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suntrack2
2008-Sep-18, 12:20 PM
The sun will remain more interesting thing for the astro-physicist, the man is trying to get confirmation about lot of efforts from LHC like projects, as far as Sun is concern only we have to assume.

Any spacecraft can visit sun if it match the surface temperature i.e. 6000 degree celcius,so that kind of spacecraft will be needed which can sustain such a temperature, nothing yet found suitable yet which can match on that temperature.

Hope that henode spacecraft can do better in the probe of sun.

Full story:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2008/17sep_polarcrown.htm

mantiss
2008-Sep-18, 02:02 PM
The sun will remain more interesting thing for the astro-physicist, the man is trying to get confirmation about lot of efforts from LHC like projects, as far as Sun is concern only we have to assume.

Any spacecraft can visit sun if it match the surface temperature i.e. 6000 degree celcius,so that kind of spacecraft will be needed which can sustain such a temperature, nothing yet found suitable yet which can match on that temperature.

Hope that henode spacecraft can do better in the probe of sun.

Full story:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2008/17sep_polarcrown.htm

I think the most challenging part of it are the intense radiation, magnetic field and the enormous heat in the corona. The surface temp is only a minor detail when dealing in such an extreme environment.

01101001
2008-Sep-19, 12:09 AM
Henode spacecraft

Hinode (Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinode))

Earlier BAUT Forum topics:

Hinode (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/56035-hinode.html) (ill-fated attempt at discussion by Electric Universe sock puppeteer)
Solar-B spacecraft Launch (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/46704-solar-b-spacecraft-launch.html)

Quickshift
2008-Sep-30, 01:47 PM
I'm kinda in agreement with Mantiss, wouldn't the intense gravity and and the effects of fusion be more distructive than heat?
I've read that a bolt of lightning is hotter than the surface of the sun.
It seems crazy but maybe you could wrap the ship in a lightning bolt.

Quickshift
2008-Sep-30, 01:56 PM
Wow! Just watched the vid from your link!

slang
2008-Sep-30, 09:59 PM
It seems crazy but maybe you could wrap the ship in a lightning bolt.

To protect a spaceship from something hot, you make it hotter? Yeah, that does sound crazy. :)

Hornblower
2008-Oct-01, 02:09 AM
I'm kinda in agreement with Mantiss, wouldn't the intense gravity and and the effects of fusion be more distructive than heat?
I've read that a bolt of lightning is hotter than the surface of the sun.
It seems crazy but maybe you could wrap the ship in a lightning bolt. What effects of fusion? Please elaborate.

In free fall, gravity will not be destructive.

RegisteredUsername
2008-Oct-02, 11:06 AM
It would, though rarely, Spaghettification =)

Lightning bolt might be hotter than the sun, but it is of a very small area.

Imagine being scalded by a cigarette lighter, and being engulfed by a forest fire. You get the difference =0

Quickshift
2008-Oct-02, 03:14 PM
What effects of fusion? Please elaborate.

In free fall, gravity will not be destructive.

My apologies I should have said radiation. If there are any other effects of fusion I haven't a clue. I do wonder about the the magnetic fields how they would affect a probe. I wonder if it would be possible to use the field itself as a function of the ship.

Quickshift
2008-Oct-02, 03:21 PM
The sun will remain more interesting thing for the astro-physicist, the man is trying to get confirmation about lot of efforts from LHC like projects, as far as Sun is concern only we have to assume.

Any spacecraft can visit sun if it match the surface temperature i.e. 6000 degree celcius,so that kind of spacecraft will be needed which can sustain such a temperature, nothing yet found suitable yet which can match on that temperature.

Hope that henode spacecraft can do better in the probe of sun.

Full story:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2008/17sep_polarcrown.htm

I should of posed this question first. How would matching the surface temperature of the sun enable a spcecraft to visit the surface?
Do you mean to resist the 6000 C temp?

Hornblower
2008-Oct-02, 07:35 PM
My apologies I should have said radiation. If there are any other effects of fusion I haven't a clue. I do wonder about the the magnetic fields how they would affect a probe. I wonder if it would be possible to use the field itself as a function of the ship.
What do you mean by "use the field itself as a function of the ship"?

Quickshift
2008-Oct-03, 01:16 PM
What do you mean by "use the field itself as a function of the ship"?

Maybe to generate the power required to shield the ship this is purely hypothical.

Hornblower
2008-Oct-03, 02:56 PM
Maybe to generate the power required to shield the ship this is purely hypothical.

1. Shield the ship from what?

2. How is a magnetic field, or some electrodynamic function generated by it, supposed to accomplish the shielding?

Quickshift
2008-Oct-03, 03:21 PM
1. Shield the ship from what?

2. How is a magnetic field, or some electrodynamic function generated by it, supposed to accomplish the shielding?

Read the op

Hornblower
2008-Oct-03, 11:35 PM
Read the op

The OP is contemplating a Sun-grazing spacecraft that would need to withstand having its exterior heated to some 6,000o. How do propose using electrodynamic action generated by the craft's passage through the magnetic field to cool it?

cjameshuff
2008-Oct-04, 06:13 PM
The OP is contemplating a Sun-grazing spacecraft that would need to withstand having its exterior heated to some 6,000o. How do propose using electrodynamic action generated by the craft's passage through the magnetic field to cool it?

One somewhat-plausible possibility...build up a magnetosphere filled with plasma with the appropriately chosen absorption/emission characteristics to absorb as much external radiation as possible. It will be re-radiated, of course, but much of that will be in directions away from the probe. It wouldn't change the fact that the spacecraft would eventually reach equilibrium as a cloud of plasma, but it might slow down the radiative and conductive heating of the spacecraft. It would also blind the spacecraft in those spectra, though...

A strong magnetic field could divert charged particle radiation, again reducing the rate of heating, and more importantly, keeping the electronics functioning. Wouldn't do anything for neutron radiation, though, which might be significant...

Electrodynamic effects might be useful for getting the probe away from the sun. Not cooling it or reducing the rate of heating...just getting it up to an altitude where it can transmit data before it fries.

Hornblower
2008-Oct-04, 07:05 PM
One somewhat-plausible possibility...build up a magnetosphere filled with plasma with the appropriately chosen absorption/emission characteristics to absorb as much external radiation as possible. It will be re-radiated, of course, but much of that will be in directions away from the probe. It wouldn't change the fact that the spacecraft would eventually reach equilibrium as a cloud of plasma, but it might slow down the radiative and conductive heating of the spacecraft. It would also blind the spacecraft in those spectra, though...

A strong magnetic field could divert charged particle radiation, again reducing the rate of heating, and more importantly, keeping the electronics functioning. Wouldn't do anything for neutron radiation, though, which might be significant...

Electrodynamic effects might be useful for getting the probe away from the sun. Not cooling it or reducing the rate of heating...just getting it up to an altitude where it can transmit data before it fries.The bulk of the heating would be from infrared and visible light, which is not deflected by a magnetosphere. A glossy white skin would lower the equilibrium temperature somewhat.

Perhaps some sort of ablative heat shield material could be used to carry away heat by evaporation during a close fly-by.

I would not expect any neutron bombardment outside of the core. The neutrons would be absorbed deep inside the Sun, and would turn into hydrogen. Free neutrons decay with a half life of about 15 minutes.

cjameshuff
2008-Oct-04, 07:28 PM
The bulk of the heating would be from infrared and visible light, which is not deflected by a magnetosphere.

My suggestion was to fill the magnetosphere with plasma with its absorption/emission spectrum chosen to absorb as much as possible of the incident light. Magnetic fields themselves have no effect on light, but they can contain plasma that does.



Perhaps some sort of ablative heat shield material could be used to carry away heat by evaporation during a close fly-by.

I think evaporative cooling of some sort would be necessary no matter what.



I would not expect any neutron bombardment outside of the core. The neutrons would be absorbed deep inside the Sun, and would turn into hydrogen. Free neutrons decay with a half life of about 15 minutes.

Which is why there's not much solar neutron radiation at Earth...just a handful of neutrons that are moving fast enough to get here before they decay. However, neutron radiation can be made by processes other than the fusion occurring in the sun's core, so there may be enough to matter when you're skirting through the surface layers.