large navel oranges ( grate the zest with the 1/4 " hole cheese grater ,avoiding the white pith, and then slice off the white pith, discard, and fine chop the oranges , and place into the pan,
along with 1 cup orange juice and 3/4 cup water. BRING all of this to just a boil, and then simmer for 10 minutes.
Watch it carefully as it approaches the boil so that it doesn't boil over . ( Rocket Science ) .
Once it is done, remove from heat and add a cup of rough chopped walnuts. This keeps for a couple weeks. It is amazingly good.
My Grandmother's recipe.
Happy Thanksgiving,

Dan

Buttercup
2010-Dec-14, 08:07 PM
I like Paula Deen's personality (a lot)...but she's rapidly turning me off to her show with the nonstop sugar and/or butter overload. Yesterday's segment featured a deep-fried ham [ :sick: ] served with "loaded" mashed potatoes (probably containing 1/2 stick butter AND sour cream AND grated cheese AND bacon bits -- I didn't watch to find out), deep-fried asparagus [ :( ]...and a sugary dessert.

And recently she made homemade mint brownies. Two sticks of butter for that alone. And then she tops it off with a big dollop of whipped cream. :doh: :hand: Gosh...whipped cream TOO?

And in a segment prior to the mint brownies, she made a brownie trifle with a galpal; the thing was so heavy (they layered it like mad) it took both of them to carry/lift to the presenting table. :(

There's enjoying food, and then there's begging for a full-blown coronary and trip to the emergency room.

Fazor
2010-Dec-14, 08:12 PM
I agree Buttercup; I really like Paula Deen; and I actually enjoy watching her on her show; but none of her recipes appeal to me. It's hard keeping my daily calorie intake where I want it, but I don't see how it would even be remotely possible eating a stick or two . . . or three . . . of butter every meal.

Swift
2010-Dec-14, 08:56 PM
I'm not a particular fan of Paula Deen; I'm sure she is a nice enough person, but I don't like her recipes. Coronary on a plate. As I said earlier in the thread, I have the same problem with Ina Garten.

danscope
2010-Dec-14, 08:57 PM
Now the trick is following the directions and " adjusting " the recipies . When you can do this , you are really cooking .
The Galloping Gourmet did this with a lot of his original recipies, putting the accent on flavour while beating down the calories a bit.
And remember: good butter has just as many calories as margarine or some other crud.
Happy cooking ,

Dan

rommel543
2010-Dec-14, 09:06 PM
My initial introduction into cooking was through my parents. Both of them cooked so I got training from both of them. I worked for a short time in a kitchen as a prep-cook as well, getting all the food read ahead of time for cooking (portioning, pre-cooking ribs, making sauces, etc). From there most of my experience has been from recipes, and trial and error.

As for the giblets, thats the first thing my mother taught me when making a chicken or turkey. In fact years later I was making a roast chicken on my own I was shocked when I found that the little baggie was not there. I thought the butcher forgot to put it in. It wasn't until later I found out that only certain grades of poultry include the giblets.

Tinaa
2010-Dec-15, 01:16 AM
I'm not a particular fan of Paula Deen; I'm sure she is a nice enough person, but I don't like her recipes. Coronary on a plate. As I said earlier in the thread, I have the same problem with Ina Garten.

I don't like Paula much. Come on, I know I'm from the South and I know we don't say y'all or use other colloquialisms like she does. She really irritates me, y'all.

danscope
2010-Dec-15, 02:54 AM
We love her because she is friendly and comfortable in the kitchen and in front of the camera , and respect her and her background.
Everybody has an accent . Not everyone can teach. She can teach, and she always gives you everything you need to know about what she is doing . This is the key.
Once you have the fundamentals, you can springboard , with a little courage, and make those recipies your own .
Now, baking takes some experience. And you may have to try that experiment a few times before you get it right. Yes, it means time and money. For myself, I compare recipies , sometimes five or ten recipies to see what these people are doing. This builds confidence.
If you aren't that comfortable with tweeking recipies, judge from the ingredients just how hefty that recipie is. Not a bad way to find a good recipie that fits your calorie profile.
Sometimes , the " Hotel Slice " of a delicious recipie is better than the double portion of the bland and poor cousin of the original.

Bon appetit
Dan

geonuc
2010-Dec-15, 10:00 AM
I don't like Paula much. Come on, I know I'm from the South and I know we don't say y'all or use other colloquialisms like she does. She really irritates me, y'all.

Texas is not 'the south'. It's its own region. :)
I've lived in Texas and in the south (Georgia).

I'm with Swift. Paula Dean is nice but no thanks.

Buttercup
2010-Dec-15, 12:19 PM
I don't like Paula much. Come on, I know I'm from the South and I know we don't say y'all or use other colloquialisms like she does. She really irritates me, y'all.

:confused: Is that a recent development? I'm asking seriously. Because I have relatives (cousins primarily) all over NE Texas and they have used "y'all" extensively in the past. It was standard to hear people in stores and all around saying "y'all" constantly, during visits. Been 17 years since I've been in that area, but I (native Iowan) sure got strange looks for saying "you guys" -- and even corrected; "It's Y'ALL, not you guys." :rolleyes:

And now for a question: Since when did baking become "cooking"? I hear a lot of people refer to baking a cake as "cooking the cake (in the oven)." Huh?? :confused:

Cooking: What's prepared in a skillet, pot or pan above a flame.

Baking: When you put it in an enclosed oven and turn on the heat.

Right? Cakes aren't cooked -- they're baked.

Swift
2010-Dec-15, 02:09 PM
Baking is one of the many processes of "cooking", but I would never say "cooking the cake".

SeanF
2010-Dec-15, 02:58 PM
The real question, then, is why they're called "cookies" and not "bakies."

Buttercup
2010-Dec-15, 04:23 PM
The real question, then, is why they're called "cookies" and not "bakies."

The word "cookie" is derived directly from a Dutch word (which I can't recall offhand). It means "little oven" in that language IIRC.

PetersCreek
2010-Dec-15, 07:15 PM
And now for a question: Since when did baking become "cooking"? I hear a lot of people refer to baking a cake as "cooking the cake (in the oven)." Huh?? :confused:

Cooking: What's prepared in a skillet, pot or pan above a flame.

Baking: When you put it in an enclosed oven and turn on the heat.

Right? Cakes aren't cooked -- they're baked.

Things you can do in an oven besides baking:

Roasting
Pan roasting
Braising
Stewing
Broiling

It's all cookin' sug.

Buttercup
2010-Dec-15, 07:20 PM
Things you can do in an oven besides baking:

Roasting
Pan roasting
Braising
Stewing
Broiling

It's all cookin' sug.

Well (reluctant) I see your point.

But it's still mighty odd to my ear to hear a professional TV chef say "Put the cake into the oven and cook it on 350 F for 40 minutes..."

To me, something which contains rising elements (baking powder, or yeast - in the case of bread) isn't cooked. It's baked.

Bread, cakes, cookies, souffles, pies are baked. ::shrugs:: ;)

Swift
2010-Dec-15, 07:24 PM
Things you can do in an oven besides baking:

Roasting
Pan roasting
Braising
Stewing
Broiling

It's all cookin' sug.
Among other uses for the oven, there is also pot storage and house heating when the furnace isn't working. ;)

PetersCreek
2010-Dec-15, 07:33 PM
To me, something which contains rising elements (baking powder, or yeast - in the case of bread) isn't cooked. It's baked.

Bread, cakes, cookies, souffles, pies are baked. ::shrugs:: ;)

I was nodding my head in full agreement...right up until pizza popped into my head. We'll just call that a special case because to me, "baking pizza" sounds every bit as dd as "cooking a cake" does.

BigDon
2010-Dec-16, 07:25 AM
Hey Mr Creek, I'll accept your moderator call on this one.

How would you rule on somebody shooting somebody else in the foot "accidently" with a .22 (short) for ordering the bleepity bleeping "stinky tofu" while tagging along to your favorite Asian restaurant you only get to go to once a month, if you're lucky? Would that be a dastardly deed? Or is there something like an eight minute rule?

It is completely without hyperbole that I state that I honestly thought the mature waitress serving us had some sort of colostomy bag failure when she brought his dish over to the table. I wouldn't let him talk until he finished and the moment he did I picked up his plate and set in on the empty table to my right. The wait staff was very attentitive and whisked it away promptly. I seemed to have been glaring at my dining companion rather fiercely the whole time he was eating. (I had passed on the appetizers as I had a full order of Pad Thai coming. Took me twenty minutes and two glasses of ice water before I could eat.)

Buttercup
2010-Dec-22, 08:44 PM
I'm going to buy some organic (range free) ground bison. Managed to eat 1/4 pound of it (grilled burger) this past summer with zero unpleasant side effects (unlike regular beef). It's expensive (by US standards) at nearly $10.00 per pound, but will be worth it. I'm having a terrible hankering for spaghetti & meatballs, my chili stew (a "hybrid" concoction but I love it) and a good old-fashioned meatloaf sandwich. It's been a long time since I've enjoyed any of those dishes. Hopefully my 2nd try of this ground bison will be as agreeable as previously.

geonuc
2010-Dec-22, 10:13 PM
Do you have unpleasant side effects when you eat grass-fed beef?

Buttercup
2010-Dec-22, 10:25 PM
Do you have unpleasant side effects when you eat grass-fed beef?

Yes. :(

Otherwise I can handle a bit of roast chicken (like once a month), so long as it's only roasted with a drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper. In fact, I plan to make a roast chicken & vegetable pie for Christmas Dinner, but I'll have mostly veggies in gravy & crust on my plate.

Otherwise it's the expensive buffalo meat. And I'm not sure how much of that I can eat either; won't push my luck, but am seriously craving the dishes I mentioned before.

Wish I could get my hands on some good corn-fed beef from Iowa. That's the best (as regular cow meat goes), but we're far removed from the Midwest and there's no corn-fed beef around here.

geonuc
2010-Dec-23, 11:15 AM
Have you tried the grocery store? If the beef is not advertised as 'grass-fed', then it is corn-fed, which means the cow is fattened up in pens on a corn diet for the last few weeks or month of its life. Most beef sold in the US is corn-fed, I'm pretty sure.

Buttercup
2010-Dec-23, 11:37 AM
Have you tried the grocery store? If the beef is not advertised as 'grass-fed', then it is corn-fed, which means the cow is fattened up in pens on a corn diet for the last few weeks or month of its life. Most beef sold in the US is corn-fed, I'm pretty sure.

The local meat is grass fed. Or rather...stubbly desert underbrush stuff fed. :( What's obtainable around here and in extreme south Texas (near Kingsville; lived there 20 years ago) is pathetic compared to corn-fed beef. I can taste the difference instantly. Corn-fed beef is very rich in flavor. This stuff around here? Sad sad "imitation."

Bought a pound of organic range free bison last evening. Used 1/2 of it in a large batch of my "chili stew." Yumm!!! I'd have some for breakfast this a.m., but not sure my tummy can handle all the spices this early (cumin and curry mainly), lol.

danscope
2010-Dec-24, 01:02 AM
Hi Buttercup, I should enjoy your recipe for Bison Chilli . Occasionally I can get it around here. Great stuff , and reasonably lean.
Details will be very much appreciated .
Best regards always,
Dan

Buttercup
2010-Dec-24, 01:39 AM
Hi Buttercup, I should enjoy your recipe for Bison Chilli . Occasionally I can get it around here. Great stuff , and reasonably lean.
Details will be very much appreciated .
Best regards always,
Dan

Hi Dan: Recipe to follow tomorrow. :) I'm almost offline for the evening (have just now seen this).

Got our Christmas cake in the oven. It's chocolate. Will top with cream cheese frosting, and holiday colored sugar.

danscope
2010-Dec-24, 04:12 AM
Sounds like a winner ! Remember: Chocolate , One of the five main food groups ! :)

Dan

Buttercup
2010-Dec-24, 01:32 PM
Danscope, my chili stew recipe:

1 pound organic free range bison meat
1 can diced petite tomatoes (including fluid)
1 can Bush's chili beans OR Ranch Style beans (including fluid)
1/2 can drained kernel corn
1 can drained baby carrots
2 cans drained whole potatoes, diced (usually I cook the potatoes myself, but sometimes opt for canned)
1/3 cup picante (Pace or Herdez)

***

Brown the meat in a drizzle of olive oil. Season with 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin; 1/2 teaspoon curry powder; 1 teaspoon powdered onion; 1 teaspoon black pepper; 3 or 4 dashes of salt. Add more seasonings if desired. No need to drain the meat; it is very lean.

Stir in canned ingredients.

Stir in 1/2 cup milk.

Stir in 2 or 3 slices American or Velveeta cheese until melted/blended.

Simmer for a while if desired.

Serve with Ritz crackers. :D Sometimes I serve with small slices of jalapeno-jack cheese atop the crackers.

Might seem a strange concoction to some folks, but I could eat 3 bowls of it at one setting! Though I don't :shifty: (weight control).

danscope
2010-Dec-24, 02:52 PM
Hi, And thank you for the recipe. A great chilli recipe builds character !

Best regards,
Dan

geonuc
2010-Dec-24, 03:13 PM
Herdez salsa rocks!

danscope
2010-Dec-24, 04:59 PM
I'll have to import the Hersez picante salsa . Details are important.

Dan

Buttercup
2011-Feb-11, 09:05 PM
I'm going to make a pineapple upside-down cake this afternoon. :) Will use standard brown sugar & melted butter topping, with chopped pecans and butterscotch chips sprinkled in. Of course will also include pineapple rings and maraschino cherries. I chose a regular "Yellow" cake mix; unfortunately the store didn't have "French Vanilla" on hand. :( I adore the scent of a freshly baked pineapple upside-down cake. Bought whipped cream to go with. :D

danscope
2011-Feb-12, 02:48 AM
Pineapple upside-down cake; one of the five main food groups . :) To be enjoyed with friends .

Swift
2011-Feb-12, 02:51 AM
I love pineapple upside-down cake. Can I come over for piece? I'll bring the coffee/tea/milk/rum!

Buttercup
2011-Feb-12, 11:54 AM
I love pineapple upside-down cake. Can I come over for piece? I'll bring the coffee/tea/milk/rum!

Sure Swift; be glad to have you. :) It turned out beautifully. And it's always fun to (carefully) flip it over onto a baking sheet. Lovely caramelization over the pineapple rings & cherries, the cake is soft and tender with just-right crusting of the brown sugar/butter.

Yes danscope: One of the 5 main food groups for sure. :D

BigDon
2011-Feb-12, 09:29 PM
I love pineapple upside-down cake. Can I come over for piece? I'll bring the coffee/tea/milk/rum!

I think coffee/tea/milk/rum is quite delicious in the winter. I didn't know many others drank it.

Pineapple upside down cake. My mother made them often. Also one of the few desserts cats like.

Buttercup
2011-Feb-18, 02:20 PM
Yesterday I was craving a cool and crunchy cole slaw, so I went to the store. The freshest pre-shredded cabbage was the "angel hair" variety; very finely shredded as the name suggests. But it didn't include bits of carrot. :confused: I added shredded carrots, mixed up a light mayo-based dressing with a touch of sugar, folded in a can of (drained) Mandarin orange segments & whole almonds. :D It was very delicious. I actually wanted slivered almonds instead of whole, but it's a small grocery store; only whole almonds for sale. :confused: Husband liked it too.

danscope
2011-Feb-18, 09:08 PM
There is much in the way of nutriton and flavour in a well made cole slaw. Fresh is king. Always. :)

Dan

geonuc
2011-Feb-19, 10:52 AM
Yesterday I was craving a cool and crunchy cole slaw, so I went to the store. The freshest pre-shredded cabbage was the "angel hair" variety; very finely shredded as the name suggests. But it didn't include bits of carrot. :confused: I added shredded carrots, mixed up a light mayo-based dressing with a touch of sugar, folded in a can of (drained) Mandarin orange segments & whole almonds. :D It was very delicious. I actually wanted slivered almonds instead of whole, but it's a small grocery store; only whole almonds for sale. :confused: Husband liked it too.

Ever had peanuts in cole slaw? There's a restaurant in Baton Rouge that does it that way and it's fabulous. Of course, the base slaw has to be good to start with.

Buttercup
2011-Feb-19, 11:35 AM
Ever had peanuts in cole slaw? There's a restaurant in Baton Rouge that does it that way and it's fabulous. Of course, the base slaw has to be good to start with.

No, but I can imagine peanuts would be excellent in cole slaw. :) Actually I nearly did buy a bag of Spanish peanuts instead of the whole almonds, to save a bit of $.

Oh, and Little Debbie Marshmallow Treats are *good.* They're just right crisp-to-soft, marshmallowy and with a hint of vanilla flavor; bought a box while picking up the cole slaw fixings. I always make homemade Rice Krispie Treats, but wasn't in the mood to stir up a batch. Ironically, Kellogg's RK Treats (packaged) are NOT good imo. I was reluctant to pick up pre-made Treats, but figured I'd give Little Debbie brand a try -- yum! :) Glad I did. Generally I'm not a picky eater, but when it comes to sweets I can be.

Swift
2011-Feb-19, 04:18 PM
Ever had peanuts in cole slaw? There's a restaurant in Baton Rouge that does it that way and it's fabulous. Of course, the base slaw has to be good to start with.
I haven't but it sounds good. My wife puts peanuts in her tuna salad and I really like it.

Buttercup
2011-Feb-19, 08:54 PM
Currently snacking on a favorite: Vanilla yogurt on bottom, a hearty handful of Cracklin' Oat Bran cereal over yogurt, and fresh sliced juicy strawberries on top. With a sprinkle of cinnamon over all. :D One bowl might not be enough!

Buttercup
2011-Mar-02, 06:52 PM
Yesterday we joined with family in an after-funeral luncheon. One of my husband's aunts made red chile (to go with homemade pinto beans, shredded beef and chicken, etc.). It was pistol-hot chile, a very delicious form of mild torture. I had probably 1/3 cup poured over beans (with a cold crisp salad on the side). Sopped up the chile with chunks of a hearty bread (served in lieu of tortillas, which are difficult to keep warm AND soft for a crowd). Had to "cool the flames" with 2 cans of icy cold Diet Coke. ;) Haven't had such hot chile in quite a while. Really hit the spot, and I wanted to take some home for this morning's breakfast but it wouldn't have been polite to ask.

danscope
2011-Mar-03, 02:58 AM
Hi, Sorry for your loss . I think family recipes are one of the enduring things which live on with us as a happy remembrance of those who have gone on. My Aunt Lucy's date nut bars are a treasure , and universally enjoyed by us as we remember the wonderful , nurturing woman that she was . I think she sits on my shoulder when I cook sometimes.
Best regards,
Dan

Parrothead
2011-Mar-08, 07:50 PM
Baked some Shrove rolls. Cardamon rolls, hollowed out, drop of strawberry jam deposited at the bottom of the roll, fill in with some of the dough that was hollowed out, bit of whipped cream added, put the lid back on the roll, dust with icing sugar. Yum!

Swift
2011-Mar-08, 08:33 PM
A work friend who is Polish brought in some homemade Pączki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C4%85czki) for Fat Tuesday. The one I ate had a cherry filling and was yummy.

Fazor
2011-Mar-08, 09:39 PM
I've been seeing that everywhere lately. In stores. On TV. I think even in a song or possibly commercial on the radio. I just assumed it was officially Paczki month.

Buttercup
2011-Mar-09, 05:36 PM
Week before last I bought a small wedge of French (aged 2+ months) cheese for $13.50. A semi-soft cheese with a ribbon of blue marbling through it. Looked/smelled good.

Tastes like nothing. :(

There was no way to sample before purchase, unfortunately. So now I'm wary of buying expensive imported cheese (occasionally).

Fazor
2011-Mar-09, 05:45 PM
I know that fear, Buttercup. I'm adventurous with my cheeses, but I've bought many that go uneaten. It's a lot like wine.

At the store last night, there was a nice half-lb (or so?) wedge of Irish Cheddar aged with, more importantly, Irish whiskey. But it was $15 for the small piece.

They also had these huge half-wheels of imported Parmesan (I think? didn't look that close) cheese. We were joking and I said "Lets get that, it's only $150." Tara asked if I was serious, to which I replied that I just made that amount up. We walked over to check it. $130. Man, so close! (um, no. we didn't buy it ;))

Swift
2011-Mar-09, 06:04 PM
I saw this on the Daily Show the other day. It probably should go in some sort of stupid-human-tricks thread, but I thought the foodies would like it.

Del Monte banana packages (http://www.11alive.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=181532&catid=186)

Where nature has provided a single serve, already wrapped banana, Del Monte says they can go one better -- with plastic-wrapped single bananas for sale.

The plastic wrapper is transparent, and according to Del Monte, includes what they call "controlled ripening technology," which allows bananas to remain ripe for an additional six days on the shelf.

You have to check out the photo in the article. Yes, they are actually wrapping a single banana in a plastic package. :eh:

Fazor
2011-Mar-09, 06:13 PM
Adding extra waste at the increased manufacture cost of about 1%, for the low low price of an increased consumer cost of 50%! (okay, so those numbers are made up.)

NEOWatcher
2011-Mar-09, 06:26 PM
You have to check out the photo in the article. Yes, they are actually wrapping a single banana in a plastic package. :eh:
I was expecting a shrink wrapped banana like you see with seedless cucumbers. It's not even that. (I wonder if waxing them like a normal cucumber would be the same)

What's even more shocking to me was this...

Ironically, according to a Del Monte official quoted on London's Daily Mail, the packaging is intended to be a green alternative.
Green alternative to what?

I can see the advantage of protecting the fruit from contamination (although a banana peel isn't normally eaten), but they don't even mention that aspect of it.

Fazor
2011-Mar-09, 06:38 PM
Reducing spoilage would be "green", I suppose.

Swift
2011-Mar-09, 06:41 PM
Green alternative to what?
They were going to originally package them in baby seal skins? :D

Buttercup
2011-Mar-09, 06:47 PM
...and here I thought singly wrapped prunes were the height of ridiculousness. :p

danscope
2011-Mar-09, 08:03 PM
I don't see an advantage in wrapping a bananna . The ethylene oxide they give off tends to make them ripen faster. This is why we put green banannas in a paper bag..... to ripen faster. I don't know, Tim.
" We don't pretend to have achieved perfection, but we have a sytem and it works." Klaatu

Fazor
2011-Mar-09, 08:12 PM
That's why they say it's a special plastic. They have material that can let that stuff out, but not let, to be scientific, "the outside stuff in". There's these "green bags" or something that they've been doing this with for years.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Mar-09, 10:44 PM
There was no way to sample before purchase, unfortunately. So now I'm wary of buying expensive imported cheese (occasionally).
Alton Brown, in an episode on cheese, said that if you can't sample, don't buy your cheese there, find another cheese monger.

Buttercup
2011-Mar-26, 06:58 PM
A friend of ours has been cooking in the kitchen with my husband, making red chile. Charlie has worked as a cook in many local restaurants, and that chile is delicious!! :D I just had a piece of white bread and cheese (what I had immediately on-hand) dipped 3 times into that hot deliciousness! It is just right in spiciness and seasonings. I could eat a generous quantity of that right now, over huevos rancheros.

Whew! My lips and tongue are still a bit afire, in that best way possible. Yee-haw! :)

PetersCreek
2011-Mar-26, 08:24 PM
I just stuffed seven pounds of summer sausage and tucked it in a body-heat-warm oven to incubate overnight.

danscope
2011-Apr-07, 12:55 AM
Well that sounds like a well worth project !

And now.... to celibrate the demise of a certain television carreer, I'm going to bake a cake ! :)

ORANGE PISTACIO BUNDT CAKE
--------------------------------------

1 PKG YELLOW CAKE MIX

4 EGGS

1 CUP ORANGE JUICE

1/3 CUP COOKING OIL

1 PKG INSTANT PISTACIO PUDDING

LATER..... 1/3 HERSHEY'S CHOCOLATE SYRUP

bLEND INGREDIETS AT LOW SPEED 1 MINUTE, THEN HIGH SPEED 2 MINUTES
FOR KITCHENAID MIXER SPEEED 6 .

POUR HALF OF BATTER INTO A CRISCO-GREASED AND FLOURED BUNDT PAN.

THEN.... ADD 1/3 CUP CHOCOLATE SYRUP TO REMAINING BATTER, MIX TILL
BLENDED , THEN ADD TO BUNDT PAN . TAKE A PLASTIC SPOON AND DO A LITTLE
SWIRL THROUGH BOTH BATTERS FOR PATTERN.

BAKE AT 350 FOR ONE HOUR . COOL IN PAN 10 TO 15 MINUTES.
TURN OUT ON WIRE RACK TO COMPLETE COOLING .
TOP WITH GLAZE . 3/4 CUP POWDERED SUGAR PLUS 1 1/2 TBS MILK , STIR .
1/4 CUP COCOA OPTIONAL .

This recipe came with the pan. If you use a silicone pan, the baking time may vary . Check it with a long bamboo skewer.
Simple and good are a winning recipe .

Best regards,
Dan

danscope
2011-Apr-08, 03:59 AM
If you want to kick the flavour up a notch, take the zest off of an orange with a fine zester. That's where the flavour is. :)

Dan

Buttercup
2011-Apr-08, 07:43 PM
Well that sounds like a well worth project !

And now.... to celibrate the demise of a certain television carreer, I'm going to bake a cake ! :)

ORANGE PISTACIO BUNDT CAKE


...I have just died of bliss merely THINKING of it!!

Thanks for sharing the recipe!

I'm still eating Clif Builder bars for protein, but also now like Zone brand Raisin & Almond. :) The former has 20 grams of protein per; the other has 15 grams.

danscope
2011-Apr-09, 03:39 AM
Hi Buttercup, You've got it. This one came with the pan. It helps if your stove is level. Works great and it's really simple.
Less calories owing to no frosting. I'm tempted to throw some pecans into the batter. :)
Hugs and best regards,
Dan

Buttercup
2011-Jul-16, 03:37 PM
Found this recipe just now:

Brownies with Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Frosting (http://http://rachaelsfavoriterecipes.blogspot.com/2009/04/brownies-with-cookie-dough-frosting.html)

Wowza. Too bad I'm allergic to chocolate!!! :cry:

But thought I'd share it for others who aren't.

Parrothead
2011-Jul-16, 03:58 PM
Fresh baked banana bread. Yum. Plenty of flavour already, but kicked it up a notch by brushing some banana liqueur into the finished product.

Fazor
2011-Jul-16, 05:22 PM
Found this recipe just now:

Brownies with Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Frosting (http://http://rachaelsfavoriterecipes.blogspot.com/2009/04/brownies-with-cookie-dough-frosting.html)

Wowza. Too bad I'm allergic to chocolate!!! :cry:

But thought I'd share it for others who aren't.

. . . are you trying to kill me?!

I'm not a big sweets eater. Tonight my parents are grilling peaches and having those with ice cream. I stopped to get some cottage cheese for mine, because that's the kind of food I'd rather have. (Yeah, you read that right; I'm not real big on ice cream.)

But cookies and brownies are my weakness. And Tara will occasionally insist that we get cookies or brownies, which annoys me because I have absolutely zero willpower to avoid them if we have them. So she'll make a batch and eat one or two, and I end up eating the rest!

Brownies AND chocolate chip cookie dough? Yikes. That's like, double kryptonite.

Buttercup
2011-Jul-16, 05:29 PM
. . . are you trying to kill me?!

I know the feeling! But at least you can eat/enjoy this treat. ;)


I'm not a big sweets eater.

I've trained myself not to be. Otherwise I've almost gone into sugar coma a couple of times, when younger. :lol:


Tonight my parents are grilling peaches and having those with ice cream. I stopped to get some cottage cheese for mine,

I love cottage cheese, and would opt for that over ice cream with peaches.


Brownies AND chocolate chip cookie dough? Yikes. That's like, double kryptonite.

Bring on the double kryptonite! :D

Buttercup
2011-Aug-15, 06:17 PM
I've been craving a summer-time dessert. Usually it's strawberry shortcake (made from Bisquick), but I'd rather have a lemon pie. :) Don't like lemon meringue pie however; and lemon-based pies in local restaurants are expensive.

So I purchased a Nilla Wafer pie crust. Will whip/blend softened cream cheese with sour cream. Over that will spoon a thin layer of lemon pie filling. Atop that will be powdered lemon pudding blended into Cool Whip. :D

Should be refreshing. Can't wait. Currently letting the cream cheese soften at room temperature.

I might also swirl a bit of blackberry jam into the pie filling; will decide on that when I'm putting the pie together.

danscope
2011-Aug-15, 06:29 PM
Key Lime Pie is one of my favourites. ( I lived in Key West for 3 years ) . Made with more lemon than anything else.
It's good though.

Dan

Fazor
2011-Aug-15, 07:16 PM
I don't tend to be a fan of lemon or key lime pies, but mostly because I dislike the lack of texture in most cream-based pies. Lemon flavored cheesecake style pie might be nice, though. Particularly with the blackberry jam (I love berry and lemon mixtures.)

Buttercup
2011-Aug-15, 09:00 PM
Lemon flavored cheesecake style pie might be nice, though. Particularly with the blackberry jam (I love berry and lemon mixtures.)

I tried a bit of the cream cheese/sour cream, lemon pie filling, and blackberry jam together on a spoon -- see how it'd taste before marbling in the jam. It tasted VERY good; entirely complementary. Swirled in just enough blackberry to give it a noticeable "kick," and meanwhile the tang of lemon is still predominant. Just as I'd hoped it would turn out.

Half of one pie is already gone. :shifty: :D

Was considering giving the other pie to some friends. But we're going to be selfish. :p

p.s.: I've never had Key Lime Pie. It's been on a couple of restaurant menus, but my curiosity is never strong enough to order it instead of something else (usually peach or coconut cream pie).

Swift
2011-Aug-15, 09:14 PM
I had lunch at Red Robin (a family style burger chain in at least parts of the US) the other day and I had a raspberry lemonade that was excellent. Years ago Baker's Square (a family style restaurant that specialized in pies) had a raspberry key lime pie that was great.

I've always thought berries and lemon/lime make a good combination.

Buttercup
2011-Aug-15, 10:57 PM
Years ago Baker's Square (a family style restaurant that specialized in pies) had a raspberry key lime pie that was great.

Ate at a Baker's Square in Des Moines, Iowa around 20 years ago. Good pies!

PetersCreek
2011-Aug-16, 02:27 AM
You lost me with the mention of raspberries...but my wife likes them and she enjoys Simply Lemonade with Raspberry.

I made another summer dessert from my recently purchased recipe book: homemade Salted Caramel Ice Cream. Not quite as sinful as The Darkest Chocolate Ice Cream in the World but very good nonetheless.

Buttercup
2011-Aug-20, 04:18 PM
I made another summer dessert from my recently purchased recipe book: homemade Salted Caramel Ice Cream.

A local (franchise) restaurant serves warm bread pudding with a scoop of vanilla ice cream topped with salted caramel sauce. I saw it on the menu, wanted to order it...but didn't.

I intend to try it soon though.

PetersCreek
2011-Aug-20, 07:49 PM
A local (franchise) restaurant serves warm bread pudding with a scoop of vanilla ice cream topped with salted caramel sauce. I saw it on the menu, wanted to order it...but didn't.

I intend to try it soon though.

My favorite dessert at my favorite restaurant is maple-apple bread pudding with a boubon caramel sauce, topped with crispy bacon crumbles. It's delicious without but the bacon takes it to another level entirely.

Buttercup
2011-Aug-20, 08:09 PM
My favorite dessert at my favorite restaurant is maple-apple bread pudding with a boubon caramel sauce, topped with crispy bacon crumbles. It's delicious without but the bacon takes it to another level entirely.

Oh. My. God.

Yeah, I can imagine! Mmmmmm. :D

Buttercup
2011-Sep-29, 03:39 PM
*Oink Oink* :)

I took a 1-hour break from work, during which I went through McD's drive-thru for 2 egg & cheese biscuits and a small orange juice. Intended to eat only 1 of the egg & cheese biscuits and save the other for tomorrow. But I'm extra hungry today, so wolfed both of them down -- lol! With a sprinkle of black pepper and dab of blackberry jam. Mmmmm!!

Buttercup
2011-Oct-20, 09:06 PM
I am craving (yes -- CRAVING) a fried Spam sandwich with pineapple. I'd love some french fries to go with it. Downed with an icy cold Diet Pepsi.

But I can't eat Spam (or other meat). :(

The Backroad Astronomer
2011-Oct-21, 12:17 PM
Come on buttercup give into the dark side. Come join us and eat meat and rule the buffet table of life.

danscope
2011-Oct-25, 12:11 AM
" Would you care for a 'jelly baby ' ? "

Buttercup
2011-Oct-25, 02:06 AM
Lol, TheOnComingStorm. :-p I gave into the dark side once...didn't like the cookies.


" Would you care for a 'jelly baby ' ? "

Don't know. What is it??

Yesterday I had a wicked craving for turkey pot pie. :*-(

danscope
2011-Oct-25, 03:30 AM
Hi, Doctor Who always kept some Jelly babies in a paper bag in that voluminous coat of his. It was a special majic trick. An endless supply of Jelly Babies in his pocket , along with a yo-yo , or ' local gravity detector ' . Truly .... "A man for all time " . :)

Buttercup
2011-Oct-25, 07:26 PM
Hi, Doctor Who always kept some Jelly babies in a paper bag in that voluminous coat of his. It was a special majic trick. An endless supply of Jelly Babies in his pocket , along with a yo-yo , or ' local gravity detector ' . Truly .... "A man for all time " . :)

Oh. :D Teehee.

Just got back from a Japanese restaurant. The 3 other ladies (relatives) are very well traveled. Have been to Japan.

They ate their box lunches with forks.

I, meanwhile, never having crossed either ocean...ate my sushi with chopsticks. And like a pro! :)

Miso soup (seaweed & tofu) beforehand. Delicate. Not too salty. Rich broth. I then had a "Philadelphia Roll," which is vegetarian, including cream cheese (as the name implies). Didn't look like much on the plate, but it was filling. :) Also tried wasabi (pass!) and candied ginger (pass!). It's been ages since I had Japanese. The sushi was delicious. Marjorie gave me 2 pieces of Tempura from her box lunch: A tender and tasty carrot plank, and big slice of zucchini. I dipped each sesame dipping oil...yum.

Friends had box lunches which included Tempura vegetables, fried dumplings, chicken in a brown sauce, rice, sushi, etc.

Fazor
2011-Oct-25, 07:41 PM
I, meanwhile, never having crossed either ocean...ate my sushi with chopsticks. And like a pro! :)


I *can* use sticks, but I'm not very good with them. Some days it's better than others. Haven't had food that'd be chop-stick appropriate in a long time though.

NEOWatcher
2011-Oct-25, 07:47 PM
I *can* use sticks, but I'm not very good with them.
Does holding one stick in each hand count as using them?

Fazor
2011-Oct-25, 08:21 PM
Does holding one stick in each hand count as using them?

. . . How else are you supposed to do it?

Swift
2011-Oct-25, 09:52 PM
Oh. :D Teehee.

Just got back from a Japanese restaurant. The 3 other ladies (relatives) are very well traveled. Have been to Japan.

They ate their box lunches with forks.

I, meanwhile, never having crossed either ocean...ate my sushi with chopsticks. And like a pro! :)

Miso soup (seaweed & tofu) beforehand. Delicate. Not too salty. Rich broth. I then had a "Philadelphia Roll," which is vegetarian, including cream cheese (as the name implies). Didn't look like much on the plate, but it was filling. :) Also tried wasabi (pass!) and candied ginger (pass!). It's been ages since I had Japanese. The sushi was delicious. Marjorie gave me 2 pieces of Tempura from her box lunch: A tender and tasty carrot plank, and big slice of zucchini. I dipped each sesame dipping oil...yum.

Friends had box lunches which included Tempura vegetables, fried dumplings, chicken in a brown sauce, rice, sushi, etc.
A fork! :naughty: Several people told me when I visited Japan in 1990 that they were impressed that I knew how to use chop sticks, they didn't think Americans knew how.

By the way, those box lunches in Japan are called Bento Boxes and they are what I usually like to get at our local Japanese restaurant.

I like wasabi, in small doses, and I like the ginger (though if it the thin, pink stuff, it is actually pickled, not candied - but there is also a candied ginger).

Our two relatively new cats (a year and half old) are named Maki (a type of sushi) and Ginger (for pickled ginger).

Buttercup
2011-Oct-25, 10:24 PM
A fork! :naughty: Several people told me when I visited Japan in 1990 that they were impressed that I knew how to use chop sticks, they didn't think Americans knew how.

I was surprised my friends opted for their forks, considering they've been to Japan. And there was no second thought on their part, i.e. "Buttercup is using chopsticks; maybe we should too." They've also been to China. Me? Never even been to California -- lol!


... and I like the ginger (though if it the thin, pink stuff, it is actually pickled, not candied - but there is also a candied ginger).

Oh...okay, this was pickled ginger then. Thanks for correcting. :)


Our two relatively new cats (a year and half old) are named Maki (a type of sushi) and Ginger (for pickled ginger).

^_^

danscope
2011-Oct-26, 12:05 AM
Hi, Love the pickled ginger. Easy on the wasabi !!!!!! If you have lots of time , the chop sticks are fun. The Ahi was delicious . I am gradually doing less meat
and lots more fish ( peschetarian ) . My cardiologist is hiding behind the screens 'everywhere' . And my wife tells on me. :)
I'd like to build a really nice hibachi ... the real thing. Or maybe a suspended grill in my fire place. Something different for special occasions.

Dan

geonuc
2011-Oct-26, 08:55 AM
Concerning chopsticks: a foodie friend and I once went to a small Asian restaurant in the Atlanta area - I think it was Vietnamese, might have been Korean - where, before they would allow us to order, we were subjected to a test of our skills. We had to pick up uncooked beans with chopsticks. Mind you, this was a very non-Americanized restaurant - there was not a Caucasian in sight other than ourselves and nobody there spoke English very well. Apparently, they were concerned that we were ordering things we would not like, and if we demonstrated that we were familiar with the cuisine, they would go ahead and serve us.

We passed and had a great meal.

jokergirl
2011-Oct-26, 12:22 PM
On the other hand: If you go to Thailand (Malaysia and Singapore too, I think) and ask for chopsticks, they will look at you funnily. "We are civilised people; we use a fork and a spoon, not wooden sticks!"
(We learned that preparing for a recent trip to Thailand - here in Sweden it's pretty common to get chopsticks in Thai restaurants, especially the many of them that combine Thai and Japanese cuisine. I think many Swedes assume that Asia==Chopsticks, no matter what the country.)

;)

PetersCreek
2011-Oct-26, 04:01 PM
- but there is also a candied ginger).

I like pickled ginger with my sushi. I like the candied variety for my poultry and pork brine.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-26, 10:39 PM
On the other hand: If you go to Thailand (Malaysia and Singapore too, I think) and ask for chopsticks, they will look at you funnily. "We are civilised people; we use a fork and a spoon, not wooden sticks!"
(We learned that preparing for a recent trip to Thailand - here in Sweden it's pretty common to get chopsticks in Thai restaurants, especially the many of them that combine Thai and Japanese cuisine. I think many Swedes assume that Asia==Chopsticks, no matter what the country.)

;)
Last time I was in Thailand there were chopsticks in the hotel restaurant, but that was because the buffet included sushi, they were intended just for that.

I've tried Vietnamese restaurants, found a nice one in Paris, they only have knives and forks.

Personally I think it depends a lot on the food and would actually like to have both available so I can pick which are most suitable for which dish. For bite-sized yummies, I prefer chopsticks no matter where they're from, it's just plain the best tool invented (after just using the fingers but most restaurants frown at that) for picking up individual thingies and stuffing them in your mouth. This includes picking up the individual rice thingies that fell off the sushi too.

And I like the ginger, I normally eat sushi by taking a pair of pieces of one type, eat a bit of ginger, switch to pair of another type, eat a bit of ginger, etc.
Basically using the ginger to "zero" the taste so each pair of pieces is a fresh taste even it I already tasted it earlier in the meal.
In the town I live we have three sushi places, two of which are chains and one's run by a young couple. I went into the others long enough to see that there are no significant differences in pricing after which I've only ever been to the independent place.

I've yet to be served the sushi arranged the same way on the same platters twice in a row even though I order basically the same every time and they have multiple sets of good chopsticks I've tried as well, no disposables for costumers who bother to eat there instead of taking it home.

Fazor
2011-Oct-27, 01:05 AM
There's supposedly a "good" sushi place in the town I grew up in. I'll have to try it -- all this talk, sooner rather than later. All I usually get to eat is "sushi" from Giant Eagle. Not that I don't like it, but that's like the McBurger compared to a steak at a Bobby Flay joint.

geonuc
2011-Oct-27, 08:35 AM
There's supposedly a "good" sushi place in the town I grew up in. I'll have to try it -- all this talk, sooner rather than later. All I usually get to eat is "sushi" from Giant Eagle. Not that I don't like it, but that's like the McBurger compared to a steak at a Bobby Flay joint.

Possibly more than any other type of food, sushi demands good ingredients (i.e., really fresh fish). If you don't eat sushi much or at all, go to the highest rated sushi place in town when you get an urge.

Bobby Flay is overrated. :p

geonuc
2011-Oct-27, 08:45 AM
I eat sushi fairly often, and as I indicated above, I'm reasonably skilled with chopsticks. That said, I never use chopsticks with sushi. Fingers are just much more useful tools for sushi and it's common enough in the US that you aren't going to offend the sushi chef if he sees you (it's always a 'he' - never seen a female sushi chef). I also mix up tons of wasabi with the shoyu - I'm a complete heretic there.

Swift
2011-Oct-27, 12:59 PM
(it's always a 'he' - never seen a female sushi chef)
I hadn't thought about it, but you are absolutely correct. Kind of strange really.

NEOWatcher
2011-Oct-27, 01:57 PM
I hadn't thought about it, but you are absolutely correct. Kind of strange really.
I tend to think that females are more squeamish about handling raw meats.
How many times have you heard eeeuuw?

Swift
2011-Oct-27, 02:10 PM
I tend to think that females are more squeamish about handling raw meats.
How many times have you heard eeeuuw?
Actually, rarely. There is a butcher shop near my house (Barb & Patty's) that is run by two women. Grinding raw pork for sausage and butchering steers has to be "worse" than handling raw fish. Sure, women butchers aren't common either, but it is not zero.

I love Google - here is a page from a website call Chowhound about the topic (http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/375149).

In Manhattan, there is a female-owned restaurant where the owner is also the sushi chef. The name is Taka Restaurant in the West Village on Grove Street. This got me thinking about why there's such a shortage of female sushi chefs.

I've heard that in Japan it's believed that women's hands are warmer than a man's and the salt content would affect the taste of the fish. This sounds like an old wive's tale to me because, logically, it seems to me that most men's hands sweat more than women's.

There is more discussion there...

Buttercup
2011-Oct-27, 02:25 PM
Regarding lack of female sushi chefs...

Let me say something I have certainly noticed, as restaurants go. Whereas a lot of men still consider it "woman's work" to cook (at home), isn't it ironic that most cooks (in even mom & pop places) are ... men.

But that beats waiting on tables, right? Let the women do that.

The old male doctor/female nurse thing. Let HER deal with the public, tend to/wait on (subservience) others.

Yep.

Swift
2011-Oct-27, 07:05 PM
The old male doctor/female nurse thing. Let HER deal with the public, tend to/wait on (subservience) others.
I don't overall disagree with you. But the funny thing is, there are lots of female doctors now; IIRC, it is close to 50:50 in medical schools in the US. And I see more and more male nurses. Even for top chefs, there are certainly many examples of female chefs, even if there isn't equality. I'm sure there is room for improvement in all of these, but it certainly has changed a lot in my lifetime.

But I have never seen a female sushi chef.

Buttercup
2011-Oct-27, 08:43 PM
I don't overall disagree with you. But the funny thing is, there are lots of female doctors now; IIRC, it is close to 50:50 in medical schools in the US. And I see more and more male nurses. Even for top chefs, there are certainly many examples of female chefs, even if there isn't equality. I'm sure there is room for improvement in all of these, but it certainly has changed a lot in my lifetime.

But I have never seen a female sushi chef.

Definitely agree on your medical doctor comment (which is why I wrote "old" -- as in former days).

What prompted my response was the macho culture where I live. I'd wager 9 out of every 10 male cooks in restaurants here wouldn't dream of lifting a finger in the kitchen at home. And they definitely do NOT want to wait tables. Around 7 years ago, my husband and I actually got attitude from a male waiter; we (politely) asked for a condiment which he'd failed to bring to table. He gave us a drop-dead look, and I half-expected him to tell ME to go get it.

The "little mujeres" around here are gonna wait those tables and serve the public. Not the hombres.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-27, 08:54 PM
But I have never seen a female sushi chef.
At my sushi place it's the woman doing most of the food, with him doing customer relations and logistics, he only steps in and helps with the main cooking when things get really busy.

geonuc
2011-Oct-27, 10:22 PM
I hadn't thought about it, but you are absolutely correct. Kind of strange really.

Yep, very strange. BTW, concerning the Chowhound restaurant thread you linked to - the female sushi chef left and the ratings went down. It's closed now.

BigDon
2011-Oct-27, 10:52 PM
Odd, when I was in Singapore in the '80's they not only used chopsticks, but in some restarants it was considered insulting to ask for flatware and they would have flatware that was specifically designed to be ergonomically horrible. The forks not only having flat tines but were needle sharp as well. Sounds like two really minor details, doesn't it?

You couldn't use one without hurting yourself. Some of our guys who were engineers were impressed with how much thought went into making them badly.

Though some of the smaller places would slide you flatware on the sly if you were having difficulties.

jokergirl
2011-Oct-28, 06:17 AM
Not food related, but something I heard in the waiting room the other month really made my day there and then.

A little boy asked his mother: "Mom, can only girls become doctors?"

(The mother, to her credit, replied in the vein of "Anyone can become anything they want.")

About Singapore, when I was there in summer you got both chopsticks and forks, depending on which place you went to. The Chinese ethnicity Singaporeans seem to use chopsticks while the Malay and Indian ethnicities use forks and spoon. At the hawker stalls it's not unusual to offer both.

;)

Buttercup
2011-Nov-18, 08:40 PM
What on EARTH has McDonald's does to its fries?? :confused:

Just got back from half an hour out. Got an order of fries (fortunately a small order) and a large Diet Coke.

The fries were awful. :( Lately they have NOT been up to par.

I ate 1/4 of the bag...tossed the rest.

And I never throw away french fries!

Good grief.

closetgeek
2011-Nov-21, 01:12 AM
Not food related, but something I heard in the waiting room the other month really made my day there and then.

A little boy asked his mother: "Mom, can only girls become doctors?"

(The mother, to her credit, replied in the vein of "Anyone can become anything they want.")

About Singapore, when I was there in summer you got both chopsticks and forks, depending on which place you went to. The Chinese ethnicity Singaporeans seem to use chopsticks while the Malay and Indian ethnicities use forks and spoon. At the hawker stalls it's not unusual to offer both.

;)

We frequent a Japanese restaurant in a nearby town. It's Hibachi style so we end up sharing a table with a group of strangers. I always find it entertaining, the one or two people that don't bother to look around before telling the server that they forgot the spoons with their soup.

Van Rijn
2011-Nov-21, 01:32 AM
What on EARTH has McDonald's does to its fries?? :confused:


I stopped eating them years ago. I think the big change is when they took out the beef flavoring. I don't go there often, and these days I just buy a cheeseburger if I do. Last time I tasted McDonald's fries, there really wasn't much taste aside from the salt, and I try to avoid that.

Swift
2011-Nov-21, 03:19 AM
What on EARTH has McDonald's does to its fries?? :confused:
I'm confused. Is this thread for talking about food or for talking about McDonald's? :p

Buttercup
2011-Dec-06, 06:09 PM
I'm confused. Is this thread for talking about food or for talking about McDonald's? :p

Lol! :)

Sunday gave in to a serious food craving I've had nearly 2 years. A local restaurant sells breaded and smothered (with white gravy OR with cheese & green chile sauce) chicken tenders on Sundays only. Since I generally cannot eat meat, I've avoided. We were driving past Sunday when I suggested dinner there to husband -- decided to have that dinner and take my chances!

Ordered my chicken tenders (they give a nice portion) with cheese & green chile sauce. Served with mashed potatoes & brown gravy, kernel corn, house salad, and their yummy homemade (from scratch) dinner rolls.

I wolfed it all down! :D Was marvelous. Every bite. :D

Glad to say had very little bad effect afterwards.

Swift
2011-Dec-06, 07:09 PM
Glad to say had very little bad effect afterwards.
We all have to be bad sometimes. And sometimes, by the very fact that we have that bad food rarely, it makes it that much better (even your McD's fries, if that what makes you happy). Cheese and green chile sauce... heck, I'd eat a shoe covered in cheese and green chile sauce.

danscope
2011-Dec-06, 07:12 PM
Ah..... home made dinner rolls. These make the meal. Like David Feherty says.... " It's really just a vehicle to transport butter . " :)
He makes a fine Irish soda bread , maybe a little heavy on the salt. He certainly impressed Darren Clarke.

Best regards,
Dan

Swift
2011-Dec-07, 01:03 AM
Ah..... home made dinner rolls. These make the meal. Like David Feherty says.... " It's really just a vehicle to transport butter . " :)
He makes a fine Irish soda bread , maybe a little heavy on the salt. He certainly impressed Darren Clarke.

Best regards,
Dan
Yeah, good bread and good butter is a pleasure. One of my best breakfasts ever in France was at a little inn I stayed at in Normandy and breakfast was warm, freshly made bread, farm butter (Normandy is known for dairy) and the inn keepers homemade strawberry jam.

Buttercup
2011-Dec-09, 08:05 PM
Yeah, good bread and good butter is a pleasure.

A supervisor (when I worked in an office) once brought a homemade (round loaf) honey bread. It was crusty on the outside, oh-so tender on the inside. And you could taste the honey within. She brought a pound of butter in a crock to go with...

...in record time it was gone, including doctors descending on it! :lol:

I will never forget that treat. ;)

p.s.: Geez, I was so taken with that memory I forgot to mention the real reason for posting: This is my 2nd day without skim milk OR Diet Pepsi. :( I'm surviving though. Simply haven't had time to go to a store to get either.

Fazor
2011-Dec-09, 10:09 PM
I could have sworn I posted this, just 'cause I thought it was ingenious. My great concoction this week was pork chops crusted with . . . gound-up pork rinds! Yes, fried pork skin put back on pork then re-cooked (though baked, rather than fried.)

It worked pretty well, though there's other things I prefer to use for crusting stuff. It was just too fun of an idea to pass on.

starcanuck64
2011-Dec-10, 12:51 AM
One of my favorites, especially on a cold winter day: Spicy Thai Chicken Noodle Soup.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/spicy_chicken_noodle_soup.php

I prefer thicker noodles than the rice vermicelli for texture reasons.

Swift
2011-Dec-10, 01:56 AM
I could have sworn I posted this, just 'cause I thought it was ingenious. My great concoction this week was pork chops crusted with . . . gound-up pork rinds! Yes, fried pork skin put back on pork then re-cooked (though baked, rather than fried.)

It worked pretty well, though there's other things I prefer to use for crusting stuff. It was just too fun of an idea to pass on.
Maybe you could wrap in it in bacon or put some diced ham on it for the complete pig experience. :D

Buttercup
2011-Dec-10, 05:11 PM
One of my favorites, especially on a cold winter day: Spicy Thai Chicken Noodle Soup.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/spicy_chicken_noodle_soup.php

I prefer thicker noodles than the rice vermicelli for texture reasons.

Sounds good! :)

Last night I made meatball and egg dumpling soup. I didn't eat any of the meatballs (wasn't organic beef). Anyway, I used 1/2 pound of ground chuck. Seasoned with garlic & onion powders, black pepper, 2 eggs, and Italian bread crumbs. Formed into 2-bite-sized balls and baked (350 F) until done.

The egg dumplings are simple: Whisked 4 eggs. Added enough Gold Medal flour (just that) until the combo made a thick batter. Each dumpling is 1 teaspoon of the batter dropped into briskly boiling broth.

When meatballs and dumplings were baked/cooked, I made a broth to put them in: Water, powdered chicken bouillion, curry powder, black pepper, powdered chile, tomato sauce.

Added a can of peas 'n carrots.

Stirred. Heated all together.

It was GOOD. Served with plain toasted whole wheat bread. The broth soaked up in the bread was delicious, and the dumplings turned out just as I'd hoped.

Buttercup
2012-Jan-30, 08:10 PM
Nutella Banana Crepes from IHOP.

To *die* for.

Took husband for breakfast this a.m. (his birthday). He had steak, eggs, hash browns, toast. I had 2 eggs and the aforementioned Nutella Banana Crepes. Oh the bliss!!! :D They're also served with a light strawberry compote (initially thought I wouldn't like that with, but after tasting it did!) and whipped cream. *Ohhhh* :D Each bite a total delight.

If you haven't yet tried these crepes, get thee to IHOP pronto. ;)

BigDon
2012-Feb-01, 09:17 PM
Word of advice to my BAUT friends.

If you get that mid-winter yen for greens, try not to scratch that itch by eating an entire head of lettuce at a sitting, no matter how well you made the balsamic vinegarette.

Not unless you're sure you have an open seat for the loo long about 4 AM.

You would have thought I packed down a entire mower bag full of lawn clippings.