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jokergirl
2008-Jul-25, 12:29 PM
I may have mentioned in another thread that I have a foodie blog somewhere offsite...

So who else here takes more than a "normal" interest in food?
And of course, do you have any recipes to recommend?

;)

Fazor
2008-Jul-25, 12:35 PM
I love food and cooking; if I'm not watching sports or stuck watching the g/f's crap (99% HGTV *barf* 1% disney-channel non-cartoon shows *barf more*) I'm watching food network.

Tonight I plan on making turkey burgers with a plum sauce. I don't use recipes, so we'll see how that goes. :)

Jay200MPH
2008-Jul-25, 12:35 PM
I do! I love cooking - either perfecting old dishes or experimenting with new ideas. Right now I'm on a big North African kick and I've been working the styles of that part of the world into most of my meals. Great fun. Unfortunately I live alone so I don't get to cook for others very often, which is part of the fun.

- J

Doodler
2008-Jul-25, 12:40 PM
I do a lot of improv cooking, and have been told I should have been a chef. The problem is, I hate doing stuff the same way twice, and having worked in a small restaurant (not a chain), I'd rather scorch the tastebuds off my tongue than deal with some of the clients I've seen roll through there.

Fazor
2008-Jul-25, 01:06 PM
I do a lot of improv cooking, and have been told I should have been a chef. The problem is, I hate doing stuff the same way twice, and having worked in a small restaurant (not a chain), I'd rather scorch the tastebuds off my tongue than deal with some of the clients I've seen roll through there.

Agreed. See, I'd love to go to culinary school, and it's one of the things I've thought about doing to get out of my current field. But I don't want to be a resturant chef. I think I'd be happy as one of the .. uh .. "Chefologists" (whatever their real title is) that create dishes to be added to menus, but does not sit and cook them all night every night.

Swift
2008-Jul-25, 02:10 PM
Me! My wife and I are both pretty big foodies. A lot of our trip to Italy was food oriented, including a cooking class. Among my many pictures, I took photos of most of our meals and took notes about them.

geonuc
2008-Jul-25, 03:39 PM
I are a foodie. I was a moderator on the local food forum for a long time.

atlantacuisine.com

PetersCreek
2008-Jul-25, 05:34 PM
I love to cook...in the kitchen and out. I often cook by the seat of my pants, starting with no recipe at all. I'm a smoker of meats and other foods. I cure and smoke my own Canadian bacon and sausages. Every once in a while, I make my own fresh mozzarella. I grill year-round...in Alaska...which often means shovelling a path to the grill.

I guess that makes me a foodie. The Wife® is no slouch, either, so we keep each other well fed.

jokergirl
2008-Jul-25, 06:06 PM
Wow. Your own mozzarella? Where do you get the buffalo milk from and do you have photos of the process?

I'm cooking vegetarian or fish exclusively, but I am having a lot of fun adapting meat recipes. Right now there are vegetarian stuffed peppers steaming in my oven... *goes to check on them*

;)

MAPNUT
2008-Jul-25, 06:10 PM
"Foodie", a necessary new word. I cook, my wife cooks, and one of my sons cooks when necessary. My other son and my daughter, however, are foodies.

Swift
2008-Jul-25, 06:17 PM
I often cook by the seat of my pants,
Uh, um, well, whatever works for you. :p

Fazor
2008-Jul-25, 06:19 PM
Uh, um, well, whatever works for you. :p

Bioheat. He's going green.

...and so are his dinner guests. :)

PetersCreek
2008-Jul-25, 06:45 PM
Wow. Your own mozzarella? Where do you get the buffalo milk from and do you have photos of the process?

I'm cooking vegetarian or fish exclusively, but I am having a lot of fun adapting meat recipes. Right now there are vegetarian stuffed peppers steaming in my oven... *goes to check on them*

;)

I haven't found a drop of water buffalo milk in Alaska, yet. Go figure. I buy organic, non-homogenized, whole milk from the local health nut store. I haven't photographed the process myself but there are several excellent guides on the net, such as Fankhauser's Cheese Page (http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser/Cheese/cheese.html). He doesn't recommend making mozzarella as your first cheese but of course, I didn't listen to such alarmist nonsense. Fortunately, I didn't have much trouble and acheived edible results the first time.

PetersCreek
2008-Jul-25, 06:52 PM
I do, however, have a photo or two that document my Canadian bacon making. Sorry...it's not vegetarian, I know...but pigs eat veggies and that's close enough for me. :razz:

cplradar
2008-Jul-25, 07:01 PM
I'm fat-relative to people who are "normal"-and like to eat. Therefore, I found cooking necessary to satisfy whatever need I might have. Usually sausage scallopini or other nonsense at 03:00. I am a foodie?

turbo-1
2008-Jul-25, 07:23 PM
I raise a vegetable garden with lots of VERY hot chilies, including some snarly habanero peppers. I make salsas and chili relishes with the produce. The tomatoes, peppers, garlic, dill and other herbs, etc all came out of this dirt.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/gardenshot.jpg

Here is one cupboard full of (mostly) hot stuff. There are several more, including larger under-counter cupboards that I fill every summer.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/smallcupboard.jpg

Here is one small batch of habanero relish in the beginning stages. Just habanero peppers, Russian garlic and minced dill florets at this stage. The habanero relish is so hot that I can only use about 1/2 tsp of it on a hot dog without making it 'way too hot. So far, my brother is the only other person that can stand that kind of heat. I have a friend in NY who really liked a batch that I made from store-bought habaneros a couple of years ago. The home-grown peppers are WAY hotter, and I'll be interested to see what he thinks next time he visits.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/habanerorelish.jpg

geonuc
2008-Jul-25, 08:17 PM
I raise a vegetable garden with lots of VERY hot chilies, including some snarly habanero peppers.
Cool, I mean hot. I've been growing habaneros for about 15 years or so. My favorites are the Red Savina (I think I posted a picture of one here somewhere), but I'd like to get some Naga Jolokia plants.

Tried a hot sauce recently that was blend of both Red Savina and Naga Jolokia. Along with being quite warm, it was very tasty.

Naga Saurus, it's called.

geonuc
2008-Jul-25, 10:12 PM
So far, my brother is the only other person that can stand that kind of heat. I have a friend in NY who really liked a batch that I made from store-bought habaneros a couple of years ago. The home-grown peppers are WAY hotter, and I'll be interested to see what he thinks next time he visits.
I used to think that once. Then I met my father-in-law. I swear, the guy could sprinkle ground up habaneros on his corn flakes.

But he has since passed on, so I'm back in your boat. It's a curse, I tell you. Nothing is spicy enough. :(

turbo-1
2008-Jul-25, 10:13 PM
Cool, I mean hot. I've been growing habaneros for about 15 years or so. My favorites are the Red Savina (I think I posted a picture of one here somewhere), but I'd like to get some Naga Jolokia plants.

Tried a hot sauce recently that was blend of both Red Savina and Naga Jolokia. Along with being quite warm, it was very tasty.

Naga Saurus, it's called.The guys I buy the habanero plants from call them red carribeans, but they may well be savinas. Scotch bonnets are NO match for these little rascals. They are good green (if frost threatens) but they are great when red. My habanero relish is absolutely the hottest condiment I've ever tasted. The garlic and dill and other ingredients round out the flavor and make the relish very tasty, but that can't hide the heat. If I eat one hot dog with 1/2 tsp of that relish spread throughout the roll, my scalp is saturated. Love the burn. The heat is relentless, though.

turbo-1
2008-Jul-25, 10:20 PM
I used to think that once. Then I met my father-in-law. I swear, the guy could sprinkle ground up habaneros on his corn flakes.

But he has since passed on, so I'm back in your boat. It's a curse, I tell you. Nothing is spicy enough. :(My father-in-law (now passed) grew some very hot peppers that looked like some moderate (jalapeno-heat) peppers that I raised. My father (now 82) saw me pulling the milder peppers out of my shirt pocket and eating them as I often did, and I'd make a face. He said "are those really hot?" and I told him that they were pretty snarly. He said "give me one" and I handed him one of the father-in-law's scorchers. He took one bite and ran for the sink. I was laughing so hard that I thought I'd cry, then I explained what I did to him. He begged for the chilies so I gave them to him so he could play the same trick on some chili-heads at work. I snapped the stems off the jalapenos so that he could tell the difference and only eat those. :evil:

ginnie
2008-Jul-25, 10:22 PM
I raise a vegetable garden with lots of VERY hot chilies, including some snarly habanero peppers. I make salsas and chili relishes with the produce. The tomatoes, peppers, garlic, dill and other herbs, etc all came out of this dirt.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/gardenshot.jpg

Here is one cupboard full of (mostly) hot stuff. There are several more, including larger under-counter cupboards that I fill every summer.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/smallcupboard.jpg

Here is one small batch of habanero relish in the beginning stages. Just habanero peppers, Russian garlic and minced dill florets at this stage. The habanero relish is so hot that I can only use about 1/2 tsp of it on a hot dog without making it 'way too hot. So far, my brother is the only other person that can stand that kind of heat. I have a friend in NY who really liked a batch that I made from store-bought habaneros a couple of years ago. The home-grown peppers are WAY hotter, and I'll be interested to see what he thinks next time he visits.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/habanerorelish.jpg

I am very envious of your yard!
I guess I'm a foodle if I:
Do eighty percent of our cooking at home.
Watch a lot of cooking shows.

Is that right?
I don't cook anything too fancy, and I don't grow anything. My wife grows lots of herbs that I use though. My latest neat book is a book of Sauces - which can make or break any meal IMO.

turbo-1
2008-Jul-25, 10:32 PM
I am very envious of your yard!
I guess I'm a foodle if I:
Do eighty percent of our cooking at home.
Watch a lot of cooking shows.

Is that right?
I don't cook anything too fancy, and I don't grow anything. My wife grows lots of herbs that I use though. My latest neat book is a book of Sauces - which can make or break any meal IMO.The yard is nothing special, but I have tilled truck-loads of peat, composted cow manure, and organic fertilizers (blood meal, fish meal, etc) and composted garden/yard waste into that garden plot. I've been gardening since a child (~50 years) and when my wife and I bought this place, I was determined to turn that chunk of clay and rocks into real soil.

I am the saucier of the family. Many of my wife's favorite recipes originated when she found a deal on shrimp, meat, etc, and she tasked me with inventing sauces/marinades to cook them with.

hhEb09'1
2008-Jul-25, 11:11 PM
Tonight I plan on making turkey burgers with a plum sauce. I don't use recipes, so we'll see how that goes. :)Do you throw chopped olives and cheeses into the mix? That seems to be the favorite around here.

Here's a recipe that does not work. You all know how to fix it:

Rainbow Soup

8 Red potatoes
1 T. Orange zest
3 T. Yellow butter
1 can Green chilis
1 pkg. Blue cheese
1 Purple onion
1 c. milk
2 T. flour
1 dash vinegar

Peel and dice potatoes and boil not quite covered in water until cooked. Do not drain--mash once or twice. Saute chopped onion in butter, and stir in flour, add with other ingredients to potatoes, stir and simmer. Add vinegar, salt, and pepper to taste.

Serve with diced green chili mixed with crumbled blue cheese, and/or cheese cubes, sour cream, guacamole, or bits of ham or bacon.

Whirlpool
2008-Jul-26, 12:14 AM
I raise a vegetable garden with lots of VERY hot chilies, including some snarly habanero peppers. I make salsas and chili relishes with the produce. The tomatoes, peppers, garlic, dill and other herbs, etc all came out of this dirt.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/gardenshot.jpg

Here is one cupboard full of (mostly) hot stuff. There are several more, including larger under-counter cupboards that I fill every summer.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/smallcupboard.jpg

Here is one small batch of habanero relish in the beginning stages. Just habanero peppers, Russian garlic and minced dill florets at this stage. The habanero relish is so hot that I can only use about 1/2 tsp of it on a hot dog without making it 'way too hot. So far, my brother is the only other person that can stand that kind of heat. I have a friend in NY who really liked a batch that I made from store-bought habaneros a couple of years ago. The home-grown peppers are WAY hotter, and I'll be interested to see what he thinks next time he visits.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/habanerorelish.jpg

Hi Turbo, you a nice garden there.

Those hot stuffs are really enticing.

I make my own hot sauces and dips but not like yours. You have the entire cabinet there filled with them!

Usually mine are simple and enough only for today's meal.

I cook , but I'm not a good cook. My mom is . She's a magician.

I enjoy watching the shows in the food network , and I have a collection of Food Magazines at home.

I don't know if I'm a foodie by that description.

http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons7/106.gif

Fazor
2008-Jul-26, 01:15 AM
Do you throw chopped olives and cheeses into the mix? That seems to be the favorite around here.


Cheese yes (provolone), Olives no. It's the first time I made Plumb-Turkey Burgers, and just winged it. Ended up with more of a plumb-based BBQ. And it was good.

But olives might work well; salty would have been an interesting depth of flavor to the sweetish sauce. I may try that next time; though might be too much with the red onion and lettuce I plan to add (just didn't have any tonight to throw on it).

BigDon
2008-Jul-26, 02:06 AM
One of my favorite simple dishes, where adding anything detracts from the overall result is sauteing sliced zuchinni (marrow to the Brits) in butter with sliced mushrooms, until everybody's tender and the mushrooms surrender their liquids. Salt and pepper to taste of course.

And why are you folks coming up with the habs and scotch bonnets for? If I'm entertaining I usually only go as high as serranos without a lot of warning ahead of time. Fresh habs will raise blisters on your bare flesh, its happened to me before, making chili. Two habs, with seeds, made a batch of chili, two gallons in volume, too hot for most of my folks to eat. I had to eat most of it myself. (Wow, that was 16 years ago!)

danscope
2008-Jul-26, 02:46 AM
[QUOTE=jokergirl;1289563]I may have mentioned in another thread that I have a foodie blog somewhere offsite...

So who else here takes more than a "normal" interest in food?
And of course, do you have any recipes to recommend?

******************

Hi Jokergirl,

I enjoy cooking . Over time I'll share a few recipies you'll probably like....
including
Scratch Pancakes with sour cream, orange juice and zest

Waffles ( simillar take off of above .....wicked good :) )

Your very own scrumptious CORNED BEEF HASH (Rave reviews )

Delicious and easy CHICKEN IN AN HOUR ( DEAD SIMPLE and foolproof)

Rave reviews PIZZA ....a revelation .

A quite good Italian gravy (Tomato gravy made good and easy ).

Secret flavour Boston Baked Beans ( some rocket science involved)

Wicked Mocha frosting

Ask me what you want . Recipies shall be forth comming.

Best regards, Dan

ginnie
2008-Jul-26, 03:08 AM
Why wait!
I want your corned beef hash and Italian gravy recipe now.

Karl
2008-Jul-26, 03:26 AM
I may have mentioned in another thread that I have a foodie blog somewhere offsite...

So who else here takes more than a "normal" interest in food?
And of course, do you have any recipes to recommend?

;)


We were at a friend's party a few years ago and a woman asks me: "So, are you a physics or a foodie?" (Reflecting the bimodal distribution of the guests.)

My response was: "Ummmmm, do I have to choose?"

Been concentrating recently on old fashioned low and slow original American barbecue.

Karl
2008-Jul-26, 03:32 AM
One of my favorite simple dishes, where adding anything detracts from the overall result is sauteing sliced zuchinni (marrow to the Brits) in butter with sliced mushrooms, until everybody's tender and the mushrooms surrender their liquids. Salt and pepper to taste of course.


I usually add a little shallot or Vidalia onion too. And for the salt I've been using the Redmond Real Salt with lots of trace minerals. I thinks it really enhances the flavors.

sarongsong
2008-Jul-26, 05:34 AM
...do you have any recipes to recommend?
BAUT's Quick and Dirty Recipes (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/58609-quick-dirty-recipes.html) :)

jokergirl
2008-Jul-26, 09:03 AM
I raise my own Thai chilies on my windowsill.
Having just bought a lovely bright apartment, I also raise tomatoes, purple potatoes, and salad now. Had zucchini but only got one zucchini from them before I had to cut them down due to mite infestation (damn bugs!).

I don't have much experience with Habaneros, the ones you get here are rather disappointingly mild. If you get hold of some seeds, send them to me! :lol:

;)

turbo-1
2008-Jul-26, 05:33 PM
And why are you folks coming up with the habs and scotch bonnets for? If I'm entertaining I usually only go as high as serranos without a lot of warning ahead of time. Fresh habs will raise blisters on your bare flesh, its happened to me before, making chili. Two habs, with seeds, made a batch of chili, two gallons in volume, too hot for most of my folks to eat. I had to eat most of it myself. (Wow, that was 16 years ago!)I like really hot food, and my wife eats some of my relishes that are much too hot for most folks, but she keeps her distance from the red habanero relish. That's OK because the short growing season in Maine limits the number of ripe ones I can get and I NEED that chili relish on my hot-dogs, along with Farmers brand hot beer mustard made with horseradish.

A freak storm with heavy downdrafts flattened my pepper plants two nights ago, but thankfully, we had already gotten over 2" of rain before the heaviest rains and winds hit, so the soil was soft enough to "give" so the pepper plants were not broken off. Lost a few branches and a few peppers. I have straightened and staked the plants and they seem to be bouncing back.

turbo-1
2008-Jul-26, 05:43 PM
Habanero relish is easy.

Get a couple of dozen habanero peppers and a whole bulb of garlic. Remove the stems from the peppers, leaving the seeds, placentas, etc intact (that's where the heat is!), separate and peel the cloves of garlic and chop the peppers and garlic thoroughly in a food processor. Cook the chopped stuff in about a cup of vinegar, until it's the consistency you want, and add about a tsp each of salt and sugar, and a couple of tbs of molasses. Spoon into sterilized jelly jars, top with sterilized lids and rings and process the sealed jars in boiling water for 20 minutes. You might get up to 4 little 1/2 cup jars of relish, depending on the size of the habaneros.

geonuc
2008-Jul-26, 05:58 PM
And why are you folks coming up with the habs and scotch bonnets for? If I'm entertaining I usually only go as high as serranos without a lot of warning ahead of time. Fresh habs will raise blisters on your bare flesh, its happened to me before, making chili.
Entertaining, sure - habs are too much. But like Turbo-1, I have a really high heat tolerance. That doesn't mean that I like to inflict pain on myself. It means I don't taste things as being spicy unless they're well up the Scoville chart. Like I said, it's a curse, really.

turbo-1
2008-Jul-26, 08:51 PM
A neighbor of mine is an organic gardener, and he gave me lots of Russian garlic and German garlic (much larger, interesting flavor) from his garden. He told me that he liked really hot foods, so I used his garlic and my habanero peppers to make habanero relish (recipe above) and gave him a couple of jars. He doesn't eat meat, but the hab relish makes his soy-dogs palatable (he says...) and he took one of my jars of relish to work one night when the crew was ordering in sub sandwiches for lunch. He hauled out that little jar and a spoon and was judiciously spreading relish on his sandwich, when a guy who always acts macho about heat (puts wimpy Tobasco sauce on his sandwiches) asked what that was. Al told him it was a hot chili relish that his neighbor gave him and the guy said "give me some for my sandwich" and put on about as much as Al did on his. Al says that the guy took one bite and his eyes got real serious-looking, and that after the second bite, his face flushed and sweat beaded up on his face. The guy threw his sandwich in the trash and gave Al hell for letting him use the relish. Warning - do not demand that your co-worker share hot stuff after he's told you that it's hot.

ginnie
2008-Jul-26, 08:57 PM
A co-worker once brought in homemade pickles that her neighbour made.
They were pickled in garlic/hot pepper.
My, they were the best tasting pickles I had ever had - then or since - by far.
I asked for the recipe, but her neighbour wouldn't give it. Imagine that?
Why do people do that?

Neverfly
2008-Jul-26, 09:03 PM
A co-worker once brought in homemade pickles that her neighbour made.
They were pickled in garlic/hot pepper.
My, they were the best tasting pickles I had ever had - then or since - by far.
I asked for the recipe, but her neighbour wouldn't give it. Imagine that?
Why do people do that?

Because they have something special.

Imagine if you wanted to BUY some pickles...

turbo-1
2008-Jul-26, 10:07 PM
A co-worker once brought in homemade pickles that her neighbour made.
They were pickled in garlic/hot pepper.
My, they were the best tasting pickles I had ever had - then or since - by far.
I asked for the recipe, but her neighbour wouldn't give it. Imagine that?
Why do people do that?Here's what you do. Get a nice old, traditional dill pickle recipe and follow that to a T, but add lots of garlic and a few hot chilies. That's what I do for mild heat in dill pickles. I also make dill-pickled jalapeno rings with garlic using the same dill-pickle recipe with NO cucumbers, only jalapeno peppers and garlic cloves. The garlic cloves are really wonderful and my wife and I (pretend) fight over them.

Use traditional recipes (usually the simplest and the best) and add lots of garlic, and peppers to taste. I grow my own dill (you can too if you have a deck or back yard and a window-box, though my dill grown down in the garden seems to do lots better) and I grow so much that I never have to use dill weed or seed heads in my sauces and relishes. I use the tiny florets from the flowering dill heads - they have a fantastic taste, and you will never find that in a store.

ginnie
2008-Jul-26, 10:21 PM
Good ideas.
I've adapted recipes before.
I used an old chilli recipe - adding hot peppers and onions - voila, great homemade salsa!
...hmm, coincidentally, we do have dill growing out in the back yard.

I've been to a couple of European Grocery Stores lately. Man, you can find pickled everything! Picked up some pickled garlic and olives. Yumm. Also some 'forest' jam and really good light and dark rye bread.

turbo-1
2008-Jul-26, 11:05 PM
Good ideas.
I've adapted recipes before.
I used an old chilli recipe - adding hot peppers and onions - voila, great homemade salsa!
...hmm, coincidentally, we do have dill growing out in the back yard.

I've been to a couple of European Grocery Stores lately. Man, you can find pickled everything! Picked up some pickled garlic and olives. Yumm. Also some 'forest' jam and really good light and dark rye bread.When your dill starts flowering, taste some of the little yellow florets. You will never use dill weed or seed heads again. They have a rich and complex flavor that is perfect in pickles and salsas.

danscope
2008-Jul-27, 12:34 AM
Why wait!
I want your corned beef hash and Italian gravy recipe now.

Hi Ginnie,

Simple but different:

Cook up some corned beef. Take say...2 1/2 lbs of corned beef and
place it in a stainless steel kettle and cover with cold water. Cover.
Bring it to a boil and then simmer ....for 2 to 3 hours..as per package.
That's fairly standard. Now....

Take a couple of onions , chop them and saute in some olive oil and butter
with a little salt and pepper.

Take 2 1/2 pounds of potatoes ( red or new potatoes work well ) and simmer them untill not quite done... ( if they get mushy they turn to paste ...not good for hash
Cut up Corned beef for 1" by 2" chunks .

NOW....in a kitchen aid mixer with the grinder attatchment..coarse die ,
with the great bowl to recieve what you put through....
put a piece of corned beef, some onions, then some potatoes ....
repeat until all is ground through...and finish with a slice of bread...an endslice will work fine....pushes the good stuff through.

OK....now, put the dough hook on and let it stir the product.
Now the spices...:
This from James Beard ...
Fresh ground allspice berries....
And Ginger
and some fresh cracked pepper.
Sprinkle the spices evenly throughout the mixture so as to get it nice and even. It does no good to have a bunch here, and nothing there.
How much? welll, I use about a table spoon of allspice ,
and a table spoon of ginger...maybe more. I like these.
and pepper to taste.
You don't need any salt .
You can push these spices as you please....but there's a limit .
I even use fresh ginger root ....finely pulverized in a spice grinder,
but that's me. .

Now....take all this and put it up into a 2 lb. ricotta cheese container.
These are tapered so as to let it out when chilled. Refrigerate. If you have a second partial container, line the top of the level with saran wrap, keeping the air away from the product. Always protect your product with plastic wrap within the container. This works.
It will certainly keep for a week. Longer if frozen.
-----------
Early the next morning, invert the container and knock it out on your cutting board . The entire tapered cyclinder will come out.
With a good sharpe knife, cut a slice 3/4 inch thick and saute this in a nice ,
no-stick saute pan with a little butter . Medium high heat. Watch it.
It should not stick. Flip it at perhaps 3 minutes ( look for a little color ...
not dark! ) . This stuff goes well with most anything. Canned is but a poor pretender to the REAL Thing.

Perhaps a couple of poached eggs ...or french toast...or the odd waffle ?

:) May this recipie find you happy.
Best regards, Dan

danscope
2008-Jul-27, 01:25 AM
Hi Ginnie,

You asked about a nice gravy.

I use two large cans of tomatoes, one crushed , and one whole,peeled
italian plum tomatoes.....( crush them with your clean hands ..this works.)
I heat these up in a microwave oven . Gets them to temperature without
burning them. This is good. ( Cover them please )

I have a vegetable juicer. You see them in yard sales for $5 . They are superb for juicing carrots. I take about 5 carrots and run them through the juicer. Save the pulp! Save the juice!.

Saute the onions ( one large...or two medium...)
Fine chop some celery....( I run some through the juicer myself )
In a large stirfry wok...no-stick....I saute the onions in olive oil and butter
add the carrot pulp, and half a can of tomato paste , and some fine crushed garlic..(near the end..2 minutes is plenty of time for the garlic. Burned garlic is not a good thing at all)...salt and pepper....and oregano..and basil. Stir this with a silicon spatula....these do not scratch the pan and get all the product off the bottom as you cook. Keep stiring this mixture without fail. It developes many good flavours ...so long as it does not burn. 5 minutes...? When done, add the hot tomatoes.Add the carrot juice. Rinse the cans with a little hot water(1/2 cup and add. Be carefull. Gloves are good. Aprons are very good. In a BEEEG pot (SS ) stainless steel ...
put some olive oil in bottom...medium heat.

NOTE: My wok is large , so I can handle assembly in that. If it is easier for you, combine the ingredients ,once cooked, in the large (Beeg ) pot.
Comebine all ingedients in there . Reduce heat to simmer when it bubbles.
Cover. Set timer. Stir 5 minutes later. Keep watching and stirring .
Your nose will tell you when you are done. You can thin the gravy with a little chicken stock if you like. Yes,...you can stir and talk on the phone.
If children interrupt, turn down the heat to almost nothing and set timer for 5 minutes. THIS WORKS. Forgotten Gravy seldom saves. Scortched gravy is unsalvageable. Trust me. You never need a lot of heat to cook this. You need time and care. It is....quite simple, really.
A little celery salt, and fresh cracked pepper . FRESH BASIL? JOY!
When a gravy is up to temperature, it does not require a great deal of heat at all. Your pan makes a difference. A heavy bottom pan is golden.
NEVER USE ALLUMINUM !!!!!!! THE acid in the tomato attacks the metal .
This is not good. Really not good. Porcelin lined cast iron is good too.
Bring lots of money...$140 .

The secret here is that the fine grated carrots and celery give the gravy a nice, fine texture , is less watery, and welcomes items like pizza ,
fried eggplant, oven roasted meat balls, last night's left over porkchop,
well....take it your way.
You should have it pretty well done in an hour.
You can simmer a gravy in a double boiler for hours if you want to or covered in a slow cooker....BUT.....to tell the truth, the vitamins are going south. Once it is cooked, you can cool it off and refrigerate in glass or stainless steel. And it is always better tommorrow.

There is no need to add sugar. The carrots introduce enough of a sweetening agent. Besides...sugar can and often burns on the bottom.
There's a limit to how much salt you really need in a gravy.
A little garlic is a nice thing.
A little fresh cracked pepper is better than pre-ground 2 year old pepper.
TRY some fresh herbs . They are an illumination.
A little fresh snipped basil when served is often appreciated.

Perhaps some fresh basil foccacia on the table.....with a little onion in it..
Ah..... simmer some braciole in the gravy... or some meat balls...or grilled
sausage... and some shells or spaghetti .
Yea......take a large frying pan, crush some garlic , add olive oil and butter,
salt and pepper, saute for 45 seconds.....lift and spoon some fresh boiled pasta into the pan and toss . Put this on a large platter and ladle some gravy onto it...
grate some fresh pecorino or parmesan regiano or both....
Well, there must be 300,000 recipies for a good gravy. This isn't half bad.
Of course, you can play with the amounts of ingredients...more tomato etc.
But the technique remains , and will be rewarded.
Bon Appetit Mon amis!

Daniel

danscope
2008-Jul-30, 05:08 PM
Gosh!!! They must be eating again!!! :)

Dan

danscope
2008-Jul-30, 11:36 PM
Bump!!!!! :)

turbo-1
2008-Jul-31, 12:14 AM
My wife had to do some shopping tonight, so she came home a bit late, and I made (the quick and easy) supper. Onions sauteed in butter, Applegate farm organic hot dogs, fried buttered rolls, etc. Condiments included my home-made habanero relish and Farmers brand hot beer mustard made with horseradish. Killer, as always.

mugaliens
2008-Jul-31, 12:17 AM
Ah, that's what you meant by "foodie." I gues I'm a foodie. My cupboards are slim, but when I cook for others they usually want seconds. I guess that's a good sign.

danscope
2008-Jul-31, 01:09 AM
Yep, That's it. Good food made better by yourself. Lots of compulsive
tradition and a dash of love......voila! This is real chemistry !!!

Best regards, Dan

ginnie
2008-Jul-31, 02:18 AM
Hi Ginnie,

You asked about a nice gravy.

I use two large cans of tomatoes, one crushed , and one whole,peeled
italian plum tomatoes.....( crush them with your clean hands ..this works.)
I heat these up in a microwave oven . Gets them to temperature without
burning them. This is good. ( Cover them please )

I have a vegetable juicer. You see them in yard sales for $5 . They are superb for juicing carrots. I take about 5 carrots and run them through the juicer. Save the pulp! Save the juice!.

Saute the onions ( one large...or two medium...)
Fine chop some celery....( I run some through the juicer myself )
In a large stirfry wok...no-stick....I saute the onions in olive oil and butter
add the carrot pulp, and half a can of tomato paste , and some fine crushed garlic..(near the end..2 minutes is plenty of time for the garlic. Burned garlic is not a good thing at all)...salt and pepper....and oregano..and basil. Stir this with a silicon spatula....these do not scratch the pan and get all the product off the bottom as you cook. Keep stiring this mixture without fail. It developes many good flavours ...so long as it does not burn. 5 minutes...? When done, add the hot tomatoes.Add the carrot juice. Rinse the cans with a little hot water(1/2 cup and add. Be carefull. Gloves are good. Aprons are very good. In a BEEEG pot (SS ) stainless steel ...
put some olive oil in bottom...medium heat.

NOTE: My wok is large , so I can handle assembly in that. If it is easier for you, combine the ingredients ,once cooked, in the large (Beeg ) pot.
Comebine all ingedients in there . Reduce heat to simmer when it bubbles.
Cover. Set timer. Stir 5 minutes later. Keep watching and stirring .
Your nose will tell you when you are done. You can thin the gravy with a little chicken stock if you like. Yes,...you can stir and talk on the phone.
If children interrupt, turn down the heat to almost nothing and set timer for 5 minutes. THIS WORKS. Forgotten Gravy seldom saves. Scortched gravy is unsalvageable. Trust me. You never need a lot of heat to cook this. You need time and care. It is....quite simple, really.
A little celery salt, and fresh cracked pepper . FRESH BASIL? JOY!
When a gravy is up to temperature, it does not require a great deal of heat at all. Your pan makes a difference. A heavy bottom pan is golden.
NEVER USE ALLUMINUM !!!!!!! THE acid in the tomato attacks the metal .
This is not good. Really not good. Porcelin lined cast iron is good too.
Bring lots of money...$140 .

The secret here is that the fine grated carrots and celery give the gravy a nice, fine texture , is less watery, and welcomes items like pizza ,
fried eggplant, oven roasted meat balls, last night's left over porkchop,
well....take it your way.
You should have it pretty well done in an hour.
You can simmer a gravy in a double boiler for hours if you want to or covered in a slow cooker....BUT.....to tell the truth, the vitamins are going south. Once it is cooked, you can cool it off and refrigerate in glass or stainless steel. And it is always better tommorrow.

There is no need to add sugar. The carrots introduce enough of a sweetening agent. Besides...sugar can and often burns on the bottom.
There's a limit to how much salt you really need in a gravy.
A little garlic is a nice thing.
A little fresh cracked pepper is better than pre-ground 2 year old pepper.
TRY some fresh herbs . They are an illumination.
A little fresh snipped basil when served is often appreciated.

Perhaps some fresh basil foccacia on the table.....with a little onion in it..
Ah..... simmer some braciole in the gravy... or some meat balls...or grilled
sausage... and some shells or spaghetti .
Yea......take a large frying pan, crush some garlic , add olive oil and butter,
salt and pepper, saute for 45 seconds.....lift and spoon some fresh boiled pasta into the pan and toss . Put this on a large platter and ladle some gravy onto it...
grate some fresh pecorino or parmesan regiano or both....
Well, there must be 300,000 recipies for a good gravy. This isn't half bad.
Of course, you can play with the amounts of ingredients...more tomato etc.
But the technique remains , and will be rewarded.
Bon Appetit Mon amis!

Daniel
Merci Beaucoups!
This is more of a sauce, isn't it?
Well, I guess gravy is a sauce anyway.

Lately, I've been making sauces just by adding cream or milk.
e.g. onions, olive oil, garlic, salt, ground pepper, some herbs + MILK.
or onions, butter, garlic, salt, ground pepper, cheese + MILK
or Vegetable paste, shredded carrot, butter, onions, peppers + MILK
You get the idea.
Sometimes, with a homemade pasta sauce I use chunks of green peppers if I don't have any meat. The trick is not to overcook the peppers, you want them kind of crispy.

Fazor
2008-Jul-31, 04:33 AM
Lately, I've been making sauces just by adding cream or milk.
e.g. onions, olive oil, garlic, salt, ground pepper, some herbs + MILK.
or onions, butter, garlic, salt, ground pepper, cheese + MILK
or Vegetable paste, shredded carrot, butter, onions, peppers + MILK
You get the idea.


Butter works as a thickening agent aswell; more effective (IMHO) but also less healthy.

mahesh
2008-Jul-31, 08:54 AM
I may have mentioned in another thread that I have a foodie blog somewhere offsite...

So who else here takes more than a "normal" interest in food?
And of course, do you have any recipes to recommend?
........
I enjoy cooking . Over time I'll share a few recipies you'll probably like....
including......Rave reviews PIZZA ....a revelation .

A quite good Italian gravy (Tomato gravy made good and easy )......
Ask me what you want . Recipies shall be forth comming.

Best regards, Danoh wow....yummy thread...thanks jokergirl...thanks dan...(and thanks sarongsong for back-connect..)

could you show me the colour of your pizzas, please, dan...

jokergirl
2008-Jul-31, 10:30 AM
http://joker.mirar.org/bento/pizza1.jpg

The color of my pizzas...

Homemade bottom made from half of my rising ciabatta dough, tomato gravy with lots of herbs, mozarella cheese, feta cubes, olives, sundried tomatoes and pickled bell peppers... then topped with fresh rucola and basil when it comes out of the oven. Need I say more?

I'm not very fond of cream- or milkbased sauces, I prefer tomato or olive oil. Except when it comes to seafood. Mmm... saffron cream and prawns... or mare e monti...

;)

Swift
2008-Jul-31, 01:09 PM
This is more of a sauce, isn't it?
Well, I guess gravy is a sauce anyway.

When it comes to the tomato-based Italians ones, at least in the US, the two terms, gravy or sauce, seem to be used fairly interchangably. Amongst various Italian-American friends I've had, certain families call it gravy and certain one call it sauce, and it doesn't seem dependent upon recipe.

danscope
2008-Jul-31, 05:59 PM
Merci Beaucoups!
This is more of a sauce, isn't it?
Well, I guess gravy is a sauce anyway.

Lately, I've been making sauces just by adding cream or milk.
e.g. onions, olive oil, garlic, salt, ground pepper, some herbs + MILK.
or onions, butter, garlic, salt, ground pepper, cheese + MILK
or Vegetable paste, shredded carrot, butter, onions, peppers + MILK
You get the idea.
Sometimes, with a homemade pasta sauce I use chunks of green peppers if I don't have any meat. The trick is not to overcook the peppers, you want them kind of crispy.
*******************
Hi, I have many friends, and my Italian friends educated me on the fact that it" Is a gravy". They are emphatic about this. :)

From the basic recipie I gave you, you can spring board many ways.

Layer a bunch of fried eggplant slices with a little grated parm, some mozzerella, more gravy ,fresh basil,etc. Kind of like an eggplant Lasagna.
Spread a little ricotta...doesn't hurt.
Take some pizza dough and spread gravy on part of it, some sauted
spinach, onion, olives, a few meat ball slices...with a little gravy..
some pecorino , a little black pepper, maybe some fresh basil;
fold it over and crimp the edge....fantastic calzone. Bake it at 400° for
ten minutes or so.

Make a soup. A little gravy falls into it...not bad.

Have fun.

Best regards, Dan

crosscountry
2008-Jul-31, 07:02 PM
I cook a lot. This thread (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/69717-post-your-dinner.html) and many before it have been dedicated to food.

mahesh
2008-Jul-31, 07:08 PM
http://joker.mirar.org/bento/pizza1.jpg

The color of my pizzas.......Need I say more?

;)
hmmm, yummers...
aaabsolutely scrrrumptious, jokergirl...
thanks

mike alexander
2008-Jul-31, 08:29 PM
That pizza looks good!

If time is short I'll stop by Little Caesar's on the way home. They're a good buy for $5, just reheat on a stone in the oven to firm them up.

I do prefer homemade, because so much prepared food is so salty. I make pizza dough in the bread machine and freeze the dough. Thaws fast and works quite well (this weekend it'll be sourdough).

What we like best is crisp, so I put the rolled dough on the stone in the oven for about 3-5 min before adding toppings. Chopped drained Roma tomatoes with lots of oregano and garlic, coarse-sliced Crimini mushrooms, over thin slices of skim mozzarella.

I like it because the taste is more sweet than salty, and my fingers don't swell up later.

crosscountry
2008-Jul-31, 09:19 PM
good stuff. why skim cheese?

mike alexander
2008-Jul-31, 10:36 PM
Why skim cheese? My wife hates the pools of fat from melted cheese. And the result is really light and fresh tasting.

danscope
2008-Aug-01, 03:28 AM
oh wow....yummy thread...thanks jokergirl...thanks dan...(and thanks sarongsong for back-connect..)

could you show me the colour of your pizzas, please, dan...

Hi, I'll take a picture next time. We had a party this spring. A bunch of teachers from all over went to the party with a pizza from their local shop.

I brought some dough and my pan and baked a pizza on site.
"The Winner " !! Later, we made some foccacia with the left over dough ...
which was greedily gobbled up . So.....what's the difference?

I start my dough in an insulated plastic or insulated Stainless steel coffee
cup, at least 12 oz. I pre-heat the cup with hot water. I grind up some garlic, add some oregano, dried basil,
some celery salt. I empty the cup, and run my thermometer (taylor quick read type probe ) untill the temperature reads 106° . Put enough water to make as much dough as you need . I usually use about 10 oz. of 106°temp
water. Add 1 tsp of sugar and 1 tsp of honey. The yeast love this!!!
The water has come down to aproximately 105° now. Stir in garlic,
olive oil, oregano, basil , celery salt. Get your long plastic spoon ready.
Stir in the yeast continuously for about 30 seconds.

I buy my yeast in a one lb. bag at BJ's. I put it into a plastic bag
which gets saved in a tupper ware container of that size, with a clothes pin on the bag. The air gets removed, bag twisted, and clothes pin attatched.
Cover goes on....sleeps in the back.
This gets refrigerated....always. My yeast keeps well for a year. I always have yeast. I don't leave it on the counter. I use it and return it now..to the refrigerator. This works.

Now, The yeast -water- herb mixture is covered by the coffee cup cover
which has a small hole in the top for sipping coffee. Inside of ten minutes or so, the yeast water will have " Proofed ". This is a simple process, but it yields a great dough which rises reliably.
In the meantime, I warm up the great mixing bowl. This is a kitchen-aid mixer, and it is 'the tool' for making dough. I put the dough hook in the warm water to warm up. When I start making the dough, it has a good chance of
staying warm (not hot...but a welcomed temperature for the yeast. )
Well,.....it's like welcoming the yeast to the Ritz Hotel !!!! They feed on the honey first....(it's already pre-digested by the bees and easilly does the job ....speeding the process as well.)
The yeast water already has "SOME FLAVOUR "...in a big way.
Once the foam starts to erupt from the sip-top, you are ready to make
some of the best, tasiest dough .
By the way: I oil the dough hook at the top, and the flange(underneath) so that the dough doesn't climb up the dough hook. This works.
Now, empty the great bowl, introduce the yeast water, put on the warm dough hook and put in about 2 cups of flour, set the mixer on medium, and watch the hook incorporate the flour/water. Add flour by the cup full. If you are mixing too fast, the mixer will show you by ejecting flour. This is not good. Slow down a little. As the dough starts to get sticky, add flour....1/2 cup or
gradually less at a time...waiting maybe 30 seconds at a time untill that flour is incorporated....untill the dough eventually cleans the side of the bowl.
Hae a bowl or two handy ....warm ceramic or glass bowls, for the dough to rise in. Spray some olive oil inside the bowl or wipe it with a napkin.
Now.......PAY ATTENTION! Dump out the dough onto a floured counter,
or a nice big wooden cutting board....a beeeeeg one. If the board has a strip screwed onto the bottom ( close to your counter edge ) it will stay put when you knead the dough. You might try some of that stay-put shelving material.
That stuff works well. So....take the flour and get some on your clean hands. Everything is clean....right? Clean is a good thing. You might even
wear a bandana to keep any stray hair from falling into what should be a good product. Say no more...nudge...nudge..!
Take the dough, and dust it with some flour. I have a flour shaker. I keep it in a clear plastic jar. It shakes flour and lives in the jar. This works.
Take the edge of the dough away from you and pul it over the dough, and take the heal of your hand and push the dough, Take the right side and fold it over and turn the dough and push again. Do this maybe ten to 15 time.
Now, take the dough ( divide it if you have that much ) and knead the smaller pieces. (Another 5 times). Now....take a ball of dough and make a ball
out of it. Then...imagine that it is a berret....a french hat ! You are looking at the top of the hat. Take the berret and turn the bottom edges underneath,
making the top of the hat bulge as you keep turning the edges in with your fingers. This stretches the top and seals the dough, and the gas generated by the yeast . Now, pinch and seal the bottom together, and rotate the hat on the board, sliding your fingers karate style under the edge of the dough.
You should have a nice dough ball ready to drop into the oiled bowl (which is warm...107° say....) . Spray some olive oil onto the dough and cover with a
plastic grocery bag ( a clean bag). Good, cheap and it works. Ideally,
this goes into a 100° oven...away from cold drafts . Dough likes this.
Wait for 1/2 hr to an hour. Remove from warm place. Turn out the dough
and form your pizza. You have seen people do the rest. It's not hard.
You want Chicago style, form your dough on a corn meal board, Place the dough into a 1 inch deep pan as big as you require.

You want a great, traditional piza, get an AIRBAKE pizza pan. These are great. I form the dough on my counter with corn meal on the counter.
Once the dough is the size I need, I lift it with my arms and place it onto the great pizza pan. It gets formed a little more. You can turn the edge under all the way around...( this yields a thicker edge...desired by some...) .
Now.....
sprinkle some grated parmesan or pecorino...just some...lightly.
Then, some italian gravy...ah....yes!!! Hey... Prego works too! Spread it evenly...not too sloppy. Everything will slide off the pizza..not really a good idea. Maybe a little more pecorino on the gravy.
Now,
Maybe some mozzerella ...good stuff...not too much.
roasted red peppers, or
cooked chicken and a little gorgonzola or blue cheese , or.....
maybe some sliced meat ballls ,
some sauted onions,
sauted italian sweet sausage, lightly chopped,
or.....some nice anchovies ( freshly opened can ....you cannot save these... open them ...use them. This is a law.)
Bake at 425 ° or hotter if you pay attention ! I encourage you to
PAY ATTENTION!!!! You have done the work. Why not reap the rewards??
Three minutes before the pizza is finished, I put the delicate things on...
pepperoni. maybe some more grated parm or pecorino .

Pizza is usually done in 7 to 12 minutes, depending on how hot your oven is. Some pizzas are blasted at 600 ° . Wood fired ovens are a trip.
When the pizza comes out, a little fresh cracked pepper, maybe some fresh snipped basil . And a nice wine..or beer.. or perhaps some
Woodchuck pear cider on a hot summer's day.
How about a fine ginger beer? Even a great glass of cool water taste
good with this.

By now the aroma should be waking up your friends.
I hope this treatise works well for you.

This dough makes a nice loaf of bread.... or rolls.....or calzone...
or garlic bread.... get creative.

It is easier to make than it is to describe. :)

Best regards, and Bon Appetit !!
Dan

danscope
2008-Aug-03, 01:21 PM
Well, we're off for the Chester , Massachusetts "Blueberry Festival ".
A good time will be had by all....+ pick your own Blueberries, 5 varietals.
Blueberrie wine, icecream, pie, muffins...etc.
Unnnn..doggies . Jed would like this. :)

Dan

geonuc
2008-Aug-03, 01:56 PM
Pizza last night.

ETA: wrong thread, I think. Moved it to here:
http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/69717-post-your-dinner-13.html

mahesh
2008-Aug-03, 02:18 PM
Hi, I'll take a picture next time. We had a party this spring. A bunch of teachers from all over went to the party with a pizza from their local shop.

I brought some dough and my pan and baked a pizza on site.
"The Winner " !! Later, we made some foccacia with the left over dough ...
which was greedily gobbled up . So.....what's the difference?

........
By now the aroma should be waking up your friends.
I hope this treatise works well for you.

This dough makes a nice loaf of bread.... or rolls.....or calzone...
or garlic bread.... get creative.

It is easier to make than it is to describe. :)

Best regards, and Bon Appetit !!
Dan

Thanks Dan for your nice description / treatise...as you say...
you know that i meant asking for your recipe, for your pizzas, not literally, a photograph :)

i am not surprised, you came out the winner at your party. commercial stuff can't beat home made stuff. specially as one puts in some love, that special ingredient, not available in any market in the world.

yeah, i use fresh yeast as well, always. but make all dough by hand. elbowgrease and love...the arms ache. it's tremendous fun. the whole process. and the results disappear soooo fast.

thanks, Dan. it's nice reading your stuff. may be you should consider putting together a book. keeping the expressive / natural style.

have a good time at the festival.

best regards
mahesh

mahesh
2008-Aug-03, 02:37 PM
Pizza last night.

ETA: wrong thread, I think. Moved it to here:
http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/69717-post-your-dinner-13.html

geonuc, hi....nice pizza!

on the one hand i think, maybe the two threads should be merged.
on the other, i think not.

crosscountry started the PYD thread yonks ago and shows the end results.

jokergirl started this thread and consists of the process.

maybe we should ask crosscountry & jokergirl? :D

crosscountry
2008-Aug-03, 06:37 PM
she cooks and I eat :D Or I can cook. :D

crosscountry
2008-Aug-03, 06:38 PM
geonuc, hi....nice pizza!

crosscountry started the PYD thread yonks ago and shows the end results.




actually that thread is about the 5th reincarnation. Each one before that fell off the face of Baut and is somewhere in the depths of all those pages.

Kaptain K
2008-Aug-03, 07:11 PM
I cook. I eat. Anybody who's met me can tell I'm fairly good at both! :)

Neverfly
2008-Aug-03, 07:58 PM
I cook. I eat. Anybody who's met me can tell I'm fairly good at both! :)

I can vouch that you're good at eating...

danscope
2008-Aug-04, 02:05 AM
Thanks Dan for your nice description / treatise...as you say...
you know that i meant asking for your recipe, for your pizzas, not literally, a photograph :)

i am not surprised, you came out the winner at your party. commercial stuff can't beat home made stuff. specially as one puts in some love, that special ingredient, not available in any market in the world.

yeah, i use fresh yeast as well, always. but make all dough by hand. elbowgrease and love...the arms ache. it's tremendous fun. the whole process. and the results disappear soooo fast.

thanks, Dan. it's nice reading your stuff. may be you should consider putting together a book. keeping the expressive / natural style.

have a good time at the festival.

best regards
mahesh

********************
Hi, Thanks for the reply.

And thanks for the encouragment! I have thought of this. I could ....
"Use the 'dough' " . :)
I am happy that you enjoyed my writing style. I think , for many, that
the expressive recipie with the complete decription of how, including what's going on....is instructive for so many people, and helps them to understand
"WHY " we do things the way we do....and the results we get.

I hope you enjoy your superlative dough. Hand kneading is great.
You can feel what you are doing.
A great book on this is the Tassajara Bread Book, which I first came across in the old Whole Earth Catalog.....circa 1970. Quite the book on bread
and the art . Check it out.

Best regards, Dan

jokergirl
2008-Aug-04, 08:27 AM
I did some lovely ciabattas on Saturday.

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/ciabattas.jpg

I like them just with some olive oil and salt, or possibly to a caprese with buffalo mozarella, gardenfresh tomatoes, basil and nice aged balsamico vinegar.

Any other ideas? (Vegetarian preferred)

Also, how is the status on locally-grown and/or organic food where you live? There is sadly few locally-grown stuff to be had here (Sweden doesn't really do farmer's markets) but the organic vegetables are a LOT better than the normal ones. When I was home in Austria over the vacation, I tried their organic vegetables from the supermarket which weren't as good at all. On the other hand, they have farmer's markets which are PHANTASTIC.

;)

Fazor
2008-Aug-04, 01:24 PM
... but the organic vegetables are a LOT better than the normal ones. When I was home in Austria over the vacation, I tried their organic vegetables from the supermarket which weren't as good at all. On the other hand, they have farmer's markets which are PHANTASTIC.
;)

I know I stated this in a prior thread and the BAUT community wildly disagreed with me, but I hate the term "organic" for naturally grown foods. If you're going to pick a word to describe your product, IMHO you should pick one that doesn't describe what you're trying to differentiate yourself from equally well.

Ivan Viehoff
2008-Aug-04, 02:43 PM
zuchinni (marrow to the Brits)
Actually "courgette" is English for "zucchini". "Marrow" is the unfortunate result of not picking your courgette soon enough.

Erm, I only eat Brie and Camembert if they are unpasteurised (an option I suspect is unavailable in North America). I make my own pizza dough. I refuse to buy sausages/ham/bacon that contain polyphosphates. I roast my own coffee beans (in a modified popcorn popper). Only Japanese soy sauce is purchased. Soft drinks of a chemical nature (coke etc) are not admitted to the house. I made my own skyr (from some brought back from Iceland) for about 6 months until the culture died. I prefer free range meat. Etc.

Does that make me a foody, or just - as my wife has it - a fusspot?

jokergirl
2008-Aug-04, 03:55 PM
I know I stated this in a prior thread and the BAUT community wildly disagreed with me, but I hate the term "organic" for naturally grown foods. If you're going to pick a word to describe your product, IMHO you should pick one that doesn't describe what you're trying to differentiate yourself from equally well.

Try some other languages; in German it's called "bio" (from biologically grown) and in Swedish "eko" (from ecologically grown). :doh:

I hate the word as much as you do. Seriously, how hard can it be?

Ivan, that depends on whether you really enjoy it or if you're just doing it for something to nag about. :lol:

;)

geonuc
2008-Aug-04, 03:59 PM
Does that make me a foody, or just - as my wife has it - a fusspot?
Foodie. Not necessarily, but probably you are one.

danscope
2008-Aug-04, 08:12 PM
Hi, I don't mind the term " Organic " , but I am troubled and deeply resentfull
of flimflam artists who print organic on anything to get more money for
what , if we really knew what it is and where it came from....is crap.
The real and genuine item is worthwhile to many who can afford it ,
and are willing to buy un-troubled produce etc.

What we lack is official documentation....that means something.

Just spare us from the Con-artists.

Dan

danscope
2008-Aug-04, 08:13 PM
Hi,

mahesh
2008-Aug-05, 01:33 AM
I did some lovely ciabattas on Saturday.

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/ciabattas.jpg

................
;)
gosh, you are such a tease, jokergirl!

jokergirl
2008-Aug-05, 09:02 AM
gosh, you are such a tease, jokergirl!

Why yes, I am!

Here in Sweden, there is actually an organic certification for most wares that want to be sold as "organic". It's called "Krav" and it's pretty hard to obtain and keep up.
Similar to the Fairtrade mark, a pretty good idea.

;)

mahesh
2008-Aug-22, 12:22 PM
...A great book on this is the Tassajara Bread Book, which I first came across in the old Whole Earth Catalog.....circa 1970. Quite the book on bread and the art . Check it out.....
Hi danscope!

thanks for the tip....Tassajara....eventually i checked it out...
it's like a goldmine...and their books are extremely reasonably priced too!

thanks again, dan

i was in the park, 'walking' our pet, Tallulah, this morning and thought to make her 'her cookies', instead of buying commercial stuff from petshops...she loves the same cookies we do anyway, excepting chocolate, but we can't share with her friends, as some pet-owners have reservations about 'wheat' .......
i'll include some 'doggie' ingredients and 'bone' shapes etc., this weekend!

danscope
2008-Aug-22, 05:36 PM
Hi Mahesh,
Thanks for the reply.
Doggies are people too. Ask them! :)
There will seldom be a product to compete with the well made home-made
doggie cookie. Research, care and attention to detail is hard to compete with.

Books like Tassajarra are a treasure, and a joy always.
Undilluted knowledge is a joy forever! May it serve you well.
Best regards, Dan

mahesh
2008-Oct-16, 03:58 PM
on logging-out, the last message i see on the screen says:

vBulletin Message

All cookies cleared!

Return to the page you were previously viewing
Go to forums index


well, shouldn't it say "all cookies cleared ...by mahesh and Lullie"? :shifty:
Mr Cain, are you there? :D

jokergirl
2008-Oct-17, 12:40 PM
Mmmm... cookies.

*munch munch*

I'm for some gingerbread, what do you take?

;)

Swift
2008-Oct-17, 12:49 PM
Anything I can get, as long as it doesn't have coconut. But I particularly like fruit and jam type cookies.

mahesh
2008-Oct-17, 12:59 PM
Mmmm... cookies.

*munch munch*

I'm for some gingerbread, what do you take?

;)

chocolate chip, preferably, for me.
and plain, for Lullie, my pussycat of a dawg!

edit:
...but i'm game, to clearing up all cookies. Lullie is not allowed chocolate. She can help me with the others.

PraedSt
2008-Oct-17, 01:07 PM
Mmmm... cookies

I love cookies. Especially because whenever I think of them, this guy pops into my head:


http://www.sweetblogomine.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/04/18/cookiemonster.jpg

Abbadon_2008
2008-Oct-17, 01:42 PM
Food is good.

Though I love 'healthy' food -- fruit and nuts and yogurt and cereal, etc... -- it's hard to kick the pasta habit.

Man, I could eat pasta almost daily, various types and flavors. I guess I'm lucky I don't live in Italy. Otherwise, I'd be dead in a year.

mahesh
2008-Oct-17, 01:55 PM
...pasta it!

Parrothead
2008-Oct-17, 03:21 PM
That picture of pizza made me hungry. Later, I think I'll bake a few loaves of rosemary bread and once again use a portion of that dough, as a pizza base. I may have a go at baking some homemade knäckebröd (crisp bread), over the weekend.

I watch a number of food shows and will try recipes that interest me. I'll follow the recipe the first time and play with changes afterwards. I've taken a baking and pastry arts course. I stick more to baking breads, coffeebreads, pastries, pies, cookies, etc.

I've probably stated before in other threads, the book I keep closest to hand in the kitchen, is this one (http://www.chefbo.com/) (third edition). It was on the reccommended list, when I took the baking course and it was well worth the $80 it cost me.

mahesh
2008-Oct-17, 03:38 PM
talking about foodie-ism, Parrothead, is that your real location, or did you say cheese and make it up?

nice link, thanks.

Delvo
2008-Oct-17, 03:42 PM
I just discovered the world's best treatment of fish last night (catfish, but I expect it would be just as wonderful for other white fish, just not tuna or salmon)...

5-6 minutes on a George Foreman grill with onion salt and... cinnamon!

geonuc
2008-Oct-17, 04:10 PM
I'm for some gingerbread, what do you take?

;)
I'm an equal-opportunity cookie eater. Just about any cookie will do.

I love cookies.

Swift
2008-Oct-17, 05:29 PM
Speaking of cookies.....

Most restaurants, at least in the states, seem to serve huge desserts. I don't know about you, but after a big meal, I don't want a piece of cheesecake the size of my head. I've thought it would be a good idea for them to serve small desserts, like a plate of cookies (or even a single cookie or two). That way, if you just wanted a little something, you had an option. It would also mean more sales, since if the choice is huge or nothing, I usually pick nothing.

I have seen this in a couple of restaurants, but it seems to be uncommon.

geonuc
2008-Oct-17, 06:17 PM
I agree - most desserts you get in US restaurants are big enough to gag a horse.

Although I dined in a nice tapas place in Atlanta this week (Pura Vida (http://www.puravidatapas.com/)) and we ordered two desserts (there were three of us). Both were reasonably sized, but that may reflect the small-plates nature of the restaurant.

jokergirl
2008-Oct-18, 01:16 PM
I love cookies. Especially because whenever I think of them, this guy pops into my head:


http://www.sweetblogomine.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/04/18/cookiemonster.jpg

http://joker.mirar.org/P?loc=fotojunk/cookie_monster_slayer_cosplay.jpg&get=m

I just made some delicious raspberry-almond muffins, 1/3 wholewheat flour, with crushed almonds in the dough and almond splinters on the side.
Mmm... soon, soon they'll be done...

;)

PS: Photo's not me, nor mine.

geonuc
2008-Oct-18, 01:23 PM
Yikes!

Uh, did I say I like cookies? No, no. I meant I hate cookies. Yes, that's it.

Neverfly
2008-Oct-18, 01:26 PM
PS: Photo's not me, nor mine.

Good thing you pointed that out.

I was Sooo gonna offer to be your cookie...

PraedSt
2008-Oct-18, 01:44 PM
Lol. At least my cookies are now safe.
Of course that girl deserves to be nagged by Miss Piggy for all eternity...

geonuc
2008-Oct-18, 02:14 PM
Just to be sure the cookie monster killing girl doesn't come after me, I'll post about something completely different.

My garden has been a bit of a disappointment this year. The tomatoes have mainly served to fatten the squirrels and some of my chile plants have not done well. But here's what I have managed to grow in the way of chiles:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3250/2951813708_39b91362c9.jpg?v=0

CW from top left:
cherry hot (medium)
serrano (hot)
poblano (mild) - not a good specimen
red savina habanero (screaming hot)
wild brazil tepin (fairly hot)
scotch bonnet (screaming hot)

jokergirl
2008-Oct-18, 03:58 PM
Ohhh, nice harvest!
I could really use some Habañeros - I keep hearing how deliciously hot they are, yet the ones you get here are barely spicy.

I have a picture of my harvest of bird chilies somewhere as well, but since I can't find it right now, you'll get a picture of today's muffins instead:

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/raspberry_muffins.jpg

;)

PraedSt
2008-Oct-18, 04:17 PM
I'm surrounded by gardeners. Sadly, I'm an uncivilised apartment dweller. But yeah, good harvest geonuc.
As for your squirrels, I've heard that being sneaky and fattening them up with nuts works. But I don't know how true that is; it's quite hard to out-sneak a squirrel.

geonuc
2008-Oct-26, 01:22 PM
As I prepare some hot wings (not Buffalo wings), I am reminded of the debates that often ensue on food forums and other foodie circles about authenticity. By that, I mean whether a dish or food is authentic.

In the US, certain foods provoke this discussion quite easily. With hot wings, those from the Buffalo, NY region will usually pipe up and assert that wings must be in the style popularized by the Anchor Bar and no other will do, ignoring or discounting the difference between hot wings and Buffalo wings. Bar-B-Que is another. We have three or four dominant styles of cooking smoked meat and if you claim yours as prepared in one of those styles, well, it had better be authentic or you'll hear about it. Pizza, too. Just ask a New Yorker about pizza.

We have a lot of ethnic restaurants in Atlanta (yea!!), and people get into a lot of debate about them, too. Is this authentic Sichuan food, or has it been altered to suit American tastes and available ingredients (not talking about American-Chinese food, but rather Chinese-Chinese food)?

The debates can get quite heated. For myself, I do like to try truely authentic cuisine, but I don't insist on it. Food is amenable to regional changes and improvements. Some authentic food is just bad, after all. Taking influences from other regions to make it tastier is, as Martha Stewart would say, a good thing. That's what chefs do.

What do you think? Do certain foods need to be authentic or you won't like it, even if it's tasty? Is this solely an American phenomenon or are foodies from other parts of the world wrapped up in similar authenticity debates?

PraedSt
2008-Oct-27, 08:45 AM
Well, in my experience, foreign food usually gets altered to suit local tastes. A wise thing perhaps: they do have to sell the stuff!
Personally, I don't mind too much. I'm definitely in the 'as long as it tastes good, I'll eat it' camp. The uncultured camp, I'm sure some would say. :D

ravens_cry
2008-Oct-27, 10:13 AM
I can think of only a few things I have tried and didn't like. One was fried calamari. It wasn't the flavor, it was the lack. Just fried chew,and not much of that. Oh well.
One thing I have found is real good with a good barbeque burger (beef or chicken) is peanut only peanut butter. ANother tasty treat, in my view, is to put a thin slice of hamon topof the cheese when your making cheesebugers. Keeps the chese melty, and adds a taste all its own.

BigDon
2008-Oct-27, 02:43 PM
I can think of only a few things I have tried and didn't like. One was fried calamari. It wasn't the flavor, it was the lack. Just fried chew,and not much of that. Oh well.

:eek:

Oh you poor guy! You got robbed! Oh man, I remember the fabulous calimari steaks served at the now closed Spanger's Seafood Restarant in Berkeley California. No tenticles or beaks and it covered your plate.

Or the spicey calimari at Di Napoli's down the street. Very tasty but tends to transit through your processes rather rapidly.

turbo-1
2008-Oct-27, 04:38 PM
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/habanerorelish003.jpg

Chili relish is drop-dead easy to make, and you can use any type of chilies from mild to hot. Here is a shot of some habanero relish in the making. The yellow-green stuff on the chopping surface is dill florets - the tiny yellow flowers of the dill plant. The flavor is richer than that of the dill weed. The garlic is home-grown Russian garlic (purplish bulbs) and the habanero chilies came out of my garden, too.

To make chili relish, simply chop the peppers (whole, with the seeds and placentas intact) and garlic in a food processor. Transfer to a stainless pan and add chopped dill of some kind. Dill weed is OK, but if you grow your own and can get the flowering heads, you'll be happier. Pour in enough cider vinegar to cover the chopped ingredients, measuring it out cup by cup. For every cup of vinegar you needed, add one tsp of canning salt, one tsp of sugar, and one tbsp of molasses. Simmer until the chilies are softened, and you're done. The tastiest relish I have made was this summer's batch with equal parts Hungarian wax chilies, jalapenos, and cayenne chilies, and lots of Russian garlic. I put up over 30 jars of that, including several quart-sized jars. Good thing, because we're using it up at an alarming rate.

You can store the relish in the refrigerator, or if you make large batches like I do, you can process the relish in canning jars. I process the jars in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes. If you have never canned before, please get a book on the subject and learn how to do it properly. Listeria and botulism are not good things.

Here is a shot of one of my cupboards with chili relishes, hot tomato-based salsas, and pickles. This is less than 1/4 of the the stuff I typically can every summer/fall.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/smallcupboard.jpg

Jay200MPH
2008-Oct-27, 05:44 PM
Here's one I've never done before. So the other day I really felt like some ice cream. Now, seeing as I didn't have a single dairy product to my name at the time, you'd think I'd have been out of luck. But...

http://www.bautforum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=8929&stc=1&d=1225128987

The above was made with most of one can of coconut milk, half a ripe mango, and a few teaspoons of sugar. Blended it all smooth and then froze it in a thick ceramic bowl, covered with plastic wrap. I took it out and stirred it every half-hour or so until the consistincy was right. Turned out perfect.

- J

BigDon
2008-Oct-27, 06:44 PM
Turbo, my mother adapted a similar recipe for bell peppers to the rocotos I mentioned in the other thread.

Try putting in a couple of segments of carrot as well. Acts like "tofu" in that the carrots pick up the heat and flavors nicely. Several Mexican delis where I live sell pints of pickled peppers with carrot in them and I always eat the carrots out of it first.

geonuc
2008-Oct-27, 09:54 PM
That's a large pile of habaneros, turbo. You say you go through the hungarian/jalapeno/cayenne relish fairly quickly? You've got some chile-heads in residence. How long will the habanero relish last? I can't imagine many people will touch it.

geonuc
2008-Oct-27, 09:55 PM
The above was made with most of one can of coconut milk, half a ripe mango, and a few teaspoons of sugar. Blended it all smooth and then froze it in a thick ceramic bowl, covered with plastic wrap. I took it out and stirred it every half-hour or so until the consistincy was right. Turned out perfect.

- J
Nice. :)

ravens_cry
2008-Oct-27, 10:00 PM
:eek:

Oh you poor guy! You got robbed! Oh man, I remember the fabulous calimari steaks served at the now closed Spanger's Seafood Restarant in Berkeley California. No tenticles or beaks and it covered your plate.

Or the spicey calimari at Di Napoli's down the street. Very tasty but tends to transit through your processes rather rapidly.
I hope to get a chance to try some GOOD calamari then.

jokergirl
2008-Oct-28, 06:47 AM
Ohhh, those relishes look delicious.
I'd offer to take a few jars off your hands, but I kind of assume they wouldn't survive mailing to Europe... and then you'd probably have some terrorism charges on your hands, mailing biological weaponry.

I might offer a trade instead: Care to mail me some seeds of those fantastic-looking Habañeros? I could send some of my various chili sorts back in exchange:

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/chilies1.jpg

;)

geonuc
2008-Oct-28, 08:03 AM
What do you think? Do certain foods need to be authentic or you won't like it, even if it's tasty? Is this solely an American phenomenon or are foodies from other parts of the world wrapped up in similar authenticity debates?
No other opinions?

jokergirl
2008-Oct-28, 02:03 PM
I missed that debate...

Coming from Europe, of course, I may revel in the hubris of laughing at any New Worlder calling their food authentic, of course. :lol: *puts pipe in mouth and tries to look sufficiently sophisticated and blasé*

Generally, I like both Chinese restaurant food and original homemade Chinese food. They're two completely different things, of course, but that doesn't mean I can't enjoy both!

;)

geonuc
2008-Oct-28, 02:38 PM
I missed that debate...

Coming from Europe, of course, I may revel in the hubris of laughing at any New Worlder calling their food authentic, of course. :lol: *puts pipe in mouth and tries to look sufficiently sophisticated and blasé*

Generally, I like both Chinese restaurant food and original homemade Chinese food. They're two completely different things, of course, but that doesn't mean I can't enjoy both!

;)
Harrumph. Well, I guess we colonists do tend to think our four-hundred odd years over here as entitling us to at least some respect. :)

A lot of the authenticity debate centers around non-American food, though, such as Chinese. We have some restaurants that have two menus: American Chinese and authentic Chinese, and if you're not astute enough to ask, you won't get the good stuff. But my question involves just the so-called authentic menu - much of the food still isn't exactly what is served in the homes and restaurants of Sichuan province, for example. But at least you won't find (or shouldn't find) General Tso's chicken on the Chinese menu.

Not that there's anything wrong with General Tso's chicken. :shifty:

turbo-1
2008-Oct-28, 03:53 PM
That's a large pile of habaneros, turbo. You say you go through the hungarian/jalapeno/cayenne relish fairly quickly? You've got some chile-heads in residence. How long will the habanero relish last? I can't imagine many people will touch it.The habanero relish actually lasts pretty well because my wife won't touch it. I always dress my hot dogs with hab relish and hot yellow mustard and (usually) horseradish.

My wife likes the relishes made from our milder chilies so those go rather quickly - especially this summer's batch, when I went crazy with the Russian garlic. I like mixing that 50:50 with ketchup to have with fried potatoes, fried eggs, omelets, etc. The relishes are also very good on cheeseburgers. We use a pint jar in a matter of 2-3 weeks or less.

mahesh
2008-Oct-28, 03:57 PM
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/habanerorelish003.jpg.....
Here is a shot of one of my cupboards with chili relishes, hot tomato-based salsas, and pickles. This is less than 1/4 of the the stuff I typically can every summer/fall.
http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x318/turbo-1/smallcupboard.jpg

makes me wonder if you've considered going 'commercial' with your droolicious pickles, turbo...a la Paul Newman
i remember you showing similarly mouth-watering goodies, last year! oh man. i'm salivatin'.

jokergirl, your trade-off is naughty....in a heads i win, tails you lose way!
bon appétit

turbo-1
2008-Oct-28, 03:58 PM
Ohhh, those relishes look delicious.
I'd offer to take a few jars off your hands, but I kind of assume they wouldn't survive mailing to Europe... and then you'd probably have some terrorism charges on your hands, mailing biological weaponry.

I might offer a trade instead: Care to mail me some seeds of those fantastic-looking Habañeros? I could send some of my various chili sorts back in exchange:

;)
Actually, I eat all the seeds because after removing the stems, the whole peppers go into the food processor. My growing season is too short to start peppers from seeds, but there are a couple of guys with a greenhouse in town, and they know that I want the hottest habanero peppers available, so they start my plants for me and I plant them soon after the danger of frost is past.

Regarding weaponry - when I make a big batch of habanero relish, the air in the kitchen is a bit on the "tingly" side. I love the smell of the simmering relish, but it's best to enjoy from afar and not to take a deep whiff directly over the pot.

turbo-1
2008-Oct-28, 04:05 PM
makes me wonder if you've considered going 'commercial' with your droolicious pickles, turbo...a la Paul Newman
i remember you showing similarly mouth-watering goodies, last year! oh man. i'm salivatin'.

jokergirl, your trade-off is naughty....in a heads i win, tails you lose way!
bon appétitI make pickles for ourselves and give some to family and friends from time to time. I don't think I would enjoy making it into a business, though. That would take the fun out of it.

My favorites from last year's production are dill spears with lots of Russian garlic and super-chilies (I'm sure that's just a trade name, I don't know the variety) - hotter than jalapeno, milder than habanero. We had a cool summer with torrential rains (often 1-2"/day), and my cucumber crop failed. Luckily, I was a pickle-making fool last summer, so we have enough tucked away in cupboards and the pantry to last this year, too.

mahesh
2008-Oct-28, 04:14 PM
I make pickles for ourselves and give some to family and friends from time to time. I don't think I would enjoy making it into a business, though. That would take the fun out of it.
....
i understand what you mean about the fun bit. my mom and dad are pickles-crazy too. they make tons, every year and give a lot away.
i couldn't imagine them going 'commercial' for that very same reason as yourself.

thanks again. i suppose the photographs will have to do, drooling-wise. for now.

geonuc
2008-Nov-01, 12:08 PM
If you have never canned before, please get a book on the subject and learn how to do it properly. Listeria and botulism are not good things.
turbo-1, what can you recommend in the way of a good canning & pickling book? I love pickles and would like to make my own.

.

turbo-1
2008-Nov-01, 02:58 PM
I learned canning and pickling as a child, and don't have any books. You might want to swing by a decent book store and look for canning books by Kerr, Ball, and other companies that make canning jars and lids. That should get you a solid foundation in sterilization, processing, etc. Processing times are generally pH related, and most pickles, and my chili relishes can be processed for 20 minutes in a boiling water bath. Things like carrots, beans, etc must either be processed for much longer or must be processed at higher temperatures in a pressure cooker.

There are recipe books for pickles, and you should look for ones with basic recipes - Kosher dill pickles, bread-and-butter pickles, etc. Start with a basic recipe and spice it up your way. I like to put whole garlic cloves and hot chili peppers in sour pickles. You can experiment with allspice berries, peppercorns, mustard seed, dill, etc. If you have space, plant some dill. The tiny yellow flowers have an incredible flavor.

geonuc
2008-Nov-02, 11:04 AM
Thanks. There's probably some good websites, as well, I would imagine.

After grocery shopping yesterday, I got a little frustrated with the lack of space in my freezer and began digging around in the back. Seems I have three gallon-size bags full of chiles from the garden. :(

geonuc
2008-Nov-03, 08:29 PM
Well, I took steps to solve my freezer space problem. I bought a Foodsaver - one of those vacuum sealing thingies. It's cool. If it didn't waste plastic, I'd be vacuum bagging everything in the house.

Like the cats. :eek:

crosscountry
2008-Nov-04, 02:59 PM
is that plastic expensive? I've thought about those things but really don't keep enough food for long enough to make it valuable really.

geonuc
2008-Nov-04, 03:23 PM
The plastic isn't expensive, I just don't like wasting it and adding excess plastic to the environment. (Like it matters.)

I'm a tree-hugging dirt worshipper.

Swift
2008-Nov-04, 06:06 PM
Well, I took steps to solve my freezer space problem. I bought a Foodsaver - one of those vacuum sealing thingies. It's cool. If it didn't waste plastic, I'd be vacuum bagging everything in the house.

Like the cats. :eek:
Just remember to leave the head sticking out.
http://www.doctordog.com/catbook/1-10cvg.gif

jokergirl
2008-Nov-05, 08:54 AM
Nah, bagging your cats is a waste of plastic.
That is, unless you declaw them first.

;)

sarongsong
2008-Dec-11, 02:43 AM
Chemists define Yorkshire pudding http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif
November 11, 2008
...the Royal Society of Chemistry...has ruled on the acceptable dimensions of the Yorkshire pudding and is now issuing the definitive recipe...
Royal Society of Chemistry (http://www.rsc.org/AboutUs/News/PressReleases/2008/PerfectYorkshire.asp)

geonuc
2008-Dec-11, 09:57 AM
Well, it's about time. All these people who have been making three-and-a-half inch tall pudding shan't be calling it Yorkshire now, will they? :p

danscope
2008-Dec-11, 08:48 PM
Yes....bloody down-sizing. Pretty soon we shall have a hershey bar the size of a stick of gum for a dollar. .....And $4 a pint ice cream. Bah!! Humbug!!!

geonuc
2008-Dec-12, 11:24 AM
I'm worried my foodie credentials may be revoked. I haven't cooked anything at home in two weeks. :(

Swift
2008-Dec-12, 01:39 PM
Have you been eating out at interesting restaurants.... that still counts for CEUs (Continuing Eating Units). If you're eating out of the vending machine... well, we might make you take a re-license course (20 hours of straight Food Network watching).

geonuc
2008-Dec-12, 01:55 PM
Have you been eating out at interesting restaurants.... that still counts for CEUs (Continuing Eating Units). If you're eating out of the vending machine... well, we might make you take a re-license course (20 hours of straight Food Network watching).
I think I have enough CEUs for this year, but I'd better worry about 2009.

I've not even been eating out - just foraging in the freezer and pantry.

Buttercup
2008-Dec-12, 04:47 PM
Oh yeah, I'm a foodie. Like "The Food Channel," often buy food magazines [especially cookies] - even if only to enjoy the pics. Love all kinds of foods, sweet & salty, meat & potatoes.....I could nibble all day, but metabolism won't let me. ;) The only people I truly envy are those who can eat whatever/whenever and stay naturally thin. :( You are *lucky*!

Fazor
2008-Dec-12, 05:09 PM
An idea for a chipotle-inspired tomato soup hit me this morning. I may try to make it over the weekend.

PetersCreek
2008-Dec-12, 08:38 PM
The plastic isn't expensive, I just don't like wasting it and adding excess plastic to the environment. (Like it matters.)

I'm a tree-hugging dirt worshipper.

If you seal with a generous headspace, you can reuse vacuum bags many times. For instance, I clean, boil, and reuse the bags in which I cure Canadian bacon. A whole pork loin is a couple of feet long or so and that'd be a lot of bag to waste after just one use. So, I add a good foot of extra headspace or more so I can trim and reseal it 6 or 8 times, at least.

geonuc
2009-Jan-07, 12:12 PM
This post has no real point - just random musings of a foodie nature.

My favorite grocery store is the Buford Highway Farmers Market here in Atlanta. OK, not Atlanta proper, but in the metro area.

BHFM is an asian/hispanic mega food store, not a real farmer's market. They have an extensive grocery section where you can find just about any asian or american fruit, vegetable, grain or whatever that you need. The meat and fish section is huge as well.

But what I like best (OK, second best - that grocery section is the best) are the many aisles of dried and canned goods. To make things easier on folks and to organize their inventory, the aisles are arranged according to ethnicity - there's a couple of Korean aisles, a couple Japanese, several Mexican, an Indian, Philippino, etc. They recently expanded into eastern European goods too, so they have a lot of stuff from Russia, Poland, Ukraine and the like.

I can spend hours there.

Last weekend, in the Japanese aisle, I found a collection of rice seasonings. They have about ten varieties of this brand:

http://www.amazon.com/JFC-Nori-Komi-Furikake-Seasoning/dp/B0006G5KEY

I bought two. Anyone ever use these? Aside from the obvious rice seasoning application, any other creative uses?

I love food shopping and Atlanta is a foodie paradise.

raffromnewyork
2009-Jan-07, 01:23 PM
I consider myself a foodie as well. Here is a sample of my addiction :

http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f212/rafbak/l_0a9fb7e4e8be612bebacae63890a2fac.jpg

Large steak with wild mushroom sauce, with a bowl of basmati rice and a tomato with chopped onion for a side dish. + ny tap water:P

Fazor
2009-Jan-07, 03:07 PM
I bought two. Anyone ever use these? Aside from the obvious rice seasoning application, any other creative uses?

I love food shopping and Atlanta is a foodie paradise.

I prefer to mix my own seasonings rather than use pre-mixed, as it's more fun. But with pre-mixed (or your own mixed) you can use it for whatever you want. Season a soup/broth. Brush a meat with oil and season before cooking. Use over vegitables or stir-fry. Whatever. If you like the flavor, use it on other things that would be compatable with that flavor. :)

I'd be in trouble at that market. I already love to stalk the ethnic food section when we go shopping, but at our grociery there's only and aisle or two.

I posted in the other thread about the Greek/Mediterrantean dish I concocted over the weekend--my g/f wants it again so I'm making it tonight, except this time with chicken instead of lamb (she won't eat lamb, because they're "cute". IMHO, cute and edible are not necessarily incompatable adjectives).

geonuc
2009-Jan-07, 04:46 PM
I prefer to mix my own seasonings rather than use pre-mixed, as it's more fun. But with pre-mixed (or your own mixed) you can use it for whatever you want. Season a soup/broth. Brush a meat with oil and season before cooking. Use over vegitables or stir-fry. Whatever. If you like the flavor, use it on other things that would be compatable with that flavor.

I'd be in trouble at that market. I already love to stalk the ethnic food section when we go shopping, but at our grociery there's only and aisle or two.


I generally season with my own combinations as well, but these rice seasonings have a lot stuff in them I don't have. Plus, I just wanted to buy them. :D

BHFM, along with being big and droolworthy, is pretty cheap. So, you really have to go wild before you get into too much trouble, money-wise.

mahesh
2009-Jan-07, 05:00 PM
I consider myself a foodie as well....
Large steak with wild mushroom sauce, with a bowl of basmati rice and a tomato with chopped onion for a side dish. + ny tap water:P

are you left-handed? just curious


...and Fazor....you are funny...cute and edible indeed.

Joe Boy
2009-Jan-07, 08:44 PM
Let me uncomplicate this for all. Now that you have made me hungry and I haven't been able to taste anything for a week or more, this is all you have to know about food: Four lobster tails, shelled with that membrane taken off the back, cooked on a charcoal grill with a large New York cut steak done to medium, one baked potato with a half a stick of butter melted together with sour cream and one small glass of milk for a little wash. After dinner maybe a large glass of Irish Cream with a little milk and sugar mixed in--that's all today and that is all that has to be said about food--next thread please--jb

raffromnewyork
2009-Jan-07, 08:53 PM
are you left-handed? just curious


...and Fazor....you are funny...cute and edible indeed.

No, I am right handed...but I hold my fork in right hand :)

Fazor
2009-Jan-07, 08:54 PM
...and Fazor....you are funny...cute and edible indeed.

For some reason, every time I read the post my eyes skip last set of "..." and I read it as, "Fazor, you are funny, cute and edible."

Please don't eat me! :)

geonuc
2009-Jan-07, 09:05 PM
For some reason, every time I read the post my eyes skip last set of "..." and I read it as, "Fazor, you are funny, cute and edible."

Please don't eat me! :)
Better stay clear of neverfly, then. :)

geonuc
2009-Jan-08, 12:08 AM
I generally season with my own combinations as well, but these rice seasonings have a lot stuff in them I don't have. Plus, I just wanted to buy them. :D
Just to follow up on this, now that I'm home.

The Yasai Fumi Furikake rice seasoning has: sesame seed, carrot, spinach, pumpkin, celery, japanese mustard plant, potato starch, sugar, salt and seaweed.

The Wasabi Fumi Furikake has: sesame seed, horseradish, shaved bonito, japanese mustard plant, sugar, seaweed, soy sauce, salt and rice wine.

The second one sounds most interesting as I love anything that says wasabi (the horseradish in this case).

Fazor
2009-Jan-08, 12:40 AM
Both sound good to me. I'd probably have to marinade some wings in a soy-sauce mix, then season with that and bake for some "Asian Buffalo Wings" or something.

geonuc
2009-Jan-10, 01:45 PM
Mike (http://www.flickr.com/photos/49637895@N00/) is my buddy, and a true foodie. I know this because he gave me a jar of Mickle's Pickles last night. :)

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3525/3184058467_86aa230302.jpg?v=0

Parrothead
2009-Feb-10, 09:58 PM
Currently munching on some fresh baked chocolate chip banana bread. Yum! Daaay-O.

jokergirl
2009-Feb-11, 09:03 AM
Just to follow up on this, now that I'm home.

The Yasai Fumi Furikake rice seasoning has: sesame seed, carrot, spinach, pumpkin, celery, japanese mustard plant, potato starch, sugar, salt and seaweed.

The Wasabi Fumi Furikake has: sesame seed, horseradish, shaved bonito, japanese mustard plant, sugar, seaweed, soy sauce, salt and rice wine.

The second one sounds most interesting as I love anything that says wasabi (the horseradish in this case).

Sounds good. Where do you get them?
I currently have egg furikake (no clue what else is in there, beside sesame seed and nori strips), umeboshi furikake (umeboshi, seaweed, bonito and lots of additives) and salmon (same but with salmon instead of umeboshi).

I made a lovely Japanese Fondue on the weekend... technically I should call it shabu shabu but I used sukiyaki broth because it's a bit more tasty. Using salmon instead of beef, of course.

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/sukiyaki1.jpghttp://joker.mirar.org/bento/sukiyaki2.jpg

;)

geonuc
2009-Feb-11, 09:44 AM
Sounds good. Where do you get them?
I currently have egg furikake (no clue what else is in there, beside sesame seed and nori strips), umeboshi furikake (umeboshi, seaweed, bonito and lots of additives) and salmon (same but with salmon instead of umeboshi).

I made a lovely Japanese Fondue on the weekend... technically I should call it shabu shabu but I used sukiyaki broth because it's a bit more tasty. Using salmon instead of beef, of course.


;)
I get the furikake at the Buford Highway Farmers Market, which is not a true farmers market but rather an asian/hispanic/American mega-grocery store here in the Atlanta area. Probably too far for you to drive, eh?

Nice fondue! :)

jokergirl
2009-Feb-11, 09:46 AM
Kind of :D I was hoping you ordered it somewhere online.

;)

geonuc
2009-Feb-11, 09:53 AM
Kind of :D I was hoping you ordered it somewhere online.

;)
Here's the brand's website (loads a little slowly, I found):

http://www.ajishima.net/en-ajishima/products.html

Of course, you could also ask any friendly BAUTzens you know to send you some. :D

Swift
2009-Feb-11, 04:15 PM
Oh jokergirl, that looks good. And I'm sitting here hungry for lunch. <drool>

jokergirl
2009-Feb-11, 04:25 PM
Here's the brand's website (loads a little slowly, I found):

http://www.ajishima.net/en-ajishima/products.html

Of course, you could also ask any friendly BAUTzens you know to send you some. :D

Ooh, that would be lovely :D But I have no idea what I could send in exchange. Except chili seeds maybe, but you already seem to have some nice ones over there :D Or knäckebröd...

I really didn't like furikake the first time I tried. It must be an acquired taste, like most Japanese food is for me.

;)

geonuc
2009-Feb-11, 05:05 PM
Ooh, that would be lovely :D But I have no idea what I could send in exchange. Except chili seeds maybe, but you already seem to have some nice ones over there :D Or knäckebröd...

I really didn't like furikake the first time I tried. It must be an acquired taste, like most Japanese food is for me.

;)
I'm not sure I like the furikake, although I haven't tried one of the varieties I bought recently.

But if you want some, I'll be happy to send it along. I visit BHFM quite frequently, it isn't expensive at all and sending a bottle or two of seasoning to Sweden can't be much more expensive than shipping rocks to England. :D

PM me if you like. :)

Buttercup
2009-Feb-11, 08:05 PM
I just got an intense craving for beef fried liver 'n onions [like mother used to make] and a baked potato. :D

But we're having lasagne for dinner.

Swift
2009-Feb-11, 09:20 PM
\Homer mode\
Ummmmmm, liver and onions.

NEOWatcher
2009-Feb-11, 09:30 PM
\Homer mode\
Ummmmmm, liver and onions.
and bacon...

Unfortunately; I have to watch my phosphor intake, and liver has about 2 to 3 times as much as a rib-eye steak. Drat.:sad:

Buttercup
2009-Feb-11, 09:35 PM
Broiled bacon-wrapped bits of liver (chicken liver usually) is a favorite appetizer of mine. :) A cinch to make, too.

Sorry about that, NEOWatcher. Too often the foods we love are...somehow to be avoided it seems [I love potatoes and they love to pack on the weight -- so I avoid them].

geonuc
2009-Feb-11, 09:38 PM
Liver. I've tried, I have. But geonuc no like liver. :(

Buttercup
2009-Feb-11, 10:05 PM
I also like chicken livers coated in flour/seasonings and fried in olive oil in a sandwich and I can make a wicked liver pate. :D

PetersCreek
2009-Feb-11, 11:09 PM
I have a pork loin scheduled to come out of the cure and go into the smoker this weekend.

Swift
2009-Feb-11, 11:54 PM
Broiled bacon-wrapped bits of liver (chicken liver usually) is a favorite appetizer of mine. :) A cinch to make, too.

Oh stop..... the drool will short out the keyboard.

@ NEOWatcher - Yeah, though my problem is fat, not phosphorous

@ geonuc - As my dad would have said, that's what makes horse races (see if everyone bet the same, it wouldn't work). Liver is in a group of foods, like anchovies, that you either love or hate, there is no middle ground.

geonuc
2009-Feb-11, 11:57 PM
@ geonuc - As my dad would have said, that's what makes horse races (see if everyone bet the same, it wouldn't work). Liver is in a group of foods, like anchovies, that you either love or hate, there is no middle ground.
Yep. I'm one of the few people I know that will eat anchovies on pizza.

Euniculus
2009-Feb-12, 01:56 AM
Anchovies are yummy. I especially like the marinated ones.

danscope
2009-Feb-12, 03:39 AM
Hi, Anchovies are great on a pizza . Remember: if everyone loved them,.....
they would just be more expensive!
Note: Do not save anchovies. use the whole can... now.
Best regards, Dan

geonuc
2009-Mar-28, 01:38 PM
Food shopping today. Woo-hoo! One of my favorite pastimes. :)

I need to find preserved quail eggs and I know just where to look. A few places actually. And maybe a small free-range chicken to roast. No problem there, either.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-28, 01:42 PM
I also enjoy grocery shopping. :)

Groceries and books...outta my way! ;) The only shopping I like.

geonuc
2009-Mar-28, 04:08 PM
Groceries and books...outta my way! ;)
That about describes me, too. :) I like other kinds of shopping, too.

Well, I'm halfway through my weekend food shopping and I have the fixins for both a pizza and a roast chicken. I bought a small Poulet Rouge Fermier chicken from Whole Paycheck.

http://www.ashleyfarms.com/label-rouge-america.php

So, not sure what's for dinner tonight.

Lurky
2009-Mar-28, 06:38 PM
...outta my way!

Sounds like me when I used to go to an Indian buffet...

I used to consider myself a 'foodie' but now on this stupid gluten free diet I can't eat out anymore... :-(

Buttercup
2009-Mar-28, 06:47 PM
I used to consider myself a 'foodie' but now on this stupid gluten free diet I can't eat out anymore... :-(

Wow, sorry to know that. :(

danscope
2009-Mar-29, 02:07 AM
Hi Buttercup,
I like your line about the hurdy gurdy man. Good times back then. Been playing guitar since the 60's.
**********
Well, about the food. This morning, Celine and I had crepes with srawberries.
Now, special day weekend crepes get filled. In this case, I took about a
3/4 cup of ricotta cheese, a couple TBS of sour cream and a couple tbs of
confctioner's sugar; beat them all together with a fork(whisk will do). This brightens the ricotta and makes it easier to spread as well.
Cut up some strawberries (any berry really) . Put a smile of ricotta onto a hot crepe and add berries. Roll them up and keep warm untill service.
*************
Now, as it would happen, come suppper time, I had some left over mashed potatoes(couple days old), about 2 cups or so. Microwave the mashed potatoes for 2 minutes. It helps. >Into the mixer with an egg and 1/4 cup left over crepe ricotta filler, dash of salt. I sift tsp. of baking powder, 1/2 cup ap flour and some fresh cracked pepper and add this to the bowl, mix well and then loosen it up with some milk ....maybe a half cup or less, depending on
dash of celery salt. Beat well and add a little milk untill you get a medium thick batter (thick but spreadable with a spatula into a 5" pancake.)
In a buttered griddle or a frypan, warm it up on about 7 (7 out of 10) spoon out enough to make a 5" pancake about 1/2 inch thick. Cook till golden and flip, cook and put on a hot dinner plate & into a warm oven while you cook the rest. A larger eletric grill lets you do more....and faster.
These proved to be excellent fare.
Let me know if you like these.
*************************
Cook well and prosper.
Best regards,
Dan

Parrothead
2009-Apr-12, 02:52 AM
Dessert for Easter dinner, just imagine some toasted coconut and whipped cream rosettes hiding the faults. ;) The toppings will be added later tomorrow. Chocolate cream and coconut cream pie. Pie shells and fillings made from scratch.

danscope
2009-Apr-13, 07:46 PM
Sounds good....real good! We had maple frosted napoleons and Key Lime Pie.
And the odd chocolate. Celine likes the dark Lindt truffles..
Good thing lent is over. :)
Dan

danscope
2009-Apr-15, 04:28 PM
Ah.... spring is here! The frogs have announced such.
It brings the promise of fresh, garden...just picked tomatoes and basil.
Does it get much better? :)
Dan

Fazor
2009-Apr-15, 04:49 PM
Ah.... spring is here! The frogs have announced such.
It brings the promise of fresh, garden...just picked tomatoes and basil.
Does it get much better? :)
Dan

We've got a ton of sprouts started inside. They're getting huge already, and it's only been a week. I'm hoping to get my hard tilled in the next few days so it'll be ready to transplant them.

Swift
2009-Apr-15, 05:03 PM
I'm hoping to get my hard tilled in the next few days so it'll be ready to transplant them.
Dr. Freud, your slip is showing. :D

Fazor
2009-Apr-15, 05:07 PM
Who says that's a slip? BAUT could use a little spicing up. That's what Phil and Fraser had in mind when they created this forum, right?

Well, technically my yard was hard, before we got all this rain. Now it's too soggy to do anything with. A day or two of no rain will be perfect though.

danscope
2009-Apr-16, 05:36 AM
Hi, Go for it,Fazor. You shall have your reward in the shape of nice red
fruit that taste good! Store bought tomatoes? We don't nee no steeenkin
store bought tomatoes! :)
Dan

geonuc
2009-Apr-16, 08:35 AM
Last weekend, I planted several tomato plants (so the squirrels will have something to eat this year), okra, basil, arugula and sweet onions. Chile plants haven't arrived yet. :)

jokergirl
2009-Apr-16, 08:50 AM
Nice!

My tomato plants are doing well on my windowsill. as are my chilies.
The lettuces are slow this year. Arugula is tasty but it's not up yet!

But we have sugarpeas. I wonder when they'll start to bloom...

;)

Fazor
2009-Apr-16, 01:58 PM
We've done tomatos before. Those things seem to grow like weeds. This year we also are planting green beans, onions, cucumbers, corn, lettuce, peppers (hot peppers, best kind), and (in window boxes) various herbs. I think I'm leaving out a few veggies, but I'm not sure. Out of all of it, I don't know what'll do well. But it's worth a shot, right?

danscope
2009-Apr-16, 06:27 PM
There is no competition with fresh, homegrown vegetables.
Someone had the idea of using a hay bale, digging a hole in the bale and
inserting a ball of soil to grow tomatoes in. An original raised bed. Insert sticks
to support vines. Simple and cheap. :)
Dan

Parrothead
2009-Apr-19, 09:14 PM
Some fresh baked tea biscuits.

sarongsong
2009-Apr-21, 05:06 AM
...Arugula is tasty...Really? I find it the bitterest of any salad ingredient yet encountered...must be a yin-yang thing... http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

crosscountry
2009-May-01, 01:29 PM
There is no competition with fresh, homegrown vegetables.
Someone had the idea of using a hay bale, digging a hole in the bale and
inserting a ball of soil to grow tomatoes in. An original raised bed. Insert sticks
to support vines. Simple and cheap. :)
Dan

Hay isn't exactly cheap. Does that keep the weeds out?



Our garden we covered with hay for a similar reason. One bale (big round bale) more than covered the garden, so it was cheaper than 1 per plant.

mahesh
2009-May-01, 02:06 PM
I came across this, this morning. So I thought I'd share it with you guys...

quote W C Fields:

Once ... in the wilds of Afghanistan, I lost my corkscrew, and we were forced to live on nothing but food and water for days.

jokergirl
2009-May-01, 03:21 PM
Really? I find it the bitterest of any salad ingredient yet encountered...must be a yin-yang thing... http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

I guess it's an acquired taste. I sure as heck wouldn't try feeding it to kids. (I didn't like it until I got out of teen-age, either. But then, I was a picky kid.)

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/garden090419_2.jpg
http://joker.mirar.org/bento/pea1.jpg
http://joker.mirar.org/bento/sugarpea.jpg

Mmm, sugarpeas. Just like growing candy.

And a chili shot I found pretty:

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/garden090419_5.jpg

;)

geonuc
2009-May-11, 09:43 PM
My photography is not as nice as jokergirl's, but here's a few of my plants (the chiles are just getting started):

Sorrel
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3311/3523634258_000654a28d.jpg

Basil and arugula
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3348/3523634334_2e07eb215c.jpg

Bhut Jolokia chile (very hot)
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3321/3523634574_22079acfbf.jpg

red savina chile (also very hot)
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3339/3523634490_e92445443f.jpg?v=0

danscope
2009-May-11, 09:45 PM
" What is that amazing flavour? !!!! And what gives it that aroma?"
"It's fresh ingredients."

REALLY! :)
Dan

jokergirl
2009-May-30, 07:04 PM
http://joker.mirar.org/bento/tomatoes.jpg

and the final product...

http://joker.mirar.org/bento/caprese.jpg

The Jalapeños were nicely spicy without being overpowering. Yum.

I could use one of those recipes for pickling chiles now...

;)

sarongsong
2009-May-30, 07:20 PM
I think jokergirl must be a staff photographer for Gourmet Magazine---more centerfolds please! :)

geonuc
2009-May-30, 10:35 PM
I think jokergirl must be a staff photographer for Gourmet Magazine---more centerfolds please! :)
I agree. The bento photography on her website also rocks.

PraedSt
2009-May-30, 10:56 PM
How come you foodies get two threads? How about us drinkers?

geonuc
2009-May-30, 11:33 PM
Thread envy. Clearly.

BigDon
2009-Jun-01, 03:38 PM
My friend Ol' Weird Bob has a nice batch of rocoto chilis coming up. Hotter than all seven Hells but with a really nice flavor that actually expresses itself through the flames. Like a bell pepper on steroids. (We called them "Death Peppers".)

At the time we were growing them we didn't know exactly what kind of chili they were and before we could find out a totally alien cold spell killed all the chili plants, which normally live for almost a decade. For two weeks the temps didn't get above 32F, (0 C), with night time temperatures getting downright cold, highly unusual for the San Francisco Bay Area.

Then when Bob was going through his late father's personal effects just this last February he found a container of seeds his father had put up for safe keeping! Stored in a labelled envelope with a dessicant for the last 18 years!

Seven of the 12 planted, germinated and are now growing in half barrels in his back yard. This is so we can put them on rollers and stash them in his garage in case it gets really cold again.

Hmmmm, death peppers....

Fazor
2009-Jun-01, 03:56 PM
My friend Ol' Weird Bob has a nice batch of rocoto chilis coming up. Hotter than all seven Hells but with a really nice flavor that actually expresses itself through the flames. Like a bell pepper on steroids. (We called them "Death Peppers".)

At the time we were growing them we didn't know exactly what kind of chili they were and before we could find out a totally alien cold spell killed all the chili plants, which normally live for almost a decade. For two weeks the temps didn't get above 32F, (0 C), with night time temperatures getting downright cold, highly unusual for the San Francisco Bay Area.

Then when Bob was going through his late father's personal effects just this last February he found a container of seeds his father had put up for safe keeping! Stored in a labelled envelope with a dessicant for the last 18 years!

Seven of the 12 planted, germinated and are now growing in half barrels in his back yard. This is so we can put them on rollers and stash them in his garage in case it gets really cold again.

Hmmmm, death peppers....

My mouth's watering BigDon. I'm planing on making my own 'Tacos al Pastor' recipe here soon, though I'll probably use enough spice to call mine 'Tacos del Diablo'. Haven't decided on just the right pepper to roast, then puree with garlic, roasted tomato, and whatever else I decide on at that particular moment. Then use that to marinate the beef, then cook the lot in a skillet.

I might even try making my own tortilla's. But it'll be a while before I have the time to play pretend chef.

mahesh
2009-Jun-01, 04:09 PM
http://joker.mirar.org/bento/tomatoes.jpg

;)

Is that tomatoes at Sunrise, jokergirl?
Nice pictures, nice dish. You tease.

danscope
2009-Jun-16, 04:44 AM
[QUOTE=jokergirl;1498167]http://joker.mirar.org/bento/tomatoes.jpg
Hi Joker Girl,
Nice tomatoes!! So I picked you for my 2000 th post.
On a side note, I became a Grandfather this week. My Daughter,Adria has born a Daughter, Anya Danielle !!! 7lbs.6 oz. with a nice head of brown hair.
She has my eyes and feet I think. Very good natured. My wife,Celine and I are over the moon. And it only took six years.
I think I'll make a cake. Yellow with mocha frosting and one layer with rasberry preserves. Sounds funny but it is a surprising confection that wins rave awards from our friends. Topped with walnuts, and with a demitasse of esspresso into the rich chocolate frosting, it has become a favorite.
I'll supply the details for next post. It's a 'special occasion' indeed.
Clear skies.
Best regards,
Daniel

Parrothead
2009-Jul-10, 06:44 PM
Was picking red currants today. Will pick white currants tomorrow, pick up some cherries and raspberries, then use the juices heated with a simple syrup to make a currant syrup. Yum!

Tucson_Tim
2009-Jul-10, 06:56 PM
I'm going to fry up a mess of bunker fish tonight but only if I can find a few meadow muffins or road apples to go with it.

jokergirl
2009-Jul-10, 07:49 PM
Was picking red currants today. Will pick white currants tomorrow, pick up some cherries and raspberries, then use the juices heated with a simple syrup to make a currant syrup. Yum!

One of my favourite grandma-desserts ever is a layer of red currants on a sweet chocolate cake, topped with a white egg foam meringue just lightly baked in the oven. The sweet-sour-sweet triple whammy just melts my tastebuds every time. Yum.

;)

Phamph
2009-Jul-11, 02:15 AM
I love to bake bread. I only started doing it about a year ago, and I hate thinking of all the years I wasted with store bought bread. Theres nothing more satisfying (in a kitchen) than seeing the dough you made rising and getting golden brown in the oven. Nothing smells or tastes better either. My wife gave me the title "Master Baker".

megrfl
2009-Jul-23, 08:50 PM
We are trying something new for dinner tonight; Margarita Marinated Chicken breast.

Marinade recipe

3 limes fresh squeezed
1 tsp. lime zest
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. minced garlic
1 tsp. sugar
1/4 cup water

The chicken is currently marinating; we will grill them in about an hour.
I will come back later with the results. :)

geonuc
2009-Jul-23, 09:49 PM
Margarita marinated? Ummm, you forgot something.

megrfl
2009-Jul-24, 12:51 AM
Margarita marinated? Ummm, you forgot something.

Yes! :)

The Margarita(?) chicken was just bad! Too much lime.
Everyone got half a breast down and then we threw the rest out.
There was no salvaging it; not even for chicken salad. :sad:

HenrikOlsen
2009-Jul-24, 09:42 AM
You think it might have worked with less lime?

mahesh
2009-Jul-24, 09:55 AM
So meg, how much was the chicken? Weight-wise, I mean.
Didn't you use any oil in the marinade? was the chicken with or without skin?
Fresh single cream and tomatoes could have rescued it....and some tarragon.

The marinade that you used looks fine, besides the bit about lime juice, as Henrik mentions.

geonuc
2009-Jul-24, 11:26 AM
I think she needed more tequila.

megrfl
2009-Jul-24, 01:58 PM
You think it might have worked with less lime?

Yes, a lot less. On the plus side the chicken acted as a palate cleanser.
We also had sliced tomato and it combined with the residual lime flavor was very refreshing. :)

megrfl
2009-Jul-24, 02:14 PM
So meg, how much was the chicken? Weight-wise, I mean.

2 whole breasts filleted. Weight? I'm not sure.



Didn't you use any oil in the marinade?

No, I thought there should be some olive oil added.


was the chicken with or without skin?

Without skin.


Fresh single cream and tomatoes could have rescued it....and some tarragon.

That sounds yummy. :)


The marinade that you used looks fine, besides the bit about lime juice, as Henrik mentions.

Yes, I would back way off the lime :sick: and use only about 2 tbsps.

megrfl
2009-Jul-24, 02:18 PM
I think she needed more tequila.

I have had my share of margaritas, but I have never tasted tequila by itself (I think it's the worm thing.)
What does it taste like? I have always assumed it's sour.

danscope
2009-Jul-24, 04:51 PM
There are, indeed, many, many tequillas, from cheap to ridiculous $$$$$$.
A few have a slight smoky flavour. For a margherita, don't spend too much.
Sipping is different.
Best regards,
Dan

geonuc
2009-Jul-24, 06:02 PM
I have had my share of margaritas, but I have never tasted tequila by itself (I think it's the worm thing.)
What does it taste like? I have always assumed it's sour.
Well, I don't think there's a worm in tequila. That's in mezcal, I believe. I don't drink the stuff straight anymore, but it can be nice for shooters if you're inclined that way. I disagree about using cheaper stuff in margaritas - if you can afford it, use the best. Your head will thank you in the morning.

Sorry your chicken didn't turn out well. A lot of my 'creations' end up in the garbage can.

Parrothead
2009-Jul-24, 09:58 PM
Did some baking ahead of a pool/bbq party tomorrow (which looks to be rain filled). Here is a sampling, just picture some icing sugar over the bread. There are coconut macaroons too, awaiting a chocolate coating. :D

megrfl
2009-Jul-25, 12:25 AM
Well, I don't think there's a worm in tequila. That's in mezcal, I believe.

That's good to know, I saw a mealworm (?) floating in a bottle of what I thought was tequila and it kinda ruined it for me.


A lot of my 'creations' end up in the garbage can.

Me too. :)

HenrikOlsen
2009-Jul-25, 12:59 AM
It's not really a worm, it's a caterpillar.
And, having eaten one I can state that they have no taste discernible above the mescal and very little texture.

megrfl
2009-Jul-25, 01:59 AM
Caterpillar, that's even better. :)

megrfl
2009-Jul-27, 04:01 PM
I tried some unusual fruit this weekend, Lychee or Litchi.
They taste like uncooked sweet corn.
They were highly recommended.
I found them milky and not very sweet, but peeling away their odd, crackly shell was fun.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lychee

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Litchi_chinensis_Luc_Viatour.jpg

Swift
2009-Jul-27, 04:45 PM
I've had lychees, but only in Chinese restaurants as a dessert - I've also seen them canned in grocery stores. There, they are already peeled and I found them rather sweet, but I suspect they are packed in sugar-water / syrup.

geonuc
2009-Jul-27, 05:19 PM
I've seen them in my fave asian supermarket's grocery section. Never bought one, but I have had them from cans. Kinda looks like a sticky mess.

dwnielsen
2009-Jul-27, 05:25 PM
You can buy lychee juice at, among other places, Indian groceries. It's quite sweet and good - don't know how much sugar is added (if any).

Fazor
2009-Jul-27, 06:01 PM
I like trying exotic fruits when we're at the grocery, but with the way fruit prices have gone way up, it's a habit I've quit. There was one on our last trip that they had sliced and wrapped so you could see what the insides. It looked good, but I couldn't bring myself to pay the $1.49/ea. to try one. Not that in and of itself that's expensive, but it really adds up, particularly when you're and adventurous shopper like myself.

geonuc
2009-Jul-27, 07:24 PM
I bought a dragon fruit (pitaya) a couple of weeks ago. Weird-looking thing, both inside and out, but it wasn't all that tasty. Kinda bland.

megrfl
2009-Jul-27, 11:38 PM
This may sound lame, but the bright pink color of the dragon fruit is pretty.

It looks appealing. Probably nice for a center piece, or fruit basket.

I haven't tasted one though. :)

danscope
2009-Jul-28, 02:55 AM
Ah,........ the cherries are in.... for a few weeks now. Too bad not all year.
Blueberries have come down too.
Just made a mango smoothie.
One mango, one bannana, one cup of peach yogurt, one cup of orange juice. Blend well. Add 4 ice cubes, adjust thickness with a tad more OJ.
If you really need it a tad sweeter, you can add just a small plastic spoonfull of preserves. Just a touch works.
Option 1: One scoop edy's or breyer's vanilla ice cream.

Option 2: A few odd strawberries

Option 3: a ripe peach, pealed sans pit .

These smoothies are not bad at all.

I invite alternative recipies. :)

Best regards,
Dan

jokergirl
2009-Jul-28, 03:35 PM
Lychees are quite common over here in Europe, you can often find them fresh in the supermarkets.
I like them - the crackly peel, the soft squishyness and flavour, and the hard core - but not enough to buy them every time.

Learned to stay away from cactus fruit the hard way, though. :lol:

;)

jokergirl
2009-Sep-13, 10:28 AM
QUESTION to all the chili lovers around here!

I managed to secure some smoked chipotle and dried ancho peppers this Saturday. (Those aren't common in these parts; the supermarket didn't even have a product code for them yet.)
Does anybody have a good recipe for a barbecue sauce or some other nice stuff to do with them?

;)

geonuc
2009-Sep-13, 10:31 AM
QUESTION to all the chili lovers around here!

I managed to secure some smoked chipotle and dried ancho peppers this Saturday. (Those aren't common in these parts; the supermarket didn't even have a product code for them yet.)
Does anybody have a good recipe for a barbecue sauce or some other nice stuff to do with them?

;)
Here's your resource for all things chile:

http://www.fiery-foods.com/

:)

jokergirl
2009-Sep-14, 11:13 AM
Are there any vegetarian recipes on there? All I could find was rubs and more rubs... :(

danscope
2009-Sep-14, 11:13 AM
Thanks, I have been trying to figure out the nature of a recipie called
'Frontier Beans ' from a little south western restaurant called "Lil' Texas "
near by . I think that the chipotle or dried ancho peppers or a combination of both are responsible for the great flavour and subtle but effective heat in this interesting side dish. I couldn't remember the names.
Again, thank You.
Dan

geonuc
2009-Sep-14, 03:40 PM
Are there any vegetarian recipes on there? All I could find was rubs and more rubs... :(
Sure. Don't know if any are good, though. if you click on 'recipes' and then select 'vegetarian' cuisine from the drop-down on the left, maybe there's something that would be suitable.

Or, select 'sauce/marinade' for meal/course and also 'chipotle' for chile. That pulled up a few things.

sarongsong
2009-Oct-05, 07:16 PM
Goodbye Gourmet! :(
October 5, 2009
...The company said it would keep the Gourmet cookbooks and television programming but shut the monthly magazine...
New York Post (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/business/bloodbath_at_conde_nast_mags_axed_0E28iBTko2radgEP VFPUWP)

Swift
2009-Oct-05, 08:13 PM
I just heard. My wife is probably in mourning. She'll have to struggle along with only Bon Apetite, Cooking Light, etc.

Fazor
2009-Oct-05, 08:32 PM
Bah. Reading about cooking is for . . . literates! I prefer to just grab and fry anyway. ;)

I do watch Food Network fairly often though.

mahesh
2009-Oct-05, 08:52 PM
For fun and cooking, one can't beat the late Mr Keith Floyd. IMHO.
Before, everyone became a celebrity chef on television! Bah!
Even when I read any of his quaint books, I can hear him; rasping voiced.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/article6835418.ece


In my yoof, I used to love the Galloping Gourmet, Graham Kerr...so full of humour...delightful chap.

Oh, a quick note for BAUTmods...if my link is considered a commercial push, please delete it.
It's not intended to promote anything.

Just want to share my affinity for Mr Floyd and affection for his style of cooking.

edit:
I'm just changing the link to something more comfortable.

danscope
2009-Oct-06, 07:05 PM
Bah. Reading about cooking is for . . . literates! I prefer to just grab and fry anyway. ;)

I do watch Food Network fairly often though.

I've heard of the house fly, the elephant fly and the horse fly,
but I never seen a 'grab fry ' .:lol:

Dan

danscope
2009-Oct-06, 07:09 PM
Hi, The Galloping Gourmet , aka Graham Kerr is a superb cook with an extraordinary background. Some of my first forays into quality cooking were at his inspiration. First one was ' Mushrooms Alfredo " . I still make this as an appetiser for my friends. It always sits well and has them yearning for more!

Best regards,
Dan

geonuc
2009-Oct-07, 08:38 AM
I, too, mourn the demise of Gourmet. A beautiful magazine.

megrfl
2009-Oct-08, 04:07 PM
Hi, The Galloping Gourmet , aka Graham Kerr is a superb cook with an extraordinary background. Some of my first forays into quality cooking were at his inspiration. First one was ' Mushrooms Alfredo " . I still make this as an appetiser for my friends. It always sits well and has them yearning for more!

Best regards,
Dan

Would you mind posting the recipe? If it's too much of a hassle, don't worry about it. :)

Parrothead
2009-Oct-08, 06:37 PM
LOL! My mom used to love watching the GG on tv.

Am baking a apple, pear and cranberry cobbler as Thanksgiving dessert this weekend.

danscope
2009-Oct-08, 07:04 PM
Hi, I make it from memory. First off, clarify some butter. Start with good, unsalted butter. Yes. Have you a heavy smallish sauce pan or castiron
skillet? Heavy is the word. Place into this one stick (1/4 lb. ) butter and put onto low heat.After ten minutes, you will see a foam on the surface and a sediment has formed cloud-like concentrations under the surface.Take a medium sized spoon and carefully skim off the surface foam, after which you can gently pour off the clarified butter, leaving behind the sediment in the bottom. That sediment and the foam are what burns easilly. The clarified butter will go up to 400 degrees without burning.
Now, take some onions. At least two. They are nice things. Peel and slice
these up aproximately 1/8th inch slices. Set aside. Now, take two pounds of mushrooms! ( OK, if we are poor today, one pound of mushrooms. Halve the recipie...K? :)
Slice up the mushrooms after you have cleaned them up if required. Yes.
We are talking regular white store bought mushrooms. Fresh please.
!/8th inch slices. Set aside. Got some fresh parsley? Good. 1/4 cup chopped of that.
Now, in a nice heavy skillet (why not cast iron) or heavy bottomed nostick,
sautee the onions in half olive oil and half clarified butter. How much?
4 tablespoons ...2 of each will do. Onions, salt and fresh cracked pepper.
After initial stirring, smack (crush) 5 cloves of fresh garlic and poke them into the onions where you can see them. They are crushed with the side of a large knife, but still hold together. We are going to pull them out once they turn brown and we want all of them. A little time passes.Good time to nuke up some chicken stock.... a largish can for 2 lbs of mushrooms. Less for a small batch.
The aroma is extraordinary. I'm french. Ah....
Now..... there's the naughty ones. We pull them, having sweated off the essence. Now they won't stick in some ladie's tooth.
Add onions to the great kettle. Medium heat. Add the Mushrooms !
Take Two tablespoons of tomato paste and add to mushrooms. Stir the whole business. Salt and pepper. Pinch of basil (dried). Cover for two minutes. Stir again. It should look ghastly!!! We are sweating down the mushrooms. Add 1/4 cup of chicken stock and cover. reduce heat to simmer. 5 minutes later,
add the balance of the chicken stock. Simmer for 10 minutes. Not boil...
simmer. Add 1 tbs basil, 1 tsp oregano. Taste. Add parsley. Stir.
Make some croutons. In a cast iron skillet add some bread cubes spray with some olive oil and add some clarified butter....maybe a tbs. medium heat. Toss and keep an eye on them. Season.
In a soup tureen which is pre-warmed with hot water.... dump water and add soup. Beat up a couple of eggs and stir into soup. Serve in small
cups, grate some fresh parmesan and romano and add croutons.
Now, for a nice red wine. Sibulant yet impudent.
For music I suggest Jean Pierre Rampal. Try not to dine alone.
Best regards,
Dan

PS: You never really need that much salt.... but you need some. :)

megrfl
2009-Oct-08, 07:30 PM
Wow, thanks.

Your recipe is not what I expected, there isn't a lick of heavy cream. :)

How do you incorporate the eggs without them cooking upon entry into the soup?

What color is the soup?

Fazor
2009-Oct-08, 07:36 PM
. . . Stir again. It should look ghastly!!! . . .

Ha! I liked that line. It does seem that some of the best dishes I've ever made all share a tendency to look completely horrid halfway through cooking. Often I've been on the brink of dumping the whole mess and calling the local pizza place, but then something hits some magic point, and it all comes together wonderfully (note: I'm not claiming my food always comes out wonderfully, or even edible).

The most striking gross-to-great transformation was the first time I ad-libbed my "Mediterranean" lamb dish. I've never cooked in that style, never been to that area of the world, and never eaten at a Mediterranean restaurant that was any better than a glorified fast-food place. "No worries, I watch Food Network!" I thought.

Halfway through the dish looked awful and almost smelled rancid. As the flavors continued to mingle and the meat began to sear, it all came together. Yum.

danscope
2009-Oct-09, 02:42 AM
Wow, thanks.

Your recipe is not what I expected, there isn't a lick of heavy cream. :)

How do you incorporate the eggs without them cooking upon entry into the soup?

What color is the soup?

Hi, As I recall, Graham just beats the eggs and stirs them into the soup
with the fork. It lends a richness to the dish. Basically, he calls this an appetizer. I am trying to aproximate the amount of seasonings you should want. I taste as I go, and so should you. The idea here is to celebrate the mushrooms. If you are going to serve only some of the whole, divide what you will serve and add the egg to that. Next time, heat the rest and do likewise. I think you will find this dish quite tasty, especially with your own fresh croutons.... 3/4 ' pieces do nicely. A little parmesan regiano finishes this wonderfully. The origin of this dish as I was told by Graham, is a restaurant in Rome named "Alfredo's " . The Galoping Gourmet's cookbook,
"The Graham Kerr Cookbook " did not have this recipie, but he may have
another book of which I do not know. I'm sure there may be a correction of sorts, but this is pretty much the recipe I remember from the TV show in 1965. Do let me know if you liked it. Don't over salt.
The colour is slightly redish.... owing to the tomato paste, with the onions and mushrooms showing along with the tiny bits of stirred egg. The reward is in the tasting. This is the first gourmet recipie I learned from Graham Kerr. If you are using extra large eggs, try just the one. Crack it in a bowl first. Hate to spoil a fine soup with a bad egg!!!!!!! Really.
Best regards,
Dan

danscope
2009-Oct-09, 02:46 AM
Ha! I liked that line. It does seem that some of the best dishes I've ever made all share a tendency to look completely horrid halfway through cooking. Often I've been on the brink of dumping the whole mess and calling the local pizza place, but then something hits some magic point, and it all comes together wonderfully (note: I'm not claiming my food always comes out wonderfully, or even edible).

The most striking gross-to-great transformation was the first time I ad-libbed my "Mediterranean" lamb dish. I've never cooked in that style, never been to that area of the world, and never eaten at a Mediterranean restaurant that was any better than a glorified fast-food place. "No worries, I watch Food Network!" I thought.

Halfway through the dish looked awful and almost smelled rancid. As the flavors continued to mingle and the meat began to sear, it all came together. Yum.

********
Yes, cooking demands patience and courage, and builds character.
Always read the recipe ....twice. Read it slowly and thoroughly. We sometimes miss something IMPORTANT. :)
Always preheat the oven...if required.
Best regards,
Dan

danscope
2009-Oct-09, 02:53 AM
LOL! My mom used to love watching the GG on tv.

Am baking a apple, pear and cranberry cobbler as Thanksgiving dessert this weekend.

**************
He is an extraordinary chef and a great man. He has the enthusiasm to cook and to teach which gives you confidence to try.
I liked watching his show in that he is so thorough in his descriptions and leads you through the complete process. That is the mark of an excellent teacher. Would that we had more of them, and the luxury of time.
Best regards,
Dan

Fazor
2009-Oct-09, 04:05 AM
Always read the recipe ....twice. Read it slowly and thoroughly. We sometimes miss something IMPORTANT. :)
Dan

Heh, that's the exact opposite of my technique. I sometimes skim a recipe for some direction. More fun to just wing it. I'm sure my results are no where near as good, but it's a learning process.

Word for word from a recipe is just reconstruction, not creation! :) (for the record, I don't read instruction manuals that come with that build-it-from-a-box furnature either. Yes, most of the things in my house have a noticable wobble . . . but that's what gives 'em character, right?)

HenrikOlsen
2009-Oct-09, 05:36 AM
I tend to treat recipes as I do any kind of instructions, I try to figure out why they do things the way they do based on different people's ideas of how to do it.
It's been especially interesting with gardening books, since if you read 5 gardening books, you'll know 7 absolutely the only correct ways to do things and at least 6 of them without any explanation why.
At least with cookbooks, the number of one true ways of doing things tend to be no more than the number of books, though the why's are still very far between.

Discovery Channel's series on cooking chemistry, the one with Heston Blumenthal, was really good because they had all their focus on the why, so watching one episode taught more about cooking that a dozen shows showing nothing but recipes.

I remember a really good meal I cooked for my friends from rather mediocre meat after watching the one about the chemistry of beef because I could improvise what it needed to be good based on an understanding of what the processes did to the meat.