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View Full Version : You Hot Pepper Fans Ought To Like This.



BigDon
2008-Oct-22, 01:58 AM
A friend of mine was going though his late father's effects a while back and found his dad had put up some seeds from a Columbian pepper believed to be one of the core peppers originally domesticated.

This pepper has three races and we had the rarer one. Rocotillo? I think that's the name. I'll have to double check.

They looked and tasted like small red bell peppers with the capsaicin levels set for "Not Funny". All the plants we had died during a cold wave 20 years ago and we thought them lost. (for two weeks it didn't get above 32F) Plus my mother really like how they pickled and held their texture.

He now has several germinated and sprouted. I'll keep you posted

Neverfly
2008-Oct-22, 02:19 AM
Irony... that bit about the cold wiping them out...

BigDon
2008-Oct-22, 03:37 AM
We didn't hold much hope the seeds would be viable after twenty years. They had all turned from black to brown.

That was back in my greenhouse days and when I brought some of these badboys in to work we ate some during luch and the effects were noteworthy.

One effect was the sleeper hit. The first piece, even thoroughly chewed, often had a minimal burn. Nobody knows why. The next would take the top of your head off.

One of the guys working there was an redhaired and freckled Irish kid named Shawn (sic). He was a hot pepper fan as well. We told each other which lunch places had the good burritos as we came from different parts of the peninsula. He was the definiton of "scrappy". It was really easy for him to get into a fight.

He got a sleeper hit. Told me he was disappointed. I gave him another piece. His best friend and drinking buddy Humberto started howling with laughter because Shawn's face turned bright red expect for the end of his nose, which turned bright white. Quite amazing.

Happened to Humberto too. It's just the contrast wasn't so sharp.

This stuff induced all the syptoms of a major capsaicin hit, including temporary deafness, (according to the Latinos it's so you can't hear yourself scream) changes in facial color and of course, a picante tang.

This is going to rock when these thing mature.

mfumbesi
2008-Oct-22, 10:33 AM
Wow, that description of the phases of being "burned" are fascinating.
Do you have any brown (or even blackish) friends?
I would be interested in finding out what colour changes their faces go through.

LotusExcelle
2008-Oct-22, 10:46 AM
I've had two hot peppers that made me wish i was dead. Can't remember what kind they were but they were small and the green was hotter than the red. Anyway. We three friends were young and foolish. One day Andre came over with a bag of peppers (yes - rather than a bag of other stuff... my friends brought peppers). We all stood in the driveway and at the same time bit down on the peppers.

3 seconds later I was inside with my head under the sink. Brian was cramming his head in the freezer and eating ice. Andre was trying in vain to cram an entire loaf of bread in his mouth while at the same time drinking milk straight from the carton.

Jay200MPH
2008-Oct-22, 10:52 AM
Haha, awesome. Sounds like the "evil peppers" (so called by my Javanese colleague who wouldn't touch them) I brought back from Indonesia. So tasty and so much fun to inflict on unsuspecting friends. They're just tiny little things about the size of the end of your thumb. Nobody suspects they're silent killers.

My taste receptors aren't very good so "subtle" food is completely beyond me. The louder the better.

- J

geonuc
2008-Oct-22, 11:09 AM
Don - post a photo of a mature chile, when the time comes. Your description of 'small red bell peppers' calls to mind the habanero, maybe the related scotch bonnet. Both are quite hot, although the heat level varies considerably, depending on variety.

Although I'm sure the chiles are hot, there's a good chance you can purchase hotter ones at the grocery store. It's very likely I grow much hotter ones in my garden - the Red Savina habanero (see my recent photo post in the the foodie thread, if you've a mind). Breeding efforts have advanced the Scoville level of chiles significantly, so this 'core pepper' is probably behind the times, genetically speaking.

But still a worthy plant. I'd grow the seeds if I had some. I'd really love to get ahold of a noka jolokia plant, currently the leader of the pack, heatwise.

I admit it. I have a hot chile addiction. :sad:

Whirlpool
2008-Oct-22, 11:37 AM
I am a Fan of Hot Peppers. Whatever kind of peppers it is , small or big , red or green. But I don't eat it alone , usually Asian Dishes has them , it gives "spice" to the food that makes you want to eat more . :p

LotusExcelle
2008-Oct-22, 11:42 AM
Heat is good but around here people seem to think heat is flavor. You could have the hottest thing on the planet but if it doesn't taste good - what is the point? I used to work at Xerox - and every few months we'd have a kind of lab party thing. Basically everyone would bring a dish to pass etc etc. This one tech made the hottest dirty rice I've ever had but it tasted so good you couldn't stop eating it. I don't think he ever revealed what pepper(s) he put in... but ever since then I've had a penchant for heat with flavor.

As an example my fiancée and I frequent a local Indian restaurant. (rated best in the city for this year but we've been going there since we met)

I order xacutti always - and always tell them to make it really, really hot. It is. It makes my face turn bright red. but the FLAVOR is so amazing I don't care if my mouth is being welded together. Okay now I'm drooling.

Whirlpool
2008-Oct-22, 11:54 AM
Yep , Heat adds Flavor to the food .

:p

mahesh
2008-Oct-22, 12:15 PM
...This is going to rock when these thing mature.
Curious to know the details, like Lotus...salivatin' at the thought...

There was an 'event' here, recently, B D, involving a chef! He was enthusiastic to 'taste' this chilli he was shown. well, he ate it. fine. but later that same evening, he became an ex-chef....a la Monty Python. i'll see if i find that reportage. wasn't even thirty...i don't think..

on a personal note: i have always thought, that my family's penchant for chillies is acute.
in that, that one specific degree of intensity is applicable to them, the remaining 359 may apply to the rest of the universe.
i keep away from that stuff, though. hot 'daze' are over for me.

Neverfly
2008-Oct-22, 12:25 PM
I don't eat food that's loaded with capsiacin.

That's why the plant put it there. To stave off being eaten.


If I was meant to shoot fire, I'd be a dragon. (And surely the flames would be designed to shoot out the proper end...)

LotusExcelle
2008-Oct-22, 12:37 PM
I have a comical story involving capsaicin. It is not safe for the forum though... but use your imagination. Just... kids... wash it off your hands thoroughly.

Swift
2008-Oct-22, 01:20 PM
They looked and tasted like small red bell peppers with the capsaicin levels set for "Not Funny".
Yes, but that description is definitely funny. :lol:


Heat is good but around here people seem to think heat is flavor. You could have the hottest thing on the planet but if it doesn't taste good - what is the point?
I'm with you. I like heat, but hot without good taste... well, not for me. That's why I'm not a big fan of jalapeños; to me they are just hot. On the flip side, I love chipoltes, love that smokey flavor. The canned ones in adobo sauce are wonderful.


I have a comical story involving capsaicin. It is not safe for the forum though... but use your imagination. Just... kids... wash it off your hands thoroughly.
Before you touch your eyes.... yeah that's it. Actually, I've done that, luckily with something only mildly hot on my hands. Still, not very fun.

mahesh
2008-Oct-22, 01:36 PM
i reckon Bhutanese chillies are the bees' knees....
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4315155.stm

chillies / hot cakes and all that...
i wouldn't mind trying some, myself. yikes.

edit: pretty lady, nice name...Thimpul, irresistible cooking.

Whirlpool
2008-Oct-22, 02:17 PM
I like pepper but NOT Curry Powder or food cooked with it .

http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons7/33.gif

LotusExcelle
2008-Oct-22, 02:24 PM
wow you must not like Red Dwarf then.

Whirlpool
2008-Oct-22, 02:31 PM
Umm..Please excuse my Naiveness but ......Who or What is Red Dwarf?


:confused:

Neverfly
2008-Oct-22, 02:35 PM
Umm..Please excuse my Naiveness but ......Who or What is Red Dwarf?


:confused:

The eighth dwarf.

Pre-production for "Snow White" he was admitted into rehab and his part subsequently removed from the script rather than search for a replacement on short notice.

Swift
2008-Oct-22, 02:41 PM
Umm..Please excuse my Naiveness but ......Who or What is Red Dwarf?


:confused:
It was a funny British TV science fiction program. One of the characters on there was extremely fond of curries.

Neverfly, come here, I got a special hot pepper sauce on the stove I want you to try. Open wide....

Whirlpool
2008-Oct-22, 02:49 PM
Oh.. Thanks Swift .

I think Neverfly will turn RED on that Hot Pepper Sauce.

:p

weatherc
2008-Oct-22, 02:50 PM
I like pepper but NOT Curry Powder or food cooked with it .

http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons7/33.gifYay! That means there's more for me!

Whirlpool
2008-Oct-22, 02:53 PM
:neutral:

Sure , it's ALL yours.

Neverfly
2008-Oct-22, 02:54 PM
Neverfly, come here, I got a special hot pepper sauce on the stove I want you to try. Open wide....

"Have you noticed the river of lava..."


http://www.modernhometheater.com/gifs/movies/iceagemeltdown/ice.gif

BigDon
2008-Oct-23, 01:51 AM
Don - post a photo of a mature chile, when the time comes. Your description of 'small red bell peppers' calls to mind the habanero, maybe the related scotch bonnet. Both are quite hot, although the heat level varies considerably, depending on variety.

Although I'm sure the chiles are hot, there's a good chance you can purchase hotter ones at the grocery store. It's very likely I grow much hotter ones in my garden - the Red Savina habanero (see my recent photo post in the the foodie thread, if you've a mind). Breeding efforts have advanced the Scoville level of chiles significantly, so this 'core pepper' is probably behind the times, genetically speaking.

But still a worthy plant. I'd grow the seeds if I had some. I'd really love to get ahold of a noka jolokia plant, currently the leader of the pack, heatwise.

I admit it. I have a hot chile addiction. :sad:


Ah, but think about it logically Geo. Why would you eat something hot unless it tasted good? These have high heat and a marvelous flavor. I have eaten and finished napalm hot Thai dishs but going for just nulcear heat is sort of not my thing. I really like a flavor of these guys.

My friend and I found the web site for these things. This very species has been found in 5000 year old archeological sites. Rocotos is what they are.

http://www.rocoto.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=106

When we get up and running next growing season I'll send you some seeds, how mild are your winters?

BigDon
2008-Oct-23, 01:53 AM
Wow, that description of the phases of being "burned" are fascinating.
Do you have any brown (or even blackish) friends?
I would be interested in finding out what colour changes their faces go through.

Why yes I do, some being regular dinner guests. And since they know me so well they know better than to put things in their months that make ME jump and dance.

geonuc
2008-Oct-23, 11:09 AM
Ah, but think about it logically Geo. Why would you eat something hot unless it tasted good? These have high heat and a marvelous flavor. I have eaten and finished hot Thai dishs but going for just nulcear heat is sort of not my thing. I really like a flavor of these guys.
I agree wholeheatedly, BD. Although I like spiciness - much more spicy than most - flavor is important. I grow lots of chiles, not just the ultrahot habaneros, which tend to be used in chili and not much else due to their lethality.

I've had this discussion on food forums and those who don't like picante food or have a low tolerance for it often accuse me of burning my mouth out in a show of bravado, or some such. I don't look at it that way. I really do have a high tolerance for capsaicin, which means it takes more to induce a pleasant burning sensation that it does with most others. I'm not a masochist.

Habaneros, by the way, do have a nice flavor not found in serranos, for example. You just have to be careful how much of the chile you use and take precautions in handling them.

LotusExcelle
2008-Oct-23, 11:15 AM
What of the the merciless peppers of Quetzlzacatenango… grown deep in the jungle primeval by the inmates of a Guatemalan insane asylum. And it makes you see Johnny Cash in animal form. (I'd eat one just to meet Mr. Cash)

That also was one of my favorite episodes (Simpsons, for those that don't catch the reference)

geonuc
2008-Oct-23, 11:17 AM
My friend and I found the web site for these things. This very species has been found in 5000 year old archeological sites. Rocotos is what they are.

http://www.rocoto.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=106

When we get up and running next growing season I'll send you some seeds, how mild are your winters?
Atlanta winters are usually not too bad, but I've found getting chile plants to survive the cold is more trouble than it's worth. So I grow new ones each year. And I am a lousy gardener, so growing from seed is not my norm.

My usual source is Cross Country nurseries. They have the red rocoto, so I'll get a couple plants next year:

http://www.chileplants.com/search.asp?CategoryID=1&HeatID=&TypeID=&UseID=&Color=&FleshID=&LengthID=&WidthID=&OrientationID=&FoliageID=&HeightID=&SeasonID=&Location=&SpeciesCode=&StockStatusID=&Keyword=rocoto&Search=True&SearchMode=simple&SearchButton=Go

Jay200MPH
2008-Oct-23, 02:49 PM
I don't eat food that's loaded with capsiacin.

That's why the plant put it there. To stave off being eaten.


If I was meant to shoot fire, I'd be a dragon. (And surely the flames would be designed to shoot out the proper end...)

So wait, you only eat things that want to be eaten? Where's the sport in that?

- J

Neverfly
2008-Oct-23, 10:21 PM
So wait, you only eat things that want to be eaten? Where's the sport in that?

- J

Tusks, horns, sharp hooves I can handle.
Chemical Attacks means No Touchie.

That's why we have NBC gear in the army but not Bullet proof BDU's.

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2008-Oct-25, 07:00 AM
Tusks, horns, sharp hooves I can handle.
Chemical Attacks means No Touchie.

That's why we have NBC gear in the army but not Bullet proof BDU's.

The chemicals that give herbs, spices, and some fruits and vegetables their flavors are defenses against something, be it animals or microbes. But dilution and cooking make them delicious rather than noxious.

I'm afraid I would find dinner at your place rather dull, and you would probably think my dinner was completely inedible.

Neverfly
2008-Oct-25, 12:36 PM
I'm afraid I would find dinner at your place rather dull, and you would probably think my dinner was completely inedible.

You could be right, but I doubt you'd find mine dull.
Bland perhaps...
But not dull. Not unless you stab what's on your plate too quickly and it stops moving before the fun begins.
But most people don't catch it in time.

slang
2008-Oct-25, 09:24 PM
So wait, you only eat things that want to be eaten? Where's the sport in that?


"Or the rump is very good," murmured the animal. "I've been exercising it and eating plenty of grain, so there's a lot of good meat there." It gave a mellow grunt, gurgled again and started to chew the cud. It swallowed the cud again.
"Or a casserole of me perhaps?" it added.
[...]
"What's the problem Earthman?" said Zaphod, now transferring his attention to the animal's enormous rump.
"I just don't want to eat an animal that's standing here inviting me to," said Arthur, "it's heartless."
"Better than eating an animal that doesn't want to be eaten," said Zaphod.


Anyway, all funny quoting aside, how difficult is it to grow your own hot peppers, keeping in mind that I live in a climate much like the UK? My gardening skills are limited to occasionally cutting the grass successfully, and I managed to grow a few small pumpkins. Trying to get some real peppers out of the ground seems a lot more fun than trying my hand at strawberries again.. :) Are there any resources on the web that might help out assessing if it's something that I might try?

korjik
2008-Oct-26, 06:42 AM
I grew up in Wisconsin, where cheese is a spice. It took the better part of 20 years to get me to where I can eat wimpy jalapenos. That kinda rots, cause I like peppers, but have no capsazin resistance.

EricM407
2008-Oct-26, 11:37 AM
I grew up in Wisconsin, where cheese is a spice. It took the better part of 20 years to get me to where I can eat wimpy jalapenos. That kinda rots, cause I like peppers, but have no capsazin resistance.

I don't think it matters what your absolute capsaicin tolerance is so much, just that you push up against whatever yours is to get the heat effect. If you prefer the flavor of something that's hotter than a jalapeno (I do), then you can always increase the food-pepper ratio when you cook and still keep the heat tolerable.

geonuc
2008-Oct-26, 11:58 AM
I don't think it matters what your absolute capsaicin tolerance is so much, just that you push up against whatever yours is to get the heat effect. If you prefer the flavor of something that's hotter than a jalapeno (I do), then you can always increase the food-pepper ratio when you cook and still keep the heat tolerable.
I agree. Serrano chiles, for example, have a different flavor that you might like, if used more moderately. Even habaneros are an option if your tolerance is not too low and you use them very moderately and very carefully (for those with too low of a tolerance, I wouldn't recommend habs as you won't be able to use enough to get the flavor before running into the heat barrier).
.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Oct-26, 04:04 PM
Anyway, all funny quoting aside, how difficult is it to grow your own hot peppers, keeping in mind that I live in a climate much like the UK? My gardening skills are limited to occasionally cutting the grass successfully, and I managed to grow a few small pumpkins. Trying to get some real peppers out of the ground seems a lot more fun than trying my hand at strawberries again.. :) Are there any resources on the web that might help out assessing if it's something that I might try?
I'm in Denmark, our climate resemble the stereotypical English weather, and have had no trouble growing hot peppers in a greenhouse in the summer.

Getting them to survive winter hasn't been possible as I don't live in the garden during winter so there's nothing heated, so for me they're annual and has to be started again each year.

Strawberries are easy, they spread like weeds here and I have a variety that has strawberries twice during the season, both early summer and late autumn, it's a nice and interesting way to start the day to pick a couple of fresh strawberries on the way to work on a clear October morning.

I'm seriously considering planting strawberries for ground cover next season.

geonuc
2008-Oct-26, 05:20 PM
Are there any resources on the web that might help out assessing if it's something that I might try?
These two sites might be useful:

http://www.fiery-foods.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=23&Itemid=147

http://www.chileplants.com/growhow.asp

BigDon
2008-Oct-26, 06:36 PM
I agree. Serrano chiles, for example, have a different flavor that you might like, if used more moderately. Even habaneros are an option if your tolerance is not too low and you use them very moderately and very carefully (for those with too low of a tolerance, I wouldn't recommend habs as you won't be able to use enough to get the flavor before running into the heat barrier).
.


Sliced serranos sauted with sliced mushrooms was the condiment my mother used to top a ragout she made regularly. When I was eleven my mother let me put in on mine and I was hooked. Jalapenos weren't as popular and common as now, in general.

slang
2008-Oct-26, 10:51 PM
Thanks guys. Seems a greenhouse is definitely needed, which isn't an option for me now. Something for later on in life I suppose. Geonuc, those links are interesting indeed, thanks!