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View Full Version : Dense Exoplanet Creates Classification Calamity



Fraser
2008-Oct-06, 06:50 PM
Last May, the COROT satellite discovered another exoplanet to add to the stack of 228 confirmed exoplanets. Follow-up investigations of the object, named Corot-exo-3b, have revealed it to be quite a curiosity as far as exoplanets are concerned, and some of its characteristics such as its density of twice that of lead may [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/10/06/dense-exoplanet-creates-classification-calamity/)

JESMKS
2008-Oct-06, 07:39 PM
This story leads me to wonder how they established the location of the equater on the host star.

antoniseb
2008-Oct-06, 07:52 PM
This story leads me to wonder how they established the location of the equater on the host star.

The story implied that the star has a dust-disk, and that this planet's orbit is tilted 70 degrees to the disk. They presume this disk is in the plane of the equator.

JonClarke
2008-Oct-06, 09:39 PM
Interesting discovery. So much for the COROT critics.

timb
2008-Oct-07, 01:50 AM
Sounds like a beat-up. A 21.6MJ object is a brown dwarf (http://www.dtm.ciw.edu/boss/definition.html). Yes, they get very dense. Jupiter's is close to the maximum diameter of a ball of cold solar-metallicity material. A 60MJ brown dwarf has a slightly smaller diameter than Jupiter.

Abbadon_2008
2008-Oct-07, 02:16 AM
Sounds like a brown dwarf to me, too.

timb
2008-Oct-08, 11:12 AM
Brown dwarfs are another classification anomaly. Are they planets or stars? at the moment the official unofficial position seems to be that they are neither. Some of the exoplanet people seem to have a different idea as to where the boundary between planet and bd lies. For example exoplanet.eu lists 14 objects (including the one referred to in the OP) which should be classed as bds according to the IAU draft guideline.