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jogleby
2008-Oct-01, 06:38 PM
Hi, I'm new to the forums, but consider myself a fairly big astronomy and physics fan. I've got a question that's been bothering me. I've done some searches but couldn't find any information anywhere.

My question is whether or not particles are embedded in spacetime. If they are, and they displace the spacetime around them, could this be what gives particles mass, and the distortions of spacetime is what gravity arises from?

I'm sure I've got some basic physics wrong, but any insight would be appreciated.

antoniseb
2008-Oct-01, 06:44 PM
My question is whether or not particles are embedded in spacetime. If they are, and they displace the spacetime around them, could this be what gives particles mass, and the distortions of spacetime is what gravity arises from?

Welcome to BAUT.

You are asking questions that are essentially about the nature of space, time, and particles. These questions will make more sense after we have demonstrated (or disproved) String theory, LQG, or anything else that says something really concrete about space, time, and particles.

trinitree88
2008-Oct-01, 06:57 PM
Hi, I'm new to the forums, but consider myself a fairly big astronomy and physics fan. I've got a question that's been bothering me. I've done some searches but couldn't find any information anywhere.

My question is whether or not particles are embedded in spacetime. If they are, and they displace the spacetime around them, could this be what gives particles mass, and the distortions of spacetime is what gravity arises from?

I'm sure I've got some basic physics wrong, but any insight would be appreciated.

jogleby. Welcome to the Bautforum. Spacetime passes through the particles, too. Most of the Standard Model pictures baryons, mesons, as composites of quarks and colored gluons. The gradeschool picture of protons, or neutrons, as little hard balls is fairly incomplete. High energy physics labs showed that the scattering of energetic electrons off of proton-rich targets suggested that they contained a composite structure. The best fit to the data indicates ~ 3 quarks for ptotons and neutrons...two for mesons. In this model, they do not "expel" or push out spacetime around them.
In classical GR, the presence of mass changes the 3-D geometry of the local spacetime...say a neutron/anti-neutron pair was just promoted into existence. However, the idea that the spacetime was empty...even if a low vacuum, to begin with, is itself fundamentally flawed. No experiment has ever been conducted using such an animal. pete

cosmocrazy
2008-Oct-01, 08:39 PM
Hi, I'm new to the forums, but consider myself a fairly big astronomy and physics fan. I've got a question that's been bothering me. I've done some searches but couldn't find any information anywhere.

My question is whether or not particles are embedded in spacetime. If they are, and they displace the spacetime around them, could this be what gives particles mass, and the distortions of spacetime is what gravity arises from?

I'm sure I've got some basic physics wrong, but any insight would be appreciated.

Hi, and welcome to the forum!! :)

The question you pose cannot at present be answered directly or with any certainty. As antoniseb has mentioned we need to find more evidence about just what spacetime is and how it interacts with mass and energy at the quantum level. The implication of particles (assuming you mean mass particles) being embedded in space-time suggests that space-time has a physical property to its structure that we maybe be able to detect. Maybe it has but we are yet unable to detect it. Who knows?

What you will learn from some of the more knowledgeable folks on BAUT is that there are a number of different theories regarding this but non have any validity that can be tested and proven. :)

jogleby
2008-Oct-01, 09:08 PM
Yes, when I was referring to particles, I meant ones that had mass, specifically quarks. I have an hour commute home from work and have listening to a lot of science podcasts and it got me thinking (which can be a dangerous thing! lol). If energy and mass are the same thing, and mass is created when there is a lot of energy at a single point, could that mass be created by the quantas of energy pushing spacetime out of the way, like a needle displacing the threads of a sheet as you push it though. Of course, one thing lead to another and before long, I had a "theory of everything" and though I should ask if my basic premise was right or wrong before I made an *** out of myself.

Are the any tests that have been done or that are on the horizon that try to explore the physical properties of space-time, if it even has any?

Ken G
2008-Oct-02, 01:03 AM
Are the any tests that have been done or that are on the horizon that try to explore the physical properties of space-time, if it even has any?
The biggie right now is the search for the Higgs boson by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The "Higgs mechanism" is thought to be the source of mass, and I believe it has more to do with interactions with the Higgs field than with spacetime, but heck, what's the difference-- it is probably not necessary to take either the Higgs field or spacetime too seriously-- the are just primitive elements of more complete theories like the standard model of particle physics and relativity, respectively.