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EvilEye
2008-Aug-18, 09:02 PM
I was looking at the discovery of 2006 SQ372, but in watching the animation, I saw something else.

Here's the page: http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~dhw/SDSS08/ssfigs.html

But I saw this....


http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn268/EvilEyeMonster/0-1.jpg

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn268/EvilEyeMonster/0-2.jpg

antoniseb
2008-Aug-18, 09:10 PM
Good eye. I'll show this to my kids.

tracer
2008-Aug-19, 12:07 AM
That spot looks awfully dark blue. My first instinct is to say it's either a photographic anomaly, or a little bit of data-loss incurred in the process of digitally compressing the image.

EvilEye
2008-Aug-19, 12:51 AM
It may have to do with the processing when the original was turned into a .gif and even worse when I made the jpgs.

But they are there in the originals as well. I didn't enhance anything.

There are other things appearing and disapearing in the photos too.. especially toward the right side... but they don't look like they are "moving".

EvilEye
2008-Aug-19, 12:53 AM
Maybe it is a small comet?

It's not following the right path.

tracer
2008-Aug-19, 02:03 AM
But they are there in the originals as well. I didn't enhance anything.

There are other things appearing and disapearing in the photos too.. especially toward the right side... but they don't look like they are "moving".

This leads me to believe that the "originals" you're using were also subjected to lossy image compression. Remember, most of the space images made available on the Web for public viewing aren't going to be the original images, which are huge (both from a pixel-count standpoint and a megabyte standpoint).

EvilEye
2008-Aug-19, 03:48 AM
Understood, but why would there be ...

Yeah I get it. But then why are most of the other stars in the (other 2) picture(s) unaffected?

Neverfly
2008-Aug-19, 05:07 AM
It is the Smurf Homeworld.

There is currently a Governmental and international conspiracy to supress knowledge of the existence of that world.

You see... Earth has both wizards and cats.

Jeff Root
2008-Aug-19, 06:07 AM
I don't readily notice any other spots that are so blue. That makes me, too,
suspect that it is some kind of image anomaly. If so, the nature of that kind
of spot is known to the people who analyze the images. Please persue this
until you find out what the cause is.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

EvilEye
2008-Aug-25, 09:24 PM
I don't even know where to begin looking. I can see the plane of the solar system, but I can't indentify anything. I don't know where to start.

It would have helped if they had identified some other known stars.

shon menlorex
2008-Nov-22, 01:06 PM
As to how 2006 SQ372 got its unusual orbit, University of Washington graduate student Nathan Kaib, another member of the discovery team, has some ideas (http://pawst.com/post/588129-not-using-metric-caused-the-loss-of-an-important-mars-probe-in-1999-vote-this-up-if-you-think-an-astronomy-site-as-important-as-space-com-should-stop-writing-distances-in-miles) based on his computer simulations of the object.

01101001
2008-Nov-22, 05:42 PM
As to how 2006 SQ372 got its unusual orbit, University of Washington graduate student Nathan Kaib, another member of the discovery team, has some ideas (http://pawst.com/post/588129-not-using-metric-caused-the-loss-of-an-important-mars-probe-in-1999-vote-this-up-if-you-think-an-astronomy-site-as-important-as-space-com-should-stop-writing-distances-in-miles) based on his computer simulations of the object.

Why the goofy URL: http://pawst.com/post/588129-not-using-metric-caused-the-loss-of-an-important-mars-probe-in-1999-vote-this-up-if-you-think-an-astronomy-site-as-important-as-space-com-should-stop-writing-distances-in-miles?

Why not give us the direct URL: http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080818-new-comet.html? http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080818-new-comet.html

2006 SQ372 was previously discussed, at the time of its announcement back in August, in BAUT Forum topic Star? Planet? What? (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/77824-star-planet-what.html) -- though that's mainly about some other spot on the images -- and also in topic Orbital calculations (http://www.bautforum.com/questions-answers/77855-orbital-calculations.html).

This is in the Q&A section. Do you have a question? Or did you mean to put it in another section, like Astronomy? (I've pointed this out to moderators, so someone might move it.)

PraedSt
2008-Nov-22, 06:47 PM
Ok, why can't I see it? :(

01101001
2008-Nov-22, 07:10 PM
Ok, why can't I see it? :(

In images or by eyeball?

If you're looking in the sky, it's a long ways away and very dim. Maybe get a bigger 'scope. Make sure you're looking at night (and in the right place).

In images, I think Ohio State University: sq372 discovery animation (http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~dhw/SDSS08/sq372_discovery_anim.gif) might help. Look near the tip of the big white arrow.

Wikipedia: 2006 SQ372 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_SQ372) has more information and links.

Edit: Oh. I should have asked: which "it"? The comet? The blue speck EvilEye cares about? Above, I presumed comet. But the answers are similar: the blue speck is near the tip of the handdrawn white arrow. In the 10-23 image. I don't think it appears in the 10-21 image though the arrow does. And if it did apppear in the 10-21 image, it brightened by 10-23 and then either accelerated like hell, or dimmed to nothing, to avoid being in the 10-28 image.

Don Alexander
2008-Nov-22, 08:49 PM
I'd say the blue object could be real, and something transient that only shows up in one color, namely the filter which was assigned blue in the RGB images - which are probably composed of sloan g*r*i* images.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-23, 12:15 PM
In images or by eyeball?...
Sorry, I just saw your reply. I meant on the images- I couldn't see the spots you were all discussing. The animation did the trick. Ta.

Hope it's something new EvilEye.

slang
2008-Nov-24, 12:16 AM
I'd say the blue object could be real, and something transient that only shows up in one color, namely the filter which was assigned blue in the RGB images - which are probably composed of sloan g*r*i* images.

Well... there's a "duh-why-didn't-I-think-of-that" moment... Good to have some professionals around :)

bunker9603
2008-Nov-24, 02:03 PM
It is interesting to watch the sq372 animation. I see other objects appear and then disappear, most noticeably on the bottom left just to the right of the red star. There a faint white object does a disappearing act.