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turban
2008-Jul-26, 02:58 AM
I need to find a good college to go to for astronomy. Any suggestions are very appreciated.

FieldTurf
2008-Jul-26, 04:05 AM
Arizona is probably the best in the US

Kaptain K
2008-Jul-26, 06:25 AM
For astronomy, where you do your undergrad studies is not that important. Any school with a decent physics department will do fine. It's when you graduate and start looking for a place to do your Masters and/or Ph.D that which school be comes important!

turban
2008-Jul-26, 06:12 PM
I was thinking of applying to NJIT for undergrad studies buti was asking bout masters or PHD.

Tobin Dax
2008-Jul-27, 09:28 PM
I was thinking of applying to NJIT for undergrad studies buti was asking bout masters or PHD.
What do you want to do? That should influence where you go. You want to go to a university with someone who is doing research on the things you want to.

Kaptain K
2008-Jul-28, 01:42 AM
There are many good schools for astro studies. I'd like to put in a vote for The University of Texas, the best damn school a football team can buy!

danscope
2008-Jul-28, 02:08 AM
I need to find a good college to go to for astronomy. Any suggestions are very appreciated.

Hi, University of Hawaii . Brush up on your math.
Reading list includes: How to win friends and influence people.
Read and heed.
Bring money.

Best regards, Dan

Tobin Dax
2008-Jul-28, 04:32 AM
There are many good schools for astro studies. I'd like to put in a vote for The University of Texas, the best damn school a football team can buy!
Hey, now, I didn't plug UIUC. (That's Eta C's job, anyhow. :D)

Eta C
2008-Jul-28, 06:36 PM
Hail to the Orange,
Hail to the Blue...

Pardon me, did I just feel my ears burning.

Anyway, the area of astronomy you go into will influence the choice of school. As others have noted, you should think about what your research interests are and look for schools that are strong in that area. If you're not sure, choosing a department with a broad base may be a good idea. If your focus is on astrophysics or cosmology, a school that also has a strong physics department with a large particle physics group would also be good.

As Tobin Dax has noted I have a bit of a bias for my alma mater, but you'd be hard pressed to go wrong with any of the major state and private universities. Among the latter Rice is known for a good astro department (Houston and all that).

Now, where was I? Oh yes.

Amid the broad green fields that nourish our land
For honest Labor and for Learning we stand.
And unto thee we pledge our hearts and hands
Dear Alma Mater Illinois!

ngc3314
2008-Jul-28, 07:25 PM
At the risk of offending alumni of somewhere I forget, and keeping to US institutions, the usual top suspects in astronomy and astrophysics include

Caltech
Princeton
Harvard
MIT
University of California (Santa Cruz, Berkeley, UCLA, San Diego, Irvine, Riverside)
Hawaii
Johns Hopkins
Illinois
Texas
Ohio State
Minnesota
Washington
Colorado
Chicago
Maryland

Texas A&M is in the process of growing a program very rapidly, associated with their being a partner in the Giant Magellan Telescope - a few years from now that may allow some interesting opportunities. Florida has built some world-class IR instruments that give them inroads into giant telescopes. Georgia State has concentrated on optical interferometry, running an array in California that can measure the flattened shapes of rapidly rotating stars (among other things).

Aside from these, keep in mind that if you develop a leaning toward cosmology as such, or planetary science, there would be different lists.

trinitree88
2008-Jul-28, 09:36 PM
At the risk of offending alumni of somewhere I forget, and keeping to US institutions, the usual top suspects in astronomy and astrophysics include

Caltech
Princeton
Harvard
MIT
University of California (Santa Cruz, Berkeley, UCLA, San Diego, Irvine, Riverside)
Hawaii
Johns Hopkins
Illinois
Texas
Ohio State
Minnesota
Washington
Colorado
Chicago
Maryland

Texas A&M is in the process of growing a program very rapidly, associated with their being a partner in the Giant Magellan Telescope - a few years from now that may allow some interesting opportunities. Florida has built some world-class IR instruments that give them inroads into giant telescopes. Georgia State has concentrated on optical interferometry, running an array in California that can measure the flattened shapes of rapidly rotating stars (among other things).

Aside from these, keep in mind that if you develop a leaning toward cosmology as such, or planetary science, there would be different lists.


nice list ngc3314, I agree,... as long as you put MIT above Harvard...:lol: pete

Tobin Dax
2008-Jul-29, 03:35 AM
nice list ngc3314, I agree,... as long as you put MIT above Harvard...:lol: pete
I suspect that the list isn't ranked. However, I have a friend who's about to start a postdoc at CfA, so . . . . :)

ngc3314
2008-Jul-29, 01:36 PM
I suspect that the list isn't ranked. However, I have a friend who's about to start a postdoc at CfA, so . . . . :)

I deliberately deranked my mental list (which is why Uncle Charlie's Summer Camp is so far down :) ). I already see that I forgot Arizona (amateur psychologists are free to speculate on whether this might be because, or in spite of, the fact that I worked across the street from there for 3 years). And Michigan. Penn State. Stanford has finally been stepping up to the astronomical plate in a way befitting their overall level. I sure hope none of our prospective grad students are reading this; maybe I should curl the fingers at this point.

By the way, in planning such career training, undergraduates may not know that the great majority of grad students in physics and astronomy in these schools are supported as teaching assistants or research assistants, so it's not as if you have to go deeply into debt to finance this. (Which is a good thing if you look at starting salaries compared to some other career preparations which take comparably long).

turban
2008-Jul-31, 06:49 PM
Thank you all for the suggestions. I will start to think about the specific field i will want to go into but the suggestions are very appreciated.

turban
2008-Aug-12, 10:29 PM
Now here was question asked by my cousin who really wants to be an aerospace engineer. What are good places to study for aerospace engineering. I told him the only thing i knew about it was not all schools that say "aerospace" is just the same as aeronautical engineering. Does anyone know good schools or any good suggestion on how to look for good schools?

matthewota
2008-Aug-13, 03:41 AM
You left out Cornell, which has an excellent planetary astronomy department, thanks to Gerard Kupier, Carl Sagan et al.

markseibold
2008-Aug-15, 06:32 AM
Dear Turban

I might suggest the one that is (was) 3 minutes from my home for over 25 years until I just lost my home that I designed and built 20 years ago, in foreclosure.

Mount Hood Community College is about 17 miles east of Portland Oregon in Gresham Oregon where all the world seems to be moving now. MHCC has a very old fashioned and intimate planetarium with a great teacher - lecturer. I have been a guest lecturer there many times. Never mind that those who say it rains
here too much, would not know it, but Portland has some of the clearest cleanest and a half hour drive out of town, the darkest skis in the nation.

Not to mention that Portland is now voted nationwide as the most European-like city in the nation.

For an idea of where I conducted astronomy for all for the past 10 years, for thousands of miles (10,000 miles on a one month solo road trip across the US ~ Canadian continent) including doing it with John Dobson here for many hours on the sidewalks and for schools students; see this for my award winning astronomy art and photography- I have spoke on NPR about this many times (Linked archives of discussions - My astronomy pastel sketches have appeared many times in Spaceweather.com and once in Astronomy Picture of the Day Nov 17th 2006
) >

www.myspace.com/marksolarprophet

Mark Seibold
Artist - Astronomer

Tobin Dax
2008-Aug-16, 03:29 AM
Mark,

You do bring up a good point by mentioning community colleges. They are a good way to start a college career if you don't want to start at a four-year university for whatever reason. However, moving to a different state to attend a community college is not something that I would recommend. That would end up being more cost-prohibitive than such a venture should be.

I'm not slighting MHCC. I'm sure it's a good school, but there's only a slim chance that MHCC itself is the right 2-year college for the OP, if he wants to go that route.

I do have to thank you for posting this on a Friday, Mark. I need to go try to stream MHCC's jazz night radio broadcast.