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View Full Version : BBQ in space is tastier.



goatboy
2008-Aug-15, 05:43 AM
Why BBQ your ribs in space? I've got 3 reasons why this technique guarantees your zero G ribs will be more delicious than any cooked on earth.

1) With conventional gravity bound barbeque, the meat sits on a grill with flames and heat ascending to roast the meat. Gravity causes the juices and rub (wet or dry) to drip off the meat requiring one to replenish with basting. In space the ribs will retain more moisture as evaporation, not gravity is the only thing drying them out.

2) Ribs in zero G could be coated with much more sauce or rub, and more evenly on both sides requiring less basting and opening of the lid. There's no way you could apply such a thick coating of rub to ribs on earth. Thus, zero G ribs would be both juicier, and more flavorful.

3) In zero G, a denser concentration of smoke comes in contact with the meat once you drop the grill lid since the smoke (and heat) will tend to remain under the hood and not "leak up" -- The more smoke, the tastier the BBQ. I admit the meat juices and rub needs to drip off onto the heating element to create smoke, but this can be done by simulating gravity by rotating the ribs -- like in a rotisserie, but better. This is far more controllable than simply letting gravity dictate.

In summary: The combination of these 3 zero G grill attributes makes for a gastronomic orgasm of BBQ delight. What are your thoughts?

Neverfly
2008-Aug-15, 05:54 AM
The meat might retain too much juiciness and end up having the consistency of cantaloupe.

goatboy
2008-Aug-15, 06:08 AM
With tough meats (like ribs), juicier is ALWAYS better. Besides, rotisseries on earth tend to mitigate the effect of gravity and the meat is delicious. Anyway, tough meats are often cooked in some liquid, that's what braising is.

Now a filet mignon would have the consistency of cantaloupe if cooked in liquid, but not tough meats.

X-COM
2008-Aug-15, 11:57 AM
This just what they need on the ISS, a barbecue! :P

Swift
2008-Aug-15, 02:39 PM
I'm glad we finally found a viable commercial application that will make NEO operations a financial success.

cjl
2008-Aug-16, 02:19 AM
The world's juiciest bbq? I'd enjoy it :D

ABR.
2008-Aug-16, 02:26 AM
This just what they need on the ISS, a barbecue! :P

When exactly is the back porch module being sent up to the station, anyway?

Warren Platts
2008-Aug-16, 03:12 AM
No way BBQ in space is tastier. The reports from the ISS are uniformly that food tastes blander in space than on Earth. Hence the jealous regard they have for their personal stashes of hot sauce.

goatboy
2008-Aug-16, 11:50 PM
Zero G cuisine will take off someday. Suddenly the cooking of food will take into account different "processes" -- the physics will be different. Imagine how light and fluffy bread and muffins will be if allowed to expand in zero G.

Bearded One
2008-Aug-17, 09:59 PM
No way BBQ in space is tastier. The reports from the ISS are uniformly that food tastes blander in space than on Earth. Hence the jealous regard they have for their personal stashes of hot sauce.You just place the delivery joint in space and drop the orders directly into the customer's back yard :lol:

goatboy
2008-Aug-18, 02:34 AM
You just place the delivery joint in space and drop the orders directly into the customer's back yard :lol:

Absolutely. Plus you'd keep the ribs piping hot till they landed using nothing but re-entry friction heat.

Warren Platts
2008-Aug-18, 03:04 AM
Are goat ribs on the menu? :razz:

goatboy
2008-Aug-18, 03:07 AM
Are goat ribs on the menu? :razz:

Take a bite, it's awfully spicy though so watch out!
SssSsssSssss

goatboy
2008-Sep-06, 08:05 PM
They don't send pigs to the ISS for experimentation purposes because they're too big and heavy -- smaller animals will suffice for testing. I disagree with this logic. Why not take full advantage of the pig(s)? After testing is completed, why not carve out some dinner?

I bet a small pig could provide the residents of the ISS with several delicious meals of pork chops, ribs and ham steaks -- not to mention sausage and bacon. They could make pig stock for soup using the pig bones. Little of the pig would be wasted.

Nicolas
2008-Sep-07, 10:01 AM
Plus investigation of pig tail curliness in zero gravity would be of paramount importance for our civilisation as a whole.

djellison
2008-Sep-07, 03:51 PM
Convection doesn't work in space, so BBQ'ing is out.

Bearded One
2008-Sep-07, 04:00 PM
Convection doesn't work in space, so BBQ'ing is out.Just use some forced circulation. If there's a will ...

Nicolas
2008-Sep-07, 09:19 PM
Convection doesn't work in space, so BBQ'ing is out.

RDQ: Radi-que. Radiation based BBQ.

goatboy
2008-Sep-08, 07:48 AM
Convection doesn't work in space, so BBQ'ing is out.


Nothing wrong with an ultra light, black, heat resistant plastic bubble filled with air and a marinated pig soaking up the sun's hot rays while attached outside the ship. Stick a solar powered fan inside the floating oven for convection and you've got a juicy delicious surprise in ... say 6 hours guaranteed.

But to keep it simple, just roast it on board, a light collapsible oven large enough to accommodate a small pig could easily be sent up, or just roast the pig in separate pieces, no prob. High efficiency (pig does some experiments, then is eaten), most of the pig will be used, a great morale booster, significant media exposure, some delicious ribs, pork chops and bacon for breakfast -- seriously, why not?

djellison
2008-Sep-08, 08:41 AM
seriously, why not?

Ever tried to train a pig to a) live on zero g. b) use a zero g toilet

Pig poo floating thru the ISS probably isn't a good moral booster.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-08, 12:37 PM
Ever tried to train a pig to a) live on zero g. b) use a zero g toilet

Pig poo floating thru the ISS probably isn't a good moral booster.

Pigs are actually quite intelligent...;)

goatboy
2008-Sep-08, 11:49 PM
Ever tried to train a pig to a) live on zero g. b) use a zero g toilet

Pig poo floating thru the ISS probably isn't a good moral booster.

Rabbit and monkey poo wasn't a big morale booster either, but they still sent those animals to space.

Bearded One
2008-Sep-09, 12:21 AM
Ever tried to train a pig to a) live on zero g. b) use a zero g toiletIn semi-seriousness, these might be the most important questions that need to be answered if humans are to migrate into space. ;)

djellison
2008-Sep-09, 07:24 AM
Rabbit and monkey poo wasn't a big morale booster either, but they still sent those animals to space.

But did the Humans share the ride?

goatboy
2008-Sep-09, 08:46 AM
Keep the pig in a cage for a few days after it's transported to the ISS. Maybe a little vivisection testing, or whatever the heck astronauts do when they test small mammals. Then it's BBQ time, and not just any BBQ, the juiciest and most delicious BBQ possible (for reasons I've stated above).

Nicolas
2008-Sep-09, 12:45 PM
If a pig is a small animal, what do you propose as far as sending large animals into space goes? A blue whale? ;)

goatboy
2008-Sep-09, 06:49 PM
If a pig is a small animal, what do you propose as far as sending large animals into space goes? A blue whale? ;)

Whales can't fit on the ISS, a pig certainly could. Like dogs, pigs come in all shapes and sizes :)

John Jones
2008-Sep-09, 07:48 PM
It sounds like a good idea, but you gotta do it with a lot of hickory wood.

I like my ribs dry-rub style.

And you gotta deliver. Take-out from LEO doesn't fit my budget.

John Jones
2008-Sep-09, 07:49 PM
Sorry for the double post. BAUT is suddenly running very slow.

mugaliens
2008-Sep-15, 12:40 AM
And you gotta deliver. Take-out from LEO doesn't fit my budget.

Low-cost, zero-G ribs are available via the Vomit Comet, but "Vomit Ribs" didn't do well during the early marketing tests...

Drunk Vegan
2008-Sep-15, 01:25 AM
Would it really be possible to have open flames on a spaceship?

You know, the whole, high-oxygen environment tends to be a little finicky when it comes to a gigantic * fire * burning up the air.

Seems like the risk of explosion and the consumption of breathable air precludes BBQ as a viable LEO cooking technique.

goatboy
2008-Sep-15, 05:34 AM
Would it really be possible to have open flames on a spaceship?

You know, the whole, high-oxygen environment tends to be a little finicky when it comes to a gigantic * fire * burning up the air.

Seems like the risk of explosion and the consumption of breathable air precludes BBQ as a viable LEO cooking technique.


Tough meat BBQ isn't with open flames, as in "flames licking the ribs" -- it's all about low and slow cooking, several hours of roast, 250 Fahrenheit max for a side of ribs. Flames licking the ribs would char the hell out of em in 20 min. I'm talking a low power heating element.

An efficient, pressure sealed (if necessary) oven on LOW power could be utilized safely and efficiently. Each pig could provide a week's worth of sausage, bacon, ribs and and pork roasts, in addition to advancing the cause of science.

djellison
2008-Sep-15, 04:05 PM
Would it really be possible to have open flames on a spaceship?

Actually - it's not the Oxygen that's the problem ( the atmosphere on the ISS is roughly the same as sea level on earth in terms of pressure, and N2 / O2 ratios )

The problem is that the flames don't go 'up' - because it's convection that makes them go up on Earth - and convection relies on gravity. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZTl7oi05dQ&feature=related


Doug