PDA

View Full Version : General cliches that get on your nerves.



Pages : [1] 2

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-18, 08:03 PM
Inspired by Michael Phelps and the movie cliche's thread.

"You can do anything you want as long as you put your mind to it."

Often said after some amazing accomplishment that it would seem only one person on the planet has ever put their mind to. I believe the 41 year old swimmer said something similar. Must be nobody else has the mind power of these two individuals.

mike alexander
2008-Aug-18, 08:19 PM
"Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger."

And often causes masssive internal injuries.

redshifter
2008-Aug-18, 08:23 PM
'Let's think outside the box'

geonuc
2008-Aug-18, 08:33 PM
"There's no such thing as a stupid question."

Just stupid people asking them.

jj_0001
2008-Aug-18, 08:39 PM
Well, down the line:

General Cliche'
Colonel O. F. Tematter
Major Mistake
Captain Obvious
Lt. ???

Seriously, there are so many I've heard, but the religious ones come to mind, so I'll stop now.

tdvance
2008-Aug-19, 01:46 AM
The only stupid question is the one not asked

(which is far from true)

The best things in life are free

(they might not be purchasable with paper money, but that doesn't make them free!)

billslugg
2008-Aug-19, 04:59 AM
"Money can't buy happiness."

They just don't know where to shop.

Van Rijn
2008-Aug-19, 05:16 AM
"Violence never solved anything."

Sure, it is important to avoid unnecessary violence, but sometimes there is no choice, and it certainly can solve things.

pzkpfw
2008-Aug-19, 05:36 AM
"Beauty is only skin deep".

(Plenty of good looking people are nice people too, and some not so good looking people are ugly inside too.)

nauthiz
2008-Aug-19, 05:50 AM
That one about the Inuit having 5.28E34 words for snow.

It's never quite as exciting anymore after you look in a thesaurus and realize that English has 8.32E37 words for snow.

sarongsong
2008-Aug-19, 06:40 AM
"a self-made man" :lol:

Tog
2008-Aug-19, 07:35 AM
"Men want to be him, women want to be with him."

One I noticed in TV shows in the mid-80s. This was in every detective/action show I can think of, and it bugged me when I was 14. There will be the episode where:
The gruff hero falls for the woman who is either blind or deaf.
The person that is afraid for their life is really a split personality and is also the "badguy".
A secondary character finds love. By the end of the episode, the newfound love is revealed as a "badguy" that was just using the person.
Any new character that is likable to anyone but one of the main characters will have a breakthrough with that main character just in time to be killed, usually in the arms of the main character, in a long drawn out death scene.
Fleeing suspects will always run up to the roof of a building.
Any moderately well known actor that gets a guest spot on a show will be the badguy.
The judge will "allow it, but it better show some relevance".
Any scene of something very common and ordinary that goes on just a bit too long will end in a shock, such as the death of a major character, or a big reveal on some secret association.

mfumbesi
2008-Aug-19, 07:37 AM
"It takes two to tango.."

I don't know about you, but I am not big on dancing.

mfumbesi
2008-Aug-19, 07:39 AM
"Rome wasn't build in a single day"

I suppose London or New York were just banged together in one afternoon.

geonuc
2008-Aug-19, 07:39 AM
"Money can't buy happiness."

They just don't know where to shop.
Or rephrased:

"Money isn't everything."

But it's way ahead of whatever's in second place.

slang
2008-Aug-19, 08:05 AM
There are two sides to it, and the truth is probably somewhere in the middle.

But not when there's a correct and a wrong side.

jokergirl
2008-Aug-19, 09:00 AM
Godwin's Law, also known as the reductio ad Hitlerum:

"You know who else liked Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs? HITLER DID!"

;)

jokergirl
2008-Aug-19, 09:03 AM
Oh, and:

"Girls always go for the jerk, not for the nice guy."
(usually to be read as that the whiny jerk speaking thinks of himself as the nice guy)

;)

Neverfly
2008-Aug-19, 09:11 AM
Godwin's Law, also known as the reductio ad Hitlerum:

"You know who else liked Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs? HITLER DID!"

;)

Dwarves gotta stick together.

AndreasJ
2008-Aug-19, 10:30 AM
"Beauty is only skin deep".

(Plenty of good looking people are nice people too, and some not so good looking people are ugly inside too.)

“I'm tired of all this nonsense about beauty being only skin-deep. That's deep enough. What do you want, an adorable pancreas?”
-- Jean Kerr

Lianachan
2008-Aug-19, 11:53 AM
Racial stereotyping.

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-19, 01:23 PM
"Money can't buy happiness."

They just don't know where to shop.

It may not buy happiness, but it can sure make misery a lot more fun.

Good stuff so far.

SeanF
2008-Aug-19, 02:16 PM
"Money can't buy happiness."

They just don't know where to shop.
"You're dead for a real long time.
You just can't prevent it.
So if money can't buy happiness.
I guess I'll have to rent it."
--"Weird Al" Yankovic

:)

Moose
2008-Aug-19, 02:17 PM
"Girls always go for the jerk, not for the nice guy."
(usually to be read as that the whiny jerk speaking thinks of himself as the nice guy)

Glenn "That Canadian Guy" Foster had a routine where he'd point out the obverse cliché of women claiming to want "nice guys" but can never find them.

"There are lots of nice guys out there. They're easy to recognize. They're the ones you [gripe] to about the jerks you're sleeping with."


----

"Money can't buy happiness. But it can rent it."

[edit: Ha. You beat me to it, Sean.]

Moose
2008-Aug-19, 02:18 PM
"If money is the root of all evil, I'd like to be a bad, bad man." - Huey Lewis.

jfribrg
2008-Aug-19, 02:33 PM
Inspired by Michael Phelps and the movie cliche's thread.

"You can do anything you want as long as you put your mind to it."

Often said after some amazing accomplishment that it would seem only one person on the planet has ever put their mind to. I believe the 41 year old swimmer said something similar. Must be nobody else has the mind power of these two individuals.


I heard the same thing and had the same reaction. Without a doubt, Phelps deserves his accomplishment, but he should at least acknowledge that he chose his parents well. To do what he did requires an enormous commitment, but all that training would have meant nothing if he didn't inherit a body that was perfectly suited for swimming. The right type of muscles, perhaps a larger than normal heart, relatively short legs, very long torso and arms, etc. Without those, he would not have been so dominant.

Matherly
2008-Aug-19, 02:34 PM
"It was a Perfect Storm of (pick one: Economic factors, political motivations, rabbit infestations, etc.)."

It has gotten to the point where anyone who uses the "Perfect Storm" cliche immediatly loses any credibility.

Delvo
2008-Aug-19, 04:01 PM
"Beauty is only skin deep".

(Plenty of good looking people are nice people too, and some not so good looking people are ugly inside too.)This is an especially odd category of cliché: the kind that not even the speaker really believes is true, and would, even if true, be irrelevant to the subject that it's usually brought up to address. (They talk about whether they'd choose looks or personality to imply that they don't want both, but of course everybody does want both, which wouldn't change even if the combination were impossible as they're claiming it is.)

However, in this thread, using things that women say about men and relationships and what they supposedly want from either of the above is a kind of cheating, too easy: practically everything women say on that subject is a cliché, and usually even this particular type (not just worn out but also dishonest and irrelevant to the context in which it's usually raised). It's like going into a thread about bad science in science fiction and using examples from SPOOFS of science fiction, or copying & pasting from the Ikea website in a thread about cheap furniture.

Gillianren
2008-Aug-19, 04:08 PM
. . . practically everything women say on that subject is a cliché . . . .

But not men?

SeanF
2008-Aug-19, 04:16 PM
This is an especially odd category of cliché: the kind that not even the speaker really believes is true, and would, even if tree, be irrelevant to the subject that it's usually brought up to address. (They talk about whether they'd choose looks or personality to imply that they don't want both, but of course everybody does want both, which wouldn't change even if the combination were impossible as they're claiming it is.)
"Beauty is only skin deep" does not claim the combination is impossible. It's no different than "You can't judge a book by its cover." While it is sometimes true that the "outside" and the "inside" match, it is also sometimes true that they don't. That's why using the outside to make assumptions about the inside is a judgmental error.

tofu
2008-Aug-19, 04:51 PM
I'm tired of the "men are stupid" cliche. I notice it most often in commercials. The male does something stupid and the woman just roles her eyes, or easily fixes the problem with her god-like intellect, or is condescending and paternal - treats him like a child.

example 1 (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpgeACOMS9o)
example 2 (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=M1-a1Pe8gyY)
example 3 (http://www.throwbot.com/sp.cfm?pageid=127)
example 4 (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=aa1tBoSWXoI)
example 5 (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=qalOYQrgxqQ)

Also, I couldn't find a link but I saw a commercial this morning for (I think) Pepto Bismol where the wife is on the phone describing how her husband is sick because he "got into everything" and even ate dog food.

There's also one where a male is supposed to paint a room in a house, and he does it with a paintball gun because he lazy and stupid (like all males).

jokergirl
2008-Aug-19, 05:57 PM
Yeah, but if the roles were reversed everybody would be yelling sexism.
Apparently it's not sexism if it's not against women. (yeah right!) :P

;)

Moose
2008-Aug-19, 06:12 PM
Cynical Marketing 101: Make your target demographic feel superior to someone. Anyone, really. Then tie your crappy product to that temporary feeling of euphoria to encourage a Pavlovian response.

Since our crap is marketed to women, commercials should be geared to make women feel superior to and oppressed by men. From then on, your husband does something stereotypically manly, *ding* we need more X-Brand floor cleaning crap with "All Natural[tm]*" lemon scent

*(All Natural being the company name of our chief supplier of Lyman #82[tm] for 62 cents a gallon, made mostly of extract of ground uranium and puppies, but we won't tell you that, being a trade secret.)

tdvance
2008-Aug-19, 06:23 PM
The latest marketing pattern--it used to be "are you losing your hair?" but now they say, "you're losing your hair and just want to look younger."

I get annoyed with a commercial telling me what I'm supposedly thinking, but I guess only ones who don't agree with the commercial think that and wouldn't be customers anyway.

tdvance
2008-Aug-19, 06:25 PM
Or, as alluded to--essentially meaningless words in advertisement (saves from a false-advertising claim): all natural, homeopathic, fabulous, reduced fat, new larger size (that is the size it was a year ago, but they made them smaller for a while because of inflation), etc.

Trebuchet
2008-Aug-19, 06:52 PM
As mentioned in Sticks "Contagious Woo-Woo" thread:

"X-million people can't be wrong."

Yes, they can. And often are.

slang
2008-Aug-19, 07:14 PM
"I know it's a cliche, but..."

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-19, 07:38 PM
"I know it's a cliche, but..."

Beautiful.

samkent
2008-Aug-19, 07:49 PM
"Politically correct "
"Racial equality"

and the one I still use

"I feel more like I do now than I did before."

tdvance
2008-Aug-19, 07:52 PM
well, more funny than annoying, but: "I'm not myself lately". Ok, exactly who are you then?

(ok, it WAS funny in The Sixth Day).

Tog
2008-Aug-19, 08:05 PM
... made mostly of extract of ground uranium and puppies, but we won't tell you that, being a trade secret.)

A little Sunkist soda came out of my nose because of this. Do you have any idea how bad that burns?

pzkpfw
2008-Aug-19, 09:03 PM
...using things that women say about men and relationships...

That's an oddly specific instance of the use of that cliche.



"It was a Perfect Storm of (pick one: Economic factors, political motivations, rabbit infestations, etc.)."

It has gotten to the point where anyone who uses the "Perfect Storm" cliche immediatly loses any credibility.

In that case - I add adding "gate" (from "Watergate") as a suffix to anything conspiracy or scandal related. And that happens here in New Zealand.

A recent example is the fuss over some genetically modified corn - it was called "corngate".

Enough already.

Matherly
2008-Aug-19, 09:15 PM
In that case - I add adding "gate" (from "Watergate") as a suffix to anything conspiracy or scandal related. And that happens here in New Zealand.

Amen! Testify!



A recent example is the fuss over some genetically modified corn - it was called "corngate".

(Matherly falls out of his chair laughing)

Larry Jacks
2008-Aug-19, 09:43 PM
"X-million people can't be wrong."

Yes, they can. And often are.

"If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish thing."
-- Anatole France

slang
2008-Aug-19, 09:48 PM
I know what I saw!

(Then why are you posting about it, asking or speculating what it was?)

Delvo
2008-Aug-19, 11:27 PM
"X-million people can't be wrong."

Yes, they can. And often are.That's a very confuzzling one for me, because surely everybody is aware of some cases in which millions of people disagree with other millions of people about something and both sides can't possibly be right in the same world, which makes it obvious that in those cases millions on one side or the other MUST be wrong...

Delvo
2008-Aug-19, 11:30 PM
(Matherly falls out of his chair laughing)There's one! People describing their own actions in third person form (and present tense)... especially when the actions are wildly exaggerated things that didn't actually happen!

...which reminds me of another internet classic: claiming to have just ruined a keyboard or monitor by spitting a beverage on it!

Whirlpool
2008-Aug-19, 11:41 PM
"It's not you , it's me, I'm sorry. "

Boy/Girl common cliche' when breaking up with their partner.

turbo-1
2008-Aug-19, 11:48 PM
I am sick to death of "if it saves just one life" in reference to peoples' wanting to lower speed limits, legislate helmet-use by bikers, make seat-belt use mandatory, or banning smoking in bars (I am not a smoker BTW, and I played guitar and sang in bars for a lot of years, and hated the smoke). Do-gooders often use this phrase to justify the "need" to exert control over people who do things that they don't.

pzkpfw
2008-Aug-20, 05:49 AM
Here's (a BAUT) one:

"Toseeked by..." (generally posted by someone who isn't toseek.)

(Sometimes there's a reason why a post might be made in a given thread. Just because it contains a link that has (exactly or essentially) already been posted in another thread does not mean it needs a "toseeked" reply. It seems to become more about a game of who can spot the similarity, and less about removing duplication.)

Tog
2008-Aug-20, 05:57 AM
"... for the children"

This was actually used in the debate as to whether or not to get rid of daylight savings time in Utah. The main argument to keep it was that the kids would have to wait for the school bus in the dark.

You know, like they do all winter.

Van Rijn
2008-Aug-20, 08:07 AM
Here's (a BAUT) one:

"Toseeked by..." (generally posted by someone who isn't toseek.)

(Sometimes there's a reason why a post might be made in a given thread. Just because it contains a link that has (exactly or essentially) already been posted in another thread does not mean it needs a "toseeked" reply. It seems to become more about a game of who can spot the similarity, and less about removing duplication.)

"ToSeeked" goes back to BABB (not BAUT) before I started. It came about because ToSeek has a habit of being the first person linking to interesting articles, but it came to refer to anyone who has done so, and you don't have to be that person to point out the "ToSeek."

Sure, sometimes people get it wrong, but there are a lot of cases where the same subject or the same articles have come up before, often with significant discussion. There have been cases of subjects brought up that have been ToSeeked half a dozen times. I think it's important, giving people links to where a subject has been covered before. It does reduce redundancy - at least when folks pay attention.

pzkpfw
2008-Aug-20, 08:25 AM
...see above...

Yep, I understand the history, and the utility. (...and I like that BAUT has its' own culture).

I'm just whining about its' sometimes overzealous use or simple mis-use.

(Though it's my subjective opinion that this occurs. My post above came about from being given a "toseeked" for posting a New Zealand link about the Bigfoot hoax in the thread started by Paul Leeks, in which the last post was today, and being told it wasn't the "current Bigfoot thread" [and having bowed out of that other thread when it devolved into simple humour {which I participated in}]).

I'm not at all saying "toseeked" should be banished as a verb or adjective - just as a cliche.

SkepticJ
2008-Aug-20, 08:33 AM
"It's not you , it's me, I'm sorry. "

Boy/Girl common cliche' when breaking up with their partner.

"Of course it's you, 'cause I'm perfect, baby."

AndreasJ
2008-Aug-20, 10:15 AM
But not men?

Men aren't articulate enough to formulate clichés.

Neverfly
2008-Aug-20, 10:20 AM
Men aren't articulare enough to formulate clichés.

Check in with this post here (http://www.bautforum.com/1305218-post31.html).

AndreasJ
2008-Aug-20, 10:26 AM
I read it. I don't think it makes quite the same point as mine (inarticulateness and stupidy are frequent bedfellows, but you can have either without the other), and it's not half as funny.

Neverfly
2008-Aug-20, 10:28 AM
I read it. I don't think it makes quite the same point as mine (inarticulateness and stupidy are frequent bedfellows, but you can have either without the other), and it's not half as funny.
You walked into it and set yourself up for that one.

It's a stereotype that men are inarticulate.

jokergirl
2008-Aug-20, 10:59 AM
Ohh.

Something is better because it's "natural".

Even if it's the same bloody chemical, pure, no additives.

;)

Lianachan
2008-Aug-20, 10:59 AM
I'm not at all saying "toseeked" should be banished as a verb or adjective - just as a cliche.
I'm pretty sure I can remember the term having a wikipedia article, which amused me greatly given that it's only something in use on these boards and only by a subset of members, at that. I don't know, maybe those members have taken it elsewhere with them... but widespread enough to have a wikipedia article? That's just hilarious.

AndreasJ
2008-Aug-20, 11:47 AM
It's a stereotype that men are inarticulate.
Well, duh. Why else would I have brought it up and lampooned it?

Moose
2008-Aug-20, 12:33 PM
Even if it's the same bloody chemical, pure, no additives.

Yup, while the "natural" one bypasses the refining and control processes, and most of the safety ones as well.

Steve Novella of SGU pointed out a while back that the dosage in herbals could vary by as much as 17x. He's called them "dirty drugs" many times.

Moose
2008-Aug-20, 12:34 PM
I'm pretty sure I can remember the term having a wikipedia article, which amused me greatly given that it's only something in use on these boards and only by a subset of members, at that. I don't know, maybe those members have taken it elsewhere with them... but widespread enough to have a wikipedia article? That's just hilarious.

Pretty much what wikipedia said when they removed it, I'm told.

SeanF
2008-Aug-20, 01:27 PM
"... for the children"

This was actually used in the debate as to whether or not to get rid of daylight savings time in Utah. The main argument to keep it was that the kids would have to wait for the school bus in the dark.

You know, like they do all winter.
That's not just a cliche, it's bad logic. Why would you want kids to wait in the dark?

Just kidding - I know you meant "...would not have to wait..." But it's still bad logic, because DST makes it darker in the morning, not lighter. Keeping the schoolkids from waiting in the dark is why we don't do DST in the winter.

How about "giving 110%"? That one really bugged my father.

And, somewhat related, before our final softball game of the season last night, one of the players said that this season was a "360-degree turnaround from last year." :doh:

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-20, 01:38 PM
And, somewhat related, before our final softball game of the season last night, one of the players said that this season was a "360-degree turnaround from last year." :doh:

I don't think a 360-degree trunaround is a cliche. I think it's just a mistaken attempt at saying it's a 180-degree turn. Kind of like Yogi Berra's, "Baseball is 90% mental, the other half is physical."

SeanF
2008-Aug-20, 02:34 PM
I don't think a 360-degree trunaround is a cliche. I think it's just a mistaken attempt at saying it's a 180-degree turn. Kind of like Yogi Berra's, "Baseball is 90% mental, the other half is physical."
I did say it was somewhat related. :)

And it probably happens almost often enough to be a cliche, anyway. :)

Moose
2008-Aug-20, 03:00 PM
Royal Canadian Air Farce used to get their giggles pointing out how often politicians use the "turned the corner on" cliché by having their caricatures "turn the corner" four times.

Matherly
2008-Aug-20, 03:29 PM
There's one! People describing their own actions in third person form (and present tense)... especially when the actions are wildly exaggerated things that didn't actually happen!

(Matherly sticks his tounge out at Delvo)

( ;) )

Gillianren
2008-Aug-20, 03:55 PM
How about the one that all women are obsessed with shopping, particularly for shoes?

Donnie B.
2008-Aug-20, 03:56 PM
How about "giving 110%"? That one really bugged my father.
While I agree that it's a badly overused cliche, it's not entirely illogical. You can make the argument that "giving 100%" refers to a normal full-out effort, but not really the very most that one could do.

Consider the fact that special circumstances (such as a burst of adrenaline) can alter our physical capabilities. I might "give 100%" and not be able to lift a car off the ground, but when it's on fire and my loved one is trapped under it I might be able to "give 110%" and do so.

So the phrase might bother me due to its overuse, but not so much because it's illogical -- in the above sense, it really is possible to give more than the most you can give.

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-20, 05:31 PM
Neverfly brought it up in another thread:

Open / Closed minded

Not sure if they qualify as cliche's, perhaps in some context - but they certainly are over-used.

Matherly
2008-Aug-20, 05:52 PM
Neverfly brought it up in another thread:

Open / Closed minded

Not sure if they qualify as cliche's, perhaps in some context - but they certainly are over-used.

Oh, that brings up another of my "favorties": "You laugh at me, but they laughed at Galileo too!" Um, yes and as Carl Sagan pointed out they also laughed at Bozo. What does that have to do with what you are saying?

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-20, 06:08 PM
Oh, that brings up another of my "favorties": "You laugh at me, but they laughed at Galileo too!"

Kind of goes back to the "X people can't be wrong!" cliche.

Fazor
2008-Aug-20, 07:00 PM
How about the one that all women are obsessed with shopping, particularly for shoes?

That one's rediculous! Just as many women prefer shopping for purses! Duh!!


*runs and hides*

mugaliens
2008-Aug-20, 08:52 PM
I don't allow cliches - Not on my watch.

mugaliens
2008-Aug-20, 09:39 PM
I don't think a 360-degree trunaround is a cliche. I think it's just a mistaken attempt at saying it's a 180-degree turn. Kind of like Yogi Berra's, "Baseball is 90% mental, the other half is physical."

My brother and I met Yogi Berra when I was a kid, playing little league. My brother played all-stars for a few years, and when he got a dog a few years back, he named it Yogi.

And yes, that dog is 90% mental, and the other half is physical.

Lianachan
2008-Aug-20, 10:16 PM
If I had £1 for every time I heard somebody use a dumb cliche...

weatherc
2008-Aug-21, 12:37 AM
If I had £1 for every time I heard somebody use a dumb cliche...I know how you feel. Sometimes I think that if I hear just one more cliché, I'm going to lose it.

pzkpfw
2008-Aug-21, 12:48 AM
I don't allow cliches - Not on my watch.

If I told you once, I told you a million times: I do not exagerate.

BlueSky
2008-Aug-21, 02:56 AM
You're working on my last good nerve

Then I just want to reply "See ya"!


Cliches
Good ways
To say what you mean
Mean what you say

~ Jimmy Buffett

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Aug-21, 12:20 PM
You've gotta be joking.

jokergirl
2008-Aug-21, 12:48 PM
While we are at female/male stereotypes:

Men automatically switch control to "that other brain" whenever a beautiful member of the gender they're attracted to enters the room, leaving no cognitive function intact.

;)

SeanF
2008-Aug-21, 01:05 PM
Men automatically switch control to "that other brain" whenever a beautiful member of the gender they're attracted to enters the room, leaving no cognitive function intact.
That's not a cliche, that's a fact. :D

Cliches don't bother me anymore. I just decided I was going to ignore them, and I do. You can do anything if you put your mind to it.

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-21, 01:14 PM
That's not a cliche, that's a fact. :D

Cliches don't bother me anymore. I just decided I was going to ignore them, and I do. You can do anything if you put your mind to it.

Just give it 110% and keep and open mind.

slang
2008-Aug-21, 01:18 PM
Stay tuned!

SeanF
2008-Aug-21, 01:19 PM
Just give it 110% and keep and open mind.
You're not the boss of me!

(Has that one been mentioned yet?)

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Aug-21, 02:18 PM
David and Goliath.

mike alexander
2008-Aug-21, 02:40 PM
"If you don't stop that you'll go blind"

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Aug-21, 03:25 PM
"If you don't stop that you'll go blind"
But practice makes perfect.

Whirlpool
2008-Aug-21, 03:28 PM
"Try and try until you die..err..succeed"

Gillianren
2008-Aug-21, 03:48 PM
My junior-high music teacher hated "Practice makes perfect." No, he countered, practice makes permanent. After all, you could be practicing wrong.

jokergirl
2008-Aug-22, 07:35 AM
I always had my secret bit of fun when politicians called some achievement a "quantum leap".

They sadly stopped completely very shortly after state TV sent a clip on primetime having a physicist explain that a quantum leap is something tiny and totally random.

;)

jokergirl
2008-Aug-22, 10:51 AM
Oh, also:

"The more you know..."

(not that "There aren't any dumb questions" is any better)

;)

mahesh
2008-Aug-22, 11:39 AM
'..., having said that, ...'

badzy
2008-Aug-22, 03:45 PM
"beauty is in the eye of the beholder"

Gillianren
2008-Aug-22, 04:13 PM
I always had my secret bit of fun when politicians called some achievement a "quantum leap".

They sadly stopped completely very shortly after state TV sent a clip on primetime having a physicist explain that a quantum leap is something tiny and totally random.

;)

I wouldn't phrase it as either. Neither, come to that, would Phil, who's fine with use of the term.

KaiYeves
2008-Aug-22, 08:50 PM
"The next best thing"
Which I parodied by refering to the Constellation program as "the best next thing".

Elenwen
2008-Aug-24, 07:22 PM
"Every cloud has a silver lining."

sarongsong
2008-Aug-25, 04:34 AM
I wouldn't phrase it as either. Neither...would Phil...What would Phil's phrase be?

Gillianren
2008-Aug-25, 05:12 AM
In the book Bad Astronomy, Phil says he has no problem with the term "quantum leap" to describe a leap as described, as a quantum leap is a leap from one state of being to another. It is not random. It goes from one specific place to another. Now, I'm not getting up to get my copy, and "badastronomy.com" now links to the Discover blog and not the site. (Does the site even exist anymore?) Ergo, I can't give you his exact wording. However, a quantum leap does refer to what is, for the quantum, a large jump.

Kaptain K
2008-Aug-25, 05:25 AM
"Every cloud has a silver lining."

Unless you're a pessimist. Then it's "Every silver lining has a dark cloud". :whistle:

Kaptain K
2008-Aug-25, 05:28 AM
In the book Bad Astronomy, Phil says he has no problem with the term "quantum leap" to describe a leap as described, as a quantum leap is a leap from one state of being to another. It is not random. It goes from one specific place to another. Now, I'm not getting up to get my copy, and "badastronomy.com" now links to the Discover blog and not the site. (Does the site even exist anymore?) Ergo, I can't give you his exact wording. However, a quantum leap does refer to what is, for the quantum, a large jump.

Here:
http://www.badastronomy.com/index.html

Whirlpool
2008-Aug-25, 07:02 AM
"there's a light at the end of the tunnel"

SkepticJ
2008-Aug-25, 08:02 AM
24/7 - instead of just saying something's always open, or whatever, in a non-numerical (and non-tool) fashion.

"Revolutionary!"

It's sad, revolutionary used to actually mean something - namely that something really was revolutionary.

"Green" as a synonym for sustainable technology/practices.

"New and improved."

If it's new, how can it already be improved?

jokergirl
2008-Aug-25, 11:04 AM
It may not be random states, but the physicist's point was that it happens randomly.
Not that that may not change (or our opinion of it has already changed) in the future.

Anyway, back to the clichés.

"You catch more flies with honey..."

;)

Donnie B.
2008-Aug-25, 11:15 AM
Anyway, back to the clichés.

"You catch more flies with honey..."

My response to that one has always been, "Why would I want to catch flies?" :sick:

Neverfly
2008-Aug-25, 11:20 AM
My response to that one has always been, "Why would I want to catch flies?" :sick:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2016/2172040185_bf620244d1.jpg

jokergirl
2008-Aug-25, 11:34 AM
Well, I do want to get the fruitflies out of my kitchen, but my flytraps always work better with something acidic in it than with just sugar.

Except for the ones that are just sticky yellow paper.

;)

sarongsong
2008-Aug-25, 12:04 PM
Here:
http://www.badastronomy.com/index.html"...[an error occurred while processing this directive]..." :(

farmerjumperdon
2008-Aug-25, 12:13 PM
Behind over teakettle.

Must be some sense to it from somewhere in the past, but trying to picture it is disturbing.

Jay200MPH
2008-Aug-25, 12:21 PM
Anyway, back to the clichés.

"You catch more flies with honey..."

;)

That one usualy ends with "...than with vinegar," which is WRONG becuase the other day I had to throw out a quarter-bottle of hard-to-get English malt vinegar. It had about twenty dead fruit flies floating in it because I accidently left it out for the weekend. That was annoying.

- J

Tog
2008-Aug-25, 12:23 PM
Would it make more sense if the first word were "donkey" instead of "behind". Then the expression could be from an event that knocked over a pack mule with enough force that it rolled completely over the tea kettle, which should be near the top of the stuff, both for easy access, and because they don't really pack well.

I'm not claiming that's the case, just pointing out that the first word in common use can have a second meaning that might change the image.

Jokergirl, if you can get Spaghettio's or something similar, fruit flies will pile in by the dozens. A fly strip hanging over it, or slightly down into leaves an almost disturbing pile of dead things.

Delvo
2008-Aug-25, 04:08 PM
I hate anything people start and don't finish. There are some that I didn't even know to their full length for years because I NEVER heard anyone say the second half until I asked, such as "If you build a better mousetrap...". Sometimes, even when I ask what the rest is, even the person who's saying it doesn't know! How can you say stuff without even knowing what you're saying or what it means yourself?!

Argos
2008-Aug-25, 04:18 PM
"Experiments with mouses have been promissing, but we´ll have to wait until tests are carried out in humans"

sarongsong
2008-Aug-25, 05:23 PM
"You know what I'm sayin' ?!"

SeanF
2008-Aug-25, 06:08 PM
"You know what I'm sayin' ?!"
"I'm just sayin'..."

HenrikOlsen
2008-Aug-26, 10:36 AM
"Experiments with mouses have been promissing, but we´ll have to wait until tests are carried out in humans"
That's not actually a cliche, there's lots of areas where mice are really bad predictors for how a substance behaves in humans.

geonuc
2008-Aug-26, 10:50 AM
I hate anything people start and don't finish. There are some that I didn't even know to their full length for years because I NEVER heard anyone say the second half until I asked, such as "If you build a better mousetrap...". Sometimes, even when I ask what the rest is, even the person who's saying it doesn't know! How can you say stuff without even knowing what you're saying or what it means yourself?!
..., the world will beat a path to your door.

Sometimes, saying the first part is enough to form the idea of the whole in people's minds. But, as you say, it would be nice if those who use parts of cliches know the whole.

Argos
2008-Aug-26, 03:06 PM
That's not actually a cliche,

CNN´s turned it into one. :)

tofu
2008-Aug-26, 03:42 PM
That one usualy ends with "...than with vinegar," which is WRONG becuase the other day I had to throw out a quarter-bottle of hard-to-get English malt vinegar. It had about twenty dead fruit flies floating in it because I accidently left it out for the weekend. That was annoying.

- J

I would just like to point out that to invalidate the "more with honey than with vinegar" thing you'd need to leave an open container of honey next to the vinegar and count the flies in each. You caught 20 flies with vinegar, but maybe you would have caught 40 with honey.

Anyway, I don't think this is an example of a cliche. I think it's a parable designed to teach something about persuasion.

KaiYeves
2008-Aug-26, 03:45 PM
An article about the Aztecs being titled "When Money Grew On Trees". To every writer who has done that- it's not funny anymore.

Larry Jacks
2008-Aug-26, 08:48 PM
This is more on the topic of stupid reporters than cliches, but stories about airliners making wild "plunging!" descents following the loss of cabin pressure annoy me. It's standard procedure for pressurized planes to quickly descend to a lower altitude following the loss of cabin pressure. Those oxygen masks that drop from the ceiling only have an air supply that will last a few minutes. The planes will - as a matter of course - quickly descend to 8,000 feet so the air inside the cabin is breathable. As but one example, there's this article (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A0DE0DB1F30F933A05753C1A9609482 60&sec=&spon=):

The accidental explosion of a Japanese gangster's grenade may have caused a Thai jetliner to make a violent 21,000-foot dive in which 62 people were injured, according to press reports here today.

The police said they had still not reached any conclusions, but investigators have said they believe an explosion occurred on the A-300 Airbus of Thai Airways International before a loss of pressure Sunday night caused the wild descent and an emergency landing at Osaka in western Japan.

Here's another one (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,410544,00.html) from today:

26 Hospitalized After Ryanair Jet's Midair Plunge, Emergency Landing

PARIS — A Ryanair plane made an emergency landing in central France after the cabin suddenly depressurized, French officials and the Irish carrier said Tuesday. Up to 26 people were hospitalized.

The Boeing 737 was carrying 141 British and 27 Spanish passengers plus six crew members from Bristol, England, to Gerona, Spain, before the urgent landing in Limoges, officials in the Haute-Vienne region said.

The "de-pressurization incident" caused the oxygen masks on board to deploy, a Ryanair statement said.

French officials said 26 people were hospitalized and suffered mostly from chest, nose and ear pain. Ryanair's statement said 16 people "complaining of ear ache" were taken to hospital.

The French officials said the plane lost 26,200 feet of altitude in five minutes before the landing, which the pilot requested.

That's exactly what the crew is supposed to do when a plane loses cabin pressure. So what exactly is the story here? "Crew does their job - plane lands safely"?

pzkpfw
2008-Aug-26, 09:01 PM
(

So what exactly is the story here? "Crew does their job - plane lands safely"?

We actually had a headline on a major news website a few days ago that read "Plane lands safely in Nelson". Of course I'm glad the people were Ok, but funny nonetheless.
)

slang
2008-Aug-26, 10:17 PM
Where there is smoke, there's fire!

KaiYeves
2008-Aug-27, 08:14 PM
"Is there intelligent life on other planets?"
"There's no intelligent life on this planet."
Okay, it was funny in Muppets in Space. When I was six. Now, it's not funny.

mfumbesi
2008-Aug-28, 07:29 AM
a penny for your thoughts..
My thoughts costs a tad more than a penny.

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-28, 12:26 PM
a penny for your thoughts..
My thoughts costs a tad more than a penny.

A penny for my thoughts is quite a bargain for just my two cents.

SeanF
2008-Aug-28, 01:20 PM
Man, if I had a nickel for every time I heard that one...

Click Ticker
2008-Aug-28, 01:22 PM
Here's a quarter. Call someone who cares.

Delvo
2008-Aug-28, 02:03 PM
a penny for your thoughts..
My thoughts costs a tad more than a penny.That's particularly annoying to someone I know whose nickname is Penny.

Delvo
2008-Aug-28, 04:17 PM
Here's one or a couple that really grate(s) on my nerves: a short comment in the form of one word or very short phrase, followed by "much?" or "anyone?". It just makes no frogging sense.

SeanF
2008-Aug-28, 04:39 PM
Worst. Cliche. Ever.

Matherly
2008-Aug-28, 05:02 PM
Man, if I had a nickel for every time I heard that one...

"If I had a Quarter everytime I said "If I had a Nickle..." I'd have six times as much hypothetical money"- Dr. Stephan T Colbert, DFA

SkepticJ
2008-Aug-28, 05:12 PM
"... if it kills me."

"... if it's the last thing I do!"

"You go, girl!"

slang
2008-Sep-02, 09:11 PM
Thank you, I'm here all week!

sarongsong
2008-Sep-02, 09:29 PM
"Just one quick question..."

KaiYeves
2008-Sep-02, 10:28 PM
Talking about Alice in Wonderland in discussions of quantum physics.

weatherc
2008-Sep-03, 01:18 AM
Here's one or a couple that really grate(s) on my nerves: a short comment in the form of one word or very short phrase, followed by "much?" or "anyone?". It just makes no frogging sense.Bitter, much?



;)

slang
2008-Sep-03, 09:49 AM
Low self-esteem

Gillianren
2008-Sep-03, 04:04 PM
Low self-esteem

Is there a difference between a cliche and a sad fact of life?

Click Ticker
2008-Sep-03, 04:46 PM
Is there a difference between a cliche and a sad fact of life?

Sad facts of life can become cliche if they are used as a crutch too often.

Suppose I should expand on that.

"Can't keep score at little league, might give the kids low self esteem."
"Can't make Billy repeat third grade even though he can't read, hate to give him low self esteem."

slang
2008-Sep-03, 05:29 PM
Is there a difference between a cliche and a sad fact of life?

It's used in talkshows whenever someone allegedly needs help or support or doesn't seem happy. The cliche is that it's often yelled from the audience when there's no reason to assume that the person has low self-esteem. I'd never suggest that low self-esteem can't be a bad problem in itself!

mfumbesi
2008-Sep-10, 11:01 AM
...its not over, until the fat lady sings..
This is wrong on two levels:
1. It discriminate against thin ladies, I mean is their singing supposed to be worthless.
2. What about the fat gentleman, what happens if a fat gentleman sings?

Larry Jacks
2008-Sep-10, 01:04 PM
"You can put lipstick on a pig but it's still a pig."

That may be an example of someone "jumping the shark."

tdvance
2008-Sep-10, 03:51 PM
The older cliche was actually better: "You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear".

Gillianren
2008-Sep-10, 03:58 PM
The cliche is properly "the opera ain't over 'til the fat lady sings." This, you will note, makes substantially more sense, as it implies a Wagnerian diva.

EricM407
2008-Sep-10, 07:16 PM
The cliche is properly "the opera ain't over 'til the fat lady sings." This, you will note, makes substantially more sense, as it implies a Wagnerian diva.

But, in "What's Opera, Doc?" Bugs Bunny is playing Brunnhilde, and his bone structure doesn't look to be larger than normal. Plus, it's over when he dies and gets carried off to Valhalla, not when he sings. Maybe I shouldn't rely on Warner Bros. cartoons for my opera knowledge though...

HenrikOlsen
2008-Sep-10, 10:41 PM
Have you seen the singers doing the Valkyries?
The archetypical Wagnerian Valkyrie fits better on a XB-70 than on a horse.

sarongsong
2008-Sep-10, 10:48 PM
"Hold on, Mr. President!" http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif
...it should be noted that a Southern proverb, "church ain't out until the fat lady sings," has been found in a 1976 publication. It's not certain which expression came first, and whether one was influenced by the other.
answers.yahoo.com (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061023032749AAfk66h)

Gillianren
2008-Sep-10, 11:56 PM
But, in "What's Opera, Doc?" Bugs Bunny is playing Brunnhilde, and his bone structure doesn't look to be larger than normal. Plus, it's over when he dies and gets carried off to Valhalla, not when he sings. Maybe I shouldn't rely on Warner Bros. cartoons for my opera knowledge though...

Chuck Jones admits that Bugs Bunny is not exactly the physical type to be a Wagnerian diva. However, check out the curves on the horse!

eric_marsh
2008-Sep-11, 02:44 AM
"Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger."

And often causes masssive internal injuries.

Yea that one gets me too. They forget to mention the possibility of being left crippled for life.

eric_marsh
2008-Sep-11, 02:45 AM
...its not over, until the fat lady sings..
This is wrong on two levels:
1. It discriminate against thin ladies, I mean is their singing supposed to be worthless.
2. What about the fat gentleman, what happens if a fat gentleman sings?

Not to mention that they don't say what happens if the fat lady sings in the first act.

eric_marsh
2008-Sep-11, 02:49 AM
But, in "What's Opera, Doc?" Bugs Bunny is playing Brunnhilde, and his bone structure doesn't look to be larger than normal. Plus, it's over when he dies and gets carried off to Valhalla, not when he sings. Maybe I shouldn't rely on Warner Bros. cartoons for my opera knowledge though...

Here's my tribute to Opera, Wagner and Bugs Bunny. It's getting kind of old and I think I need to get it re-inked.

http://homepage.mac.com/emarsh/.Pictures/bugs_tattoo.jpg

Whirlpool
2008-Sep-11, 04:54 AM
Is that a tattoo or what ?

:think:

closetgeek
2008-Sep-11, 03:00 PM
"a self-made man" :lol:

Who worships his creator???

The one I hate the most and someone always has to say it when you are nursing a broken heart is;

"There are plenty of fish in the sea"

Matherly
2008-Sep-11, 03:10 PM
Yea that one gets me too. They forget to mention the possibility of being left crippled for life.

I think Nietzsche was refering to mental strength, not physical strength.

Gillianren
2008-Sep-11, 04:12 PM
I think Nietzsche was refering to mental strength, not physical strength.

Still wrong, though.

Matherly
2008-Sep-11, 04:36 PM
Still wrong, though.

That's open to debate.

Gillianren
2008-Sep-11, 04:48 PM
Speaking as someone deeply emotionally scarred and weakened by past events, I don't find it so.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 04:53 PM
Speaking as someone deeply emotionally scarred and weakened by past events, I don't find it so.

Speaking as someone who could have been deeply emotionally scarred and weakened by past events had I chosen to allow it, I do.

closetgeek
2008-Sep-11, 04:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matherly
I think Nietzsche was refering to mental strength, not physical strength.

Still wrong, though.


That's open to debate.

Not necessarily wrong, as Matherly says; there are times when bad things happen and a person is left feeling weaker. Perhaps something else happens to push them over the edge, possibly kill themselves or just flat out, give up on life. However, in many cases, whether it be a physical or an emotional experience, having survived the incident, a person knows what they are capable of handling and are able to face future events. I hate to use the weaslers but people vary way to much to say whether it is wrong or not. You can give two people the very same set of circumstances and where one would say, "I've come a long way, baby," the other could say, "Cut me some slack already."

Gillianren
2008-Sep-11, 05:13 PM
Speaking as someone who could have been deeply emotionally scarred and weakened by past events had I chosen to allow it, I do.

I happen to think there are some coping mechanisms that let people "choose not to be weakened" that are themselves detrimental and leave people not as strong as they think they are. Like having a chip on one's shoulder.

tdvance
2008-Sep-11, 05:20 PM
well, there's the "swim or else" method of teaching someone to swim--throw them in deep water and walk away. (that's how I was taught to teach, actually--they gave me students and a textbook and said "teach"--it took a few iterations before I got a working pattern going). That's sometimes used as a metaphor for dealing with psychological issues through "flooding" (overstimulating till you're desensitized)--if you fear the dark, be locked in a dark room till you get over it, etc. It works for some, but makes others worse instead of better. I don't think it's understood enough to know exactly when and how the method works when it does versus when it doesn't.

At least, that's what I was told in Psych 101.

So to modify the expression: "what doesn't make me weaker makes me stronger" :)

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 05:24 PM
I happen to think there are some coping mechanisms that let people "choose not to be weakened" that are themselves detrimental and leave people not as strong as they think they are. Like having a chip on one's shoulder.

Gillianren.

I will allow myself the luxury of being blunt a moment.
What you 'happen to think' does not set the standard for reality.
Not everyone lives by your standard. If it could be called such. It seems to be more a philosophy than a standard.

Not everyone has a brain that functions in the manner that yours does.

I have had the hard life too. And I DO NOT appreciate your insinuation that I am so weak minded and incapable that I can't handle it just because you feel like yours made you weaker and left scars.
Coping Mechanisms that cause more harm?
Whatever.


I have scars too. Mental and Physical.
But I'm strong enough to carry them with pride. They are badges.

I have old wounds and old pains too. And I know that I will be facing new ones as well.
But getting through the old ones provided me the experience, the knowledge and the strength to face the new ones as they come up.

But you lack the privilege- the Right- to question my or anyone elses scars. Maybe you have yet to confront and deal with your own. But that doesn't put everyone else in the same boat as you.

Many of us have moved past all that.

closetgeek
2008-Sep-11, 05:35 PM
Is anyone else curious to hear about the scars or is it just me?

Donnie B.
2008-Sep-11, 05:36 PM
Neverfly.

This thread is about cliches that get on people's nerves. If Gillian's experience is that "whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger" is invalid, then it's perfectly reasonable that it might annoy her when people use it.

Whether or not it may sometimes be true doesn't seem like a good reason for you to jump on her for pointing out it's sometimes false and, therefore, annoys her.

Moose
2008-Sep-11, 05:42 PM
Yeah. Nietzsche was wrong. What doesn't kill you most definitely can (and frequently does) fail to make you stronger. Often quite the opposite. Both on the physical and mental sense.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 05:45 PM
Neverfly.

This thread is about cliches that get on people's nerves. If Gillian's experience is that "whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger" is invalid, then it's perfectly reasonable that it might annoy her when people use it.

Whether or not it may sometimes be true doesn't seem like a good reason for you to jump on her for pointing out it's sometimes false and, therefore, annoys her.

Actually...
I responded to her claim that it was "Not Debatable" after she was given a clarification upon the original Cliche.

So your entire point is irrelevant.

Your next point is that I jumped on her. I don't see it that way and if you can justify her responses then you can justify my responses with the exact same argument and wording.

So that's irrelevant too.

Now- if you want to complain that the thread was Hijacked- I will understand that and step out of a hijacking. But other than that- nothing else you said bears much relevance on what was actually discussed.
If Gillianren can voice her thoughts- Then so can I buddy.

Moose
2008-Sep-11, 05:46 PM
Whether or not it may sometimes be true doesn't seem like a good reason for you to jump on her for pointing out it's sometimes false and, therefore, annoys her.

Agreed.

Nev, what you've just said, and more importantly, the manner in which you've said it was quite uncalled for.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 05:47 PM
Yeah. Nietzsche was wrong. What doesn't kill you most definitely can (and frequently does) fail to make you stronger. Often quite the opposite. Both on the physical and mental sense.

I can tell a great many experiences that have not killed me and have either made me physically stronger, mentally stronger or both.

I agree that the cliche is a bit annoying. But It's also very general.
Claiming that there is just one side is just plain goofy.

Moose
2008-Sep-11, 05:50 PM
Claiming that there is just one side is just plain goofy.

If you read back, Nev, nobody, and I mean nobody suggested otherwise.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 05:50 PM
Agreed.

Nev, what you've just said, and more importantly, the manner in which you've said it was quite uncalled for.

No Moose.
What Gillianren implies by claiming that we are all incapable of handling the hardships in life is uncalled for.

I did not live my years learning and coping with major hardships in life to hear someone haughtily dismiss it just because she does not find coping as easy to do.
That's her take- But I encourage that human beings are perfectly capable of Getting Up and not calling it quits when things hurt.

If you find that disagreeable- Then too bad.

Quitters win nothing.

This entire forum is devoted to the human nature that keeps going and doesn't behave in that manner.
Including defending those that lost their lives (Three men) and who braved the unknown to land on the Moon.
It's just as offensive when an HB comes and discounts their efforts.

Gillianrens comments discount ALL of our efforts in daily living.


If you read back, Nev, nobody, and I mean nobody suggested otherwise.
Read back and double Check Moose. No one came out and said it Directly perhaps...

But no matter what- You guys will just paint me as "the Bad Guy" who is picking on Poor Gillianren:rolleyes:

So whatever.

Matherly
2008-Sep-11, 05:57 PM
I can tell a great many experiences that have not killed =me and have either made me physically stronger, mentally stronger or both.

I agree that the cliche is a bit annoying. But It's also very general.
Claiming that there is just one side is just plain goofy.

*TWEEEEEEEET*

"Time out!"

O.K., I opened a can of worms I did not want too.

Let's drop it and move on, please.

Um... let's see... new cliche...

Oh, I know.

"People are to impatient to listen to quiet"- Every scene had to be filled to the brim with noise, unneccisary (and usually bad) dialoge, and other aurial garbage.

Appears in both Film & T.V. (because "Samurai Jack" was never popular :rolleyes: ) and music (I'm lookin' at YOU, Phil Spector)

Moose
2008-Sep-11, 05:57 PM
What Gillianren implies by claiming that we are all incapable of handling the hardships in life is uncalled for.

She didn't say or imply any such thing, Nev.

I think you need to take a deep breath and rev down a bit (maybe more than a bit.) Your behavior right now isn't endearing.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 06:06 PM
She didn't say or imply any such thing, Nev.

I think you need to take a deep breath and rev down a bit (maybe more than a bit.) Your behavior right now isn't endearing.

She did Both, actually.

First, she said that hardships only cause weakness mentally and physically.
By Twice declaring that an idea was "Wrong".

When someone else said that was debatable, she replied with a synopsis of her experience and then declared that it is NOT debatable.

This not only covers her own experience, but it also means that if that issue is not debatable, then it covers Everyone Else As well.

So by these statements, she has said that it Is Only One Sided and that that side is that we can only be weakened by hardships.

Now- if you want to claim I am wrong simply for disagreeing with these kinds of statements and Supporting those statements and for clarifying the issue- Then I can only wonder if perhaps you are being a bit biased.

Unless I just have "A Chip On My Shoulder?" (http://www.bautforum.com/1321580-post162.html):whistle:

Moose
2008-Sep-11, 06:22 PM
This isn't about you disagreeing, Nev. You're allowed to disagree with whatever you like on whatever basis you like. But you can be polite while doing so, surely.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 06:29 PM
This isn't about you disagreeing, Nev. You're allowed to disagree with whatever you like on whatever basis you like. But you can be polite while doing so, surely.

I was blunt- But I was perfectly polite.
I made no ad Homs nor did I bring up the Multitude of other threads in which she has repeatedly made these same types of claims.

I addressed the claims that were made- in the same manner as we address the claims made that we did not go to the Moon, that the LHC will kill us all- etc.

Now, Gillianren may clarify or even modify her claim- but as it stands now- That claim creates uncertainty as to where:
Olympians come from.
Astronauts come from
Doctors come from.
Soldiers come from.

The list is very extensive.

Because we DO get stronger - that is one of the most fundamental and crucial aspects of humanity.

Claiming that I was impolite when I disagree with someones claim strongly seems a bit odd to me.
Especially considering: Anytime that I disagree with Gillianren on such issues- The same people suddenly step in like the bodyGuard Clique and ignore all her statements and repeatedly attack my own.

I find THAT odd too.

Matherly
2008-Sep-11, 06:34 PM
Um... boy Phil Spector annoys me

(Matherly looks areound hopefully)

C'mon people, back me up!

closetgeek
2008-Sep-11, 06:43 PM
And I am suing baut for emotional distress because I worked really hard at coming up with a nicely worded post that would not only take the edge off this conversation but also take the handlebar mustache off of Neverfly and low and behold, the site stopped working. Apparently it was just me because the conversation seemed to flourish during my time out. I am now sure it is a conspiracy to silence me.
To give the ultra simplified version, arguing the ligitimacy of a cliche is about as pointless as arguing which color is prettier, especially when the cliche is in reference to how an individual can handle things.
However, and I am not saying Gillianren did intent to make it sound as though Neverfly had a chip on his shoulder, but it did seem that way and my response may have been a bit short if I felt a personal attack on me first. Can we all kiss and make up?

Moose
2008-Sep-11, 06:45 PM
I was blunt- But I was perfectly polite.

You weren't. But I'm not interested in arguing with you about it any further. Behave how you like. I'm not your mother.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 06:48 PM
Handlebar mustache?:neutral:

closetgeek
2008-Sep-11, 06:52 PM
Handlebar mustache?:neutral:

Lol, you know, the bad guy twisting his handlebar mustache, plotting to kill innocent people for no reason??

Neverfly
2008-Sep-11, 06:59 PM
Lol, you know, the bad guy twisting his handlebar mustache, plotting to kill innocent people for no reason??

Ohhhh. LOL ok...

I would never even have thought of that...:doh:

HEY! Is that guy a Cliche?

closetgeek
2008-Sep-11, 07:13 PM
Ohhhh. LOL ok...

I would never even have thought of that...:doh:

HEY! Is that guy a Cliche?


he is now!

Click Ticker
2008-Sep-11, 07:15 PM
But it was such a nice thread.

Yet another case of he said, she said.

Cliche anyone?

In all fairness to Neverfly - it certainly read as though he was told he was in denial over his weaknesses and walks around with a chip on his shoulder.

In all fairness to Gillianren - Neverfly did nothing to hide any chip that may or may not reside on his shoulder.

My thread - I call last word! (Is that a rule or not?)

Now back to your regularly scheduled programming...

mugaliens
2008-Sep-11, 08:09 PM
"There you go again..."

Delvo
2008-Sep-12, 02:28 AM
That original Nietzsche quote was written in absolute terms: not that some things (implicitly, bad things) which don't kill you make you stronger, but that all of them do. Thus, it can be disproven by a single contrary example, no matter how many or how few supporting examples there are.

sarongsong
2008-Sep-12, 05:42 AM
I think Nietzsche...who initially wrote, in Maxims and Arrows (http://www.geocities.com/thenietzschechannel/twi.htm#maxim):
...8

Out of life's school of war.— What does not destroy me, makes me stronger.
...and did he ever love to write! Unpublished and published Nietzsche (http://www.geocities.com/thenietzschechannel/ntexteng.htm)

Whirlpool
2008-Sep-13, 03:37 AM
Nietszhe - sounds like Nai Cha?

http://lh6.ggpht.com/ytpfrancis/SC7-OnnBsjI/AAAAAAAADYQ/vFZj5G1AQyU/s400/DSC00243.JPG

Iced Milk Tea

jokergirl
2008-Sep-15, 08:18 AM
I hate that "The more you know, the less you ask"-slogan that I often see quoted on the internet.

From my experience, the more I knew, the more I realized what I didn't know yet and what pertinent questions I could ask.

After all, there are no stupid questions...
(as everyone who has had to deal with woo-woos will be sure to know! :lol: )

;)

slang
2008-Sep-15, 08:29 AM
Scientists are saying ... [insert outrageous claim]

mfumbesi
2008-Sep-15, 08:42 AM
Real women don't wear size <insert small size>........
I don't know about you guys out there in USA/Europe/Asia but locally women come in all shapes and sizes. Really even size 6,4,2 I mean all sizes.(no eating disorders either just different metabolism)

Whirlpool
2008-Sep-15, 10:28 AM
" Less talk , Less mistakes"

And recently , fresh from D' Boss:

"It's a Business Decision"

where they usually use it for "Downsizing Employees".

:wall:

PeteG
2008-Sep-15, 11:42 AM
Scientists are saying ... [insert outrageous claim]

Haha, that one gets me too.

Moose
2008-Sep-15, 02:39 PM
Scientists are saying ... [insert outrageous claim]

Yup. Especially when it turns out to be two cranks, self-educated in a completely irrelevant field, who can't even accurately summarize the applicable law of physics (often Thermodynamics.2) they claim to have overthrown.

What really gets my goat is despite claims to be treating both sides as equally meritorious of air time (a fallacy in itself), the reality is that the media routinely gives air time at a 98%-2% split in favor of the cranks.


...For the skeptical counterpoint, here's Dr. Token Scientist.

Scientist: "Hi. I'm Token Scientist, PhD."

And now, back to the free infomercial masquerading as a news piece that we're reading straight off the press release the nice people from ACME[tm] emailed us.

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Sep-15, 06:30 PM
Neverfly and Gillianren fight like an old married couple.
(ducks and covers)

Click Ticker
2008-Sep-15, 07:54 PM
Is it crossing the line of religious talk to say, "It's a miracle!" is cliche?

Just because something doesn't happen very often, doesn't make it miraculous. To me a miracle would be something that violated the laws of physics.

pzkpfw
2008-Sep-15, 09:00 PM
Radio stations here are starting to promote "Rocktober" competitions.

Neverfly
2008-Sep-15, 09:25 PM
Neverfly and Gillianren fight like an old married couple.
(ducks and covers)

It gets worse.

You and I fight like one too...:neutral:

closetgeek
2008-Sep-15, 09:47 PM
Is it crossing the line of religious talk to say, "It's a miracle!" is cliche?

Just because something doesn't happen very often, doesn't make it miraculous. To me a miracle would be something that violated the laws of physics.

I ran in the street and screamed that it was a miracle that I actually got a cabbage patch doll, back in the day. That defied laws as far as I am concerned as he was bent on always buying the cheap knockoff.

KaiYeves
2008-Sep-16, 01:09 AM
"Kids don't care about (insert important thing here)"
One thing kids DO care about is unfair stereotypes!

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Sep-16, 06:19 AM
It gets worse.

You and I fight like one too...:neutral:
You found me out, how about trip to boston to get hitched.:lol:

Neverfly
2008-Sep-16, 06:22 AM
You found me out, how about trip to boston to get hitched.:lol:
Vegas.
What happens there, stays there.

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Sep-16, 06:28 AM
Vegas.
What happens there, stays there.
No thanks I hate the heat.

Tog
2008-Sep-16, 06:38 AM
No thanks I hate the heat.

"But it's a dry heat."

(to tie up the tangent with the OP):lol:

Yes, it's dry, but it's 40 freaking degrees above my comfort zone, so yeah... I don't like it.

Gillianren
2008-Sep-16, 04:10 PM
Oh, I hate that one! Yeah, it's a dry heat, but it's 104 degrees F, which is still pretty lousy.

Donnie B.
2008-Sep-16, 04:56 PM
At 104 degrees, one is not dry for long.

Gillianren
2008-Sep-16, 05:05 PM
Besides, having lived in LA, I can promise you that 50% humidity is not "dry" heat anyway, for all some people here call it that.

Matherly
2008-Sep-16, 05:25 PM
O.K., having lived in Houston, TX and currently living in Phoenix, AZ I have to defend the "dry heat".

It does make a difference!

Plus, cities with low humidity tend not to have hurricanes. My mom still has no power and probibly won't for at least another week. (side note: everyone is fine, no damage worth telling the insurance company about, and plenty of food and water)

Tog
2008-Sep-17, 06:40 AM
O.K., having lived in Houston, TX and currently living in Phoenix, AZ I have to defend the "dry heat".

It does make a difference!

If I'm outside, 70 F is about right. 75 is at the upper end of my comfort zone. I went from Utah, to Atlanta (on my way to Anniston, AL for basic training) one day at the end of August. I do agree that it makes a difference. I walked out of the airport and it felt like someone wrapped my head up in one of those steamed barber towels. Everything was sticky all night long. It took about 2 months to figure out why there was rice in the salt shakers.

I'm just saying that when it hits 100+, I don't care if it's a "dry" heat. It sucks. ;)

slang
2008-Sep-17, 07:23 AM
"Nice weather, huh?"

closetgeek
2008-Sep-17, 12:14 PM
"Nice weather, huh?"

Is that a cliche or a desperate attempt to break the uncomfortable silence

slang
2008-Sep-17, 12:37 PM
Yes. To both. And the timing of posting of the cliche was intended to be moderately witty.

ineluki
2008-Sep-17, 12:54 PM
Free speech allows me to spout any kind of nonsense unchallenged

Extravoice
2008-Sep-17, 02:21 PM
O.K., having lived in Houston, TX and currently living in Phoenix, AZ I have to defend the "dry heat".

It does make a difference!


There is no doubt it does make a difference. We visited some friends in Phoenix a couple years back, and as long as I stayed in the shade, I could handle temperatures that were much higher than I could handle with high humidity. That said, anytime you need to wrap your hand in a towel to open a car door, it is too hot.

Interestingly, on a side trip to San Diego, our friend from Phoenix kept complaining about the humidity, which still seemed very low to us. I guess the humidity is relative ;)

HenrikOlsen
2008-Sep-17, 05:35 PM
Free speech allows me to spout any kind of nonsense unchallenged
That is not only cliché, it' s so fundamentally wrong that I'm at the point of demanding mandatory teaching on how the constitution actually applies when you're looking at the intertubes.

Moose
2008-Sep-17, 05:46 PM
We visited some friends in Phoenix a couple years back, and as long as I stayed in the shade, I could handle temperatures that were much higher than I could handle with high humidity.

Yeah, it's not so much that it's okay when the humidity is low, too hot is still too hot. But high humidity makes too hot (and too cold) so much worse. Given the choice, I prefer dry and shady.

tdvance
2008-Sep-17, 05:57 PM
OT: speaking of free speech, it's National Constitution Day in the US, and I've read the constitution today, have you :) Only one surprise--I never realized an amendment was ratified as recently as 1992--I don't recall it being in the news then. It was 202 years between its proposal and ratification.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Sep-17, 06:41 PM
Well, seeing how many in a general poll understands even the first, having a constitution day does make some kind of sense.

Gillianren
2008-Sep-17, 11:29 PM
It's funny--the Founding Fathers felt, in general, that it was far more important than the fourth of July, on which nothing half so significant actually happened. (Look it up if you don't believe me.)

Extravoice
2008-Oct-05, 08:24 PM
Joe sixpack.

BigDon
2008-Oct-05, 10:46 PM
Racial stereotyping.

How many races do you Scots have?

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-07, 01:32 AM
"Kids are lazy."

Um, not with all the homework you give us we aren't.

Extravoice
2008-Oct-07, 12:35 PM
"Kids are lazy."

"Well, in my day..."

tdvance
2008-Oct-07, 04:09 PM
Homework!!! In our day, homework had to be chiseled in stone! You have it easy....

Click Ticker
2008-Oct-07, 04:27 PM
Homework!!! In our day, homework had to be chiseled in stone! You have it easy....

There's a bus stop two blocks from my sons school. In my day we had to walk ten miles to school in three feet of snow, up hill both ways!

SeanF
2008-Oct-07, 07:47 PM
Homework!!! In our day, homework had to be chiseled in stone! You have it easy....
You had chisels?

weatherc
2008-Oct-07, 07:59 PM
There's a bus stop two blocks from my sons school. In my day we had to walk ten miles to school in three feet of snow, up hill both ways!Barefoot. And backwards, so that we could see if there were any bears coming after us.

closetgeek
2008-Oct-08, 12:26 PM
Barefoot. And backwards, so that we could see if there were any bears coming after us.

Feet? You guys had feet?


[KaiYeves] "Kids are lazy."

Um, not with all the homework you give us we aren't.

I have NEVER accused kids of being lazy. Quite the opposite...mine have a backup motor.

weatherc
2008-Oct-08, 12:46 PM
Feet? You guys had feet?
Not at first. We had to work to get our feet! And we considered ourselves lucky to be able to afford them!

BigDon
2008-Oct-08, 08:06 PM
Barefoot. And backwards, so that we could see if there were any bears coming after us.

Back in 1892 in Oregon my great grandfather (who was 12 at the time) and his little sister, (Aunt Leola) were late for school. He had to stop halfway there and go home to get his .22. Seems there was a mountain lion sitting on a branch over the trail. (They give themselves away because they let their tails hang down. Deer, their main prey, don't know this. Twelve year olds raised in mountain lion country do.) Oh yeah, it was snowing.

Since it was still there when they came back he had to shoot it. Went on to school with the rifle because he didn't want to be even later. Though as he told me, "The grown-ups did make a bit of a fuss. But it weren't nothin'. The secret to killing a mountain lion with a .22 is to shoot him in the nose!" And I remember him pushing in his own nose with his forefinger when he told me that. He said it was a very big male in excess of 200 pounds. Part of the fuss. (I knew at one time but I don't want to make up a number) He passed away when I was 12, nearly a hundred years old.

Larry Jacks
2008-Oct-08, 08:14 PM
My maternal grandfather died 4 years ago at age 96. He told me stories about the challenges of raising 5 children during the Great Depression in rural Alabama. He was a sharecropper who spent much of the time looking at the wrong end of a mule. Back then, if you needed a tooth pulled, a dentist would charge $1 or 50 cents if you skipped the anesthetic. He knew quite a few men who couldn't afford the anesthetic. Times were tough back then but so apparently were the people.

We can laugh about some of the exaggerations people told (10 miles each way to school, uphill, etc) but there were a lot of real life hardships back then. I doubt if any of us can fully appreciate just how bad those times were. Every time I hear the pundits talk about a new depression, I think of my grandfather. Let's hope it never gets even remotely that bad ever again.

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-08, 09:13 PM
"When I was a kid, we swam five miles to school and carved our scuba tanks out of wood." -David Doubliet.

Nadme
2008-Oct-08, 09:45 PM
"Age is just a number."

To immature elderly people I suppose...

Jay200MPH
2008-Oct-10, 12:32 PM
Ooh, I've got one: referring to police as "LEOs." There is already a perfectly valid word for this - "police" - which is one syllable less when said out loud - so there is really no need to introduce yet another worthless acronym into the beleaguered English language. There's even a one syllable word that's the same number of letters - "cops" - if you don't mind being a little slangy. Stop it with the LEO crap. Please.

(Not only that, but it raises my libertarian hackles as a linguistic attempt to militarize the civilian police. But that's a little too political to go into on here.)

Just say "no" to acronysation.

- J

tdvance
2008-Oct-10, 05:13 PM
In the same vein (uh, I think it's that "vein/vane" in the expression)--

administrative assistants for secretaries--I have a single-pair of points sample to "prove" it doesn't help: UVA Math Department calls them "secretaries", and when I visited last year, they were the same people as when I began grad school in 1992. Here, they are called "administrative assistants" and we rarely keep one for more than a year, sometimes 2. So, clearly changing the name isn't a huge boost in job satisfaction!

Also, our guards are called "security officers"--we had a manager for "security officers" actually get offended at someone mentioning the "guard" at the front gate--but gee, they stand guard, they're guards!

Wait until kids get in trouble for saying "teacher" instead of "Educational Specialist". Or calling their "X-Chromosome Immediate Ancestor" "mom".

Gillianren
2008-Oct-10, 07:21 PM
It is indeed "vein."

I'm with you about both of those. They're silly.

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-11, 02:37 AM
Wait until kids get in trouble for saying "teacher" instead of "Educational Specialist". Or calling their "X-Chromosome Immediate Ancestor" "mom".
It's currently only "education(al) specialist" if they're in space, but...

darkhunter
2008-Oct-11, 03:25 PM
Ooh, I've got one: referring to police as "LEOs." There is already a perfectly valid word for this - "police" - which is one syllable less when said out loud - so there is really no need to introduce yet another worthless acronym into the beleaguered English language. There's even a one syllable word that's the same number of letters - "cops" - if you don't mind being a little slangy. Stop it with the LEO crap. Please.

(Not only that, but it raises my libertarian hackles as a linguistic attempt to militarize the civilian police. But that's a little too political to go into on here.)

Just say "no" to acronysation.

- JPolice are now called "Low Earth Orbits" (LEOs)? Or are they lions? (Lion police officers would be cool). :)

Acronyms have their place. If there is a chance that an acronym could be misunderstood, then that is NOT the place.

We have the local police department here, and tey have a program called "COPs" (Citizens On Patrol) where local community members act as a sort of mobile neighborhood watch and police augmentees for large events.

tdvance
2008-Oct-11, 03:57 PM
"Police are now called "Low Earth Orbits" (LEOs)? Or are they lions? (Lion police officers would be cool). "

well, Nivin has Kzinti police officers on some human planets--they're like lions that walk on two feet.

darkhunter
2008-Oct-11, 04:01 PM
"Police are now called "Low Earth Orbits" (LEOs)? Or are they lions? (Lion police officers would be cool). "

well, Nivin has Kzinti police officers on some human planets--they're like lions that walk on two feet.

I've lways thought of the Kzinti as more a or a tiger. ;)

As this is a cliche thread:

It never rains, but it pours. What about the drizzle that we mostly get where I live?

Ozzy
2008-Oct-12, 03:20 AM
'boys will be boys"

used to justify bad behaviour as unavoidable due to testosterone.

'its company policy"

used to excuse stupid, unfair practices

agingjb
2008-Oct-12, 08:23 AM
"taxpayer's money"

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-12, 05:19 PM
"taxpayer's money"
And similarly, "Your tax dollars at work" being used in a negative sense.

Extravoice
2008-Oct-12, 10:07 PM
"taxpayer's money"

Actually, I kinda like that one. It reminds people where the money comes from.

Although I have to admit that it is too-often used in a negative sense. That is, it's referred to as the "taxpayer's money" only when the government wastes it.

Extravoice
2008-Oct-12, 10:08 PM
"Wall street to Main Street."

That one is getting a little overused these days.

Bearded One
2008-Oct-12, 11:57 PM
In the book Bad Astronomy, Phil says he has no problem with the term "quantum leap" to describe a leap as described, as a quantum leap is a leap from one state of being to another. It is not random. It goes from one specific place to another. Now, I'm not getting up to get my copy, and "badastronomy.com" now links to the Discover blog and not the site. (Does the site even exist anymore?) Ergo, I can't give you his exact wording. However, a quantum leap does refer to what is, for the quantum, a large jump.I've always disagreed with the BA on that one. To me a "quantum leap" is the smallest change necessary to make a difference. If you say a car is a "quantum leap" above the previous model that could just mean they used a 6 mm bolt to hold on the mirror instead of a 4 mm like the old model.

Extravoice
2008-Oct-13, 11:57 AM
This morning my local newspaper had two articles on the front page where the authors felt the need to use the cliche "perfect storm" to describe the thing they were talking about.

Maybe my local journalists need some kind of cliche Thesaurus. ;)

jokergirl
2008-Oct-13, 12:09 PM
I've lways thought of the Kzinti as more a or a tiger. ;)

As this is a cliche thread:

It never rains, but it pours. What about the drizzle that we mostly get where I live?


I've never gotten so much flak over a drawing than when I drew the Ringworld characters and made the Kzinti have a huge fluffy head.


Also:
"A jug! A jug never rains, but it pours!"

;)

weatherc
2008-Oct-13, 12:29 PM
I've never gotten so much flak over a drawing than when I drew the Ringworld characters and made the Kzinti have a huge fluffy head.
I have a feeling that Niven himself would approve of that. In the foreword to one of his books (Footfall, I think), he mentioned how when partnering with Pournelle, he liked to toss in absurd elements, while Pournelle was more the "straight" man of the team. Making the Kzinti look fluffy and cute, but having vicious tempers, sounds like Niven's way of thinking.