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View Full Version : favourite warships!(battleships,carriers,subs,etc)



Paul Leeks
2008-Sep-09, 02:06 AM
favourite battleships:Bismarck & Yamamoto
favourite carriers: USS Enterprise (came to NZ in late 60's)
favourite submarine: Typhoon class(soviet)

Eta C
2008-Sep-09, 03:42 AM
Bah.
Iowa class battleships: Superior speed and fire control than either B or Y. Better guns and protection than B. Guns on a par with Y (See Garzke and Duilin's Battleship series for such assessments, or take a gander at this assessment (http://www.combinedfleet.com/baddest.htm).) Actually, you'd probably enjoy the entire Combined Fleet (http://www.combinedfleet.com/kaigun.htm) site. It's goes into a lot of detail on the operational history of the Imperial Japanese Navy.

Spruance class destroyers. OK, I'm biased. I rode two of them for the better part of a year. All decomissioned recently and most already scrapped or sunk as targets. No one ever accused the USN of being sentimental.

Gato & Balao class fleet subs. Did what the U-boats couldn't and brought Japan to the point of starvation. Nice looking too.

Long ago there was a thread on warship history and design. It's probably buried deep in the back of the site. Give a try for the search function. It had some interesting discussions.

Trebuchet
2008-Sep-09, 04:33 AM
I looked for the warship thread a while back and didn't find it. Some old threads were eliminated at the BA/UT merger.

Never rode on a Spruance destroyer, but they did carry equipment I designed as a very young engineer so I guess I'll vote for them too. We used to pass by the David R. Ray frequently near Bremerton, WA, but it was recently sunk as a target. Earlier than that, we used to watch it guarding the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Watched it spend almost all morning one day trying to recover a stuck anchor off Sequim Bay.

I like the Dreadnought era. Lots of experimentation in the early years trying to figure out the best configuration.

slang
2008-Sep-09, 08:08 AM
The USS Nimitz. It can travel through time.

Jens
2008-Sep-09, 08:54 AM
favourite battleships:Bismarck & Yamamoto


I don't like those newfangled contraptions much. I much prefer galleons. To me they are much more beautiful.

Tedward
2008-Sep-09, 09:54 AM
Interesting choice Bismarck & Yamamoto. Both sunk (as were many others) but weapons of the enemy of the time.

HMS Victory for me. Or maybe the first of the big ones, HMS Dreadnought.

G O R T
2008-Sep-09, 11:00 AM
Bah.
Iowa class battleships: Superior speed and fire control than either B or Y. Better guns and protection than B. Guns on a par with Y

Yeah, my best model when I was a kid was BB-63 (USS Missouri).

Of course my second favorite was NCC 1701 :lol:

geonuc
2008-Sep-09, 11:44 AM
If I was to choose a dreadnought, it would be HMS Iron Duke, if only because it was Admiral Jellicoe's flagship. I'm a fan of Jellicoe.

LotusExcelle
2008-Sep-09, 11:58 AM
Are we talking human-history warships or can we delve into sci-fi? Or perhaps split up by era? This is a hard one. On the one hand I am baffled by the grace of the Norse ships ala http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gokstad_ship

Then leap forward to the submarines of the civil war - most notably the Hunley... I can't even fathom what it must have been like to be part of the crew.

Beyond that I'm not sure... hmmm.

geonuc
2008-Sep-09, 12:02 PM
I suppose it would be stretching things to call it my favorite submarine, given that I was miserable my whole time on board, but here's the old sewer pipe I was on:

The USS Sam Houston (SSBN-609)

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3148/2842136321_e8e5b1bc8b.jpg?v=0

Tedward
2008-Sep-09, 12:08 PM
If I was to choose a dreadnought, it would be HMS Iron Duke, if only because it was Admiral Jellicoe's flagship. I'm a fan of Jellicoe.
Could be said to be controversial but either way the other side kept its nose out after that. Must read up more on the chap and event.

geonuc
2008-Sep-09, 12:21 PM
Could be said to be controversial but either way the other side kept its nose out after that. Must read up more on the chap and event.
You're referring to the Battle of Jutland, I suppose? Yeah, that was a bit of a cluster, but the Brits came out ahead and the major tactical errors were Admiral Beatty's. Jellicoe's strategy was to maintain superiority of the Grand Fleet at all costs, thus preventing any invasion of the homeland by sea. In this he was very successful and Germany's fleet never threatened, especially after Jutland.

A good read is Castles of Steel, by Robert K. Massie.

Eta C
2008-Sep-09, 12:58 PM
You're referring to the Battle of Jutland, I suppose? Yeah, that was a bit of a cluster, but the Brits came out ahead and the major tactical errors were Admiral Beatty's. Jellicoe's strategy was to maintain superiority of the Grand Fleet at all costs, thus preventing any invasion of the homeland by sea. In this he was very successful and Germany's fleet never threatened, especially after Jutland.

A good read is Castles of Steel, by Robert K. Massie.

Regarding Jutland I'd also recommend The Rules of the Game by Andrew Gordon. He goes into some of the social and historical reasons for the behaviour and attitudes prevalent in the RN at the time as well as the careers of the various admirals who commanded, in particular Jellicoe, Beatty, and Hugh Evan-Thomas.

As long as we're talking Jutland, how about HMS Agincourt. She holds the record for the most guns and turrets ever carried by a ship: 14 twelve inch in seven twin turrets. It was supposed to be quite a sight when she fired a broadside.

I've been embarked on Nimitz a couple of times. Never did find the time travel equipment.

WHarris
2008-Sep-09, 04:15 PM
favourite battleships:Bismarck & Yamamoto


That's Yamato. Admiral Yamamoto was the CIC of the Imperial Japanese Fleet at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack.

Paul Leeks
2008-Sep-09, 09:48 PM
thanks for my correction about Yamato..huge guns(18")

and thats a good comment about the USS Nimitz travelling through time(Slang)...good movie The Final Countdown.

jj_0001
2008-Sep-09, 10:04 PM
Hmm.

Ship: Iowa Class... No competition. "message for you, sir!" BOOM!

Sub: Improved Los Angeles. My choice for where to be (and in the middle of the Pacific deeps) if stuff breaks out.

Carrier: Not sure. Nimitz class is pretty moby, but I'm more prone to subs.

captain swoop
2008-Sep-09, 10:35 PM
HMS Ashanti (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/tribal_class1.htm)

My first ship, also the Tribals were the first major warship with Gas Turbines (and steam that's why they have 2 funnels.)

And also the Leanders (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/tribal_class1.htm) I was on 3 of them over the years two of these and HMS Diomede (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/tribal_class1.htm) a Broad Beam Leander.

They are in my opinion the best looking warship the RN ever put to sea. ALso the first warship designed with a flight deck and hanger.

geonuc
2008-Sep-09, 10:57 PM
HMS Ashanti (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/tribal_class1.htm)

My first ship, also the Tribals were the first major warship with Gas Turbines (and steam that's why they have 2 funnels.)

And also the Leanders (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/tribal_class1.htm) I was on 3 of them over the years two of these and HMS Diomede (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/tribal_class1.htm) a Broad Beam Leander.

They are in my opinion the best looking warship the RN ever put to sea. ALso the first warship designed with a flight deck and hanger.
I had to look that one up. I served on the USS Duluth for a short time, which was launched in 1965 and featured a flight deck and hangar. But the Leander class beat it by a year or two.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Duluth_(LPD-6)

Trebuchet
2008-Sep-09, 11:46 PM
And as a Patrick O'Brian semi-fan, HMS Surprise.

Chuck
2008-Sep-10, 12:19 AM
I saw a PBS show about The Yamato that said its guns could reach targets beyond the horizon and it needed aircraft to spot targets. It was kept out of combat for most of the war because the aircraft carrier became the dominant weapon and it would have been bad for morale to lose the flagship of the fleet.

jrkeller
2008-Sep-10, 12:54 AM
The Battleship Texas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Texas_(BB-35)). Not because I live in Texas, but because it is one of only two naval ships I've been on. The other being the USS Edson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Edson_(DD-946)).

John Jones
2008-Sep-10, 01:32 AM
thanks for my correction about Yamato..huge guns(18")

and thats a good comment about the USS Nimitz travelling through time(Slang)...good movie The Final Countdown.

It was fiction.

Romanus
2008-Sep-10, 01:33 AM
Battleship: Never been a huge fan of surface warships, but if I had to pick, it would have to be Yamato--not because she was good, but because she was big. ;)

Carrier: U.S.S. Yorktown, as the lead class of the ships that first took the war to Japan.

Submarine: Though I'll be roundly panned, I've liked the Type VII-C for as long as I can remember, in spite of its many limitations even among contemporary subs.

Trebuchet
2008-Sep-10, 04:36 AM
Interesting how we always hear about Yamato, but never her equally huge sister Musashi. Which is also the screen name of a BAUT member.

Battleship Texas is an important artifact, the only remaining battleship of the Dreadnought era as far as I know. More than 90 years old now.

Eta C
2008-Sep-10, 01:12 PM
I saw a PBS show about The Yamato that said its guns could reach targets beyond the horizon and it needed aircraft to spot targets. It was kept out of combat for most of the war because the aircraft carrier became the dominant weapon and it would have been bad for morale to lose the flagship of the fleet.

Battleship guns reaching near, or over the horizon was not limited to Yamato alone. Pretty much any battleship gun worth its steel could do so. A few numbers for the guns courtesy of Combined Fleet (http://www.combinedfleet.com/b_guns.htm)


Yamato Iowa

Size 18.1"/45 cal 16"/50 cal

Projectile 3219 lbs 2700 lbs

Muzzle velocity 2559 ft/sec 2500 ft/sec

Max range 45960 yds (23 n.mi.) 42345 yds (21 n.mi.)

As a side note, the caliber here refers to the length of the barrel in multiples of the bore. So, an 18.1/45 is 814.5" (67.9 feet) long while the 16/50 is 800" (66.67 feet) long, almost the same length. That is why it has almost the same muzzle velocity as the larger gun.

The design of the shell also makes a difference. Most naval historians rate the 16/50 as the best naval gun ever built. Both of these guns could penetrate up to 10" of armor out to about 20 miles despite the difference in bore. To quote Garzke & Dulin (US Battleships 1935-1992)

The new 16-inch/50 caliber gun, Mark 7, given the Iowa and Montana, with a muzzle velocity of 2500 ft/sec, was one of the truly outstanding battleship guns. To all intents and purposes, the 2,700 pound shell from this gun could match the penetration performance of the 3220 pound shell fired by the Japanese 18.1-inch 45 caliber gun.

So, size matters, but it isn't everything. ;)

tbm
2008-Sep-10, 11:54 PM
The British Vanguard can be considered the epitome of British battleship design, and in some ways considered superior to the Iowa class. It was a steady gun platform and had better seakeeping qualities than the Iowas, but was slower and had 15" main guns.

I consider the lowly Casablanca-class CVE as my favorite warship. They performed aircraft ferry, anti-submarine, invasion support, escort, and other duties admirably. They, along with and because of the sacrifice of their escorting DDs and DEs, fought off the attack of, among others, the Yamato in the Battle off Samar, a facet of the Battle of the Leyte Gulf.

tbm

captain swoop
2008-Sep-11, 09:11 PM
Vanguard was a mess. it had second hand 15" guns and wasn't finished until after the war when it was already obsolete. THe KGVs were better ships and the Nelson and Rodney were prob the best British battleships. If the Washington Treaty hadn't come along in the 30s there were plans for ships armed with w quad 16 inch turrets and all up weights of over 80,000 tons.

captain swoop
2008-Sep-11, 09:18 PM
I had to look that one up. I served on the USS Duluth for a short time, which was launched in 1965 and featured a flight deck and hangar. But the Leander class beat it by a year or two.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Duluth_(LPD-6)

Rothesay Class (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/rothesay_class.htm) ships were rebuilt to Leander specs and the Tribals had a small flight deck on the aft deckhouse that was also a lift to strike the Wasp down inside.