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apolloman
2008-Oct-22, 11:43 AM
Hi, I'm planning on going to see one of the shuttle launches next year before the fleet is retired.

Having 7-10 days available, I wanted some suggestions as to what to see - I will be checking on the Nasa website but wondered if you guys had any recommendations.

Budget is not a problem.

Thanks !

apolloman
2008-Oct-23, 09:29 AM
Come on guys ... no itinery ideas ? Things worthwhile seeing ?
I was looking forward to a few replies....

Neverfly
2008-Oct-23, 09:37 AM
Kinda boring down here huh?

apolloman
2008-Oct-23, 10:12 AM
apparently so...:(

I thought this would have been a great place to get ideas from; surely there are people here who have been to KSC and could suggest places to see etc.

but apparently not. :cry:

novaderrik
2008-Oct-23, 10:19 AM
shuttle launches are regularly put off for days, weeks, months- or even years.. so it's kind of hard to schedule a visit when one actually goes up.

Neverfly
2008-Oct-23, 10:26 AM
shuttle launches are regularly put off for days, weeks, months- or even years.. so it's kind of hard to schedule a visit when one actually goes up.

Well, he DID say that budget is not a problem;)

geonuc
2008-Oct-23, 10:55 AM
My wife wants to see a shuttle launch too, but I remind her what novaderrik indicated: they almost never take off on time, it seems.

I've not been to the KSC area, so no suggestions.

apolloman
2008-Oct-23, 12:24 PM
yeah i know the shuttle launch schedules aren't simple and I still have to figure that part out. I'll probably arrange it around a business trip to the states next year ... but I wasn't asking that. :)
Rather some suggestions of places to see in KSC area related to space exploration, especially Apollo related gear etc.
Appreciate any ideas !

Budget is not a problem cos' the place where I work covers all costs on such trips - even if we throw in a weeks' holiday ! Lucky for some !! :lol:

schlaugh
2008-Oct-23, 07:24 PM
By and large the only space-related tourism at KSC is KSC.

Visiting Kennedy (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/visit/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=1&usg=AFQjCNFeLsc245HzYqGz-uHhXTZ0pQ7zmA)
Shuttle Launch Schedule (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=2&usg=AFQjCNGKh2vZrMTIMUEJZJMdA2J2cjTNQg)
View a Shuttle Launch (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/view/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=3&usg=AFQjCNFafMz7D79aaWSNLt03RRgWK7Xj_A)
Next Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=4&usg=AFQjCNEdyerH9sLuhJ32G4lVN2ZoNA4s8Q)
Orlando (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/visit/orlmap.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=5&usg=AFQjCNFPqLqnjpcDWzfI6MNfC3p90-39jQ)
Contact Kennedy (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/information/information-index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=6&usg=AFQjCNGUQe5Ih4zilQJMlFvfefK8xU1KtQ)
Events (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/events/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=7&usg=AFQjCNGqn1kcwMPBq3snkuEeM2F3oJV3Lg)
About Kennedy (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=8&usg=AFQjCNFpB58ZiGoKbMSfiEBT_AC6AJdTpg)

Pretty much all you need to know is in those links. If you don;t want to spend the money, then viewing a shuttle depends on how much time (and energy) that you want to devote to the effort in finding a parking spot near the Cape. The earlier you leave your hotel, house, etc., then the closer you can get to KSC.

Private vehicles are not allowed on KSC grounds during launches so any viewing on KSC property is handled by a private contractor. Please see the lnks for details, planning and costs.

That said, if you just want to get relatively close, you can park on the coast anywhere north or south of the cape and watch from the comfort of your beach chair. I saw Columbia's first launch from Melbourne in 1981 and it was pretty spectacular even that far away.

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-24, 02:12 AM
I'd like to go to KSC sometime before 2010, too. Maybe this summer as my "Kai Survived School Yet Again" gift.

megrfl
2008-Oct-24, 02:36 AM
yeah i know the shuttle launch schedules aren't simple and I still have to figure that part out. I'll probably arrange it around a business trip to the states next year ... but I wasn't asking that. :)
Rather some suggestions of places to see in KSC area related to space exploration, especially Apollo related gear etc.
Appreciate any ideas !

Budget is not a problem cos' the place where I work covers all costs on such trips - even if we throw in a weeks' holiday ! Lucky for some !! :lol:

Sorry, I am now just seeing your thread. Disney World is only about 40 mins to an hour west of the Kennedy Space Center. You could actually stay at Disney and then just shoot over to see the shuttle launch. Disney probably has a shuttle, or I'm sure there is one available in Orlando that could take you over to KSC.

Disney includes the Epcot Center, Magic Kingdom, Animal Kingdom, MGM studios, and a couple of great water parks. In addition Disney has some of the most beautiful resorts.
If you are planning on staying just a week you will not be able to see it all.

If, however, you have stayed at Disney World and have no desire to return; then my best suggestion would be to go to St. Augustine and visit the beach, shops and etc.

Kennedy Space Center is only good for about a day, if that.

apolloman
2008-Oct-24, 09:32 AM
SCHlaugh : thanks ! i'll check out these links. :)

Megrfl : thanks for the info ! I'm not a Disney type although it might be a possibility to keep in mind.

So there are no aerospace museums or other such stuff around KSC ? wow, I thought it would be have been full of them.

Where would be the best place (in the US) to go to see space flight history & modern gear, i.e. Apollo rockets, LM modules, Shuttles, Planetariums, Training centers etc... you know the EXCITING stuff ? Maybe I could see the launch and then go somewhere else.
Like I said, cost isn't a worry.

I really appreciate this. :lol:

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-24, 12:22 PM
...wow, I thought it would be have been full of them...
Personally; I like it that way. All in one place not having to make the decision "Should I see this?... What's there?... I wonder if this looks like the other x...". Stuff like that. Plus; I think it's a respectable enough destination that a "themed" surrounding would probably just cheapen the effect for me.

Funny thing though; some many years ago, an AF cousin of mine was there and gave me (while the rest of the group I was with saw the public portion) an entire tour of the Cape. This included some areas where I was sternly informed to "stow" the camera. We were in blockhouses, launchpads and all sorts of places. Incredible...

Anyway; members of the group (we were actually visiting Disney) asked about beaches and what Cocoa Beach was like. He replied "never been there"... Even after a few years of service there. :eh:
I never did learn what Cocoa Beach was like.

megrfl
2008-Oct-24, 12:33 PM
SCHlaugh : thanks ! i'll check out these links. :)

Megrfl : thanks for the info ! I'm not a Disney type although it might be a possibility to keep in mind.

So there are no aerospace museums or other such stuff around KSC ? wow, I thought it would be have been full of them.

Where would be the best place (in the US) to go to see space flight history & modern gear, i.e. Apollo rockets, LM modules, Shuttles, Planetariums, Training centers etc... you know the EXCITING stuff ? Maybe I could see the launch and then go somewhere else.
Like I said, cost isn't a worry.

I really appreciate this. :lol:

Epcot at Disney is full of science related exhibitions and "rides". Mission to mars is pretty awesome, wish I could explain the "ride". Maybe some here could, I know it has to do with spinning Gs and then looking at a screen showing you moving forward. Weird, but it works. Anyway, most of Disney has science based themes, sort of. Not so much the Magic Kingdom; unless you count Space Mountain a roller coaster, and Buzz Light Year an interactive ride.
The Animal Kingdom has a zoological theme which includes dinosaur "rides". I use the word "rides" loosely because they are educational as well adventurous.

If you are considering Disney, let me know and I could recommend the best resorts and restaurants.

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-24, 01:15 PM
Epcot at Disney is full of science related exhibitions and "rides". Mission to mars is pretty awesome, wish I could explain the "ride". Maybe some here could...
I would expand that suggestion to the entire Disney experience. It's been an incredibly long time since I've been there, but I would assume my experience still applies.
Disney does a great job of combining the "fun" with the "education" in a way that no matter which end, or along the scale you are seeking either, it's still good.* It's not 100%, but on a whole, I think the statement holds.
I've been to many of thier attractions that sound lame, but end up being surprised. (again not 100% because I've also been in "small world")

*No; that's not really a Disney endorsement, because I'm making no claims on other aspects of Disney such as business practices or price, or whatever...just one aspect

megrfl
2008-Oct-24, 01:20 PM
I would expand that suggestion to the entire Disney experience. It's been an incredibly long time since I've been there, but I would assume my experience still applies.
Disney does a great job of combining the "fun" with the "education" in a way that no matter which end, or along the scale you are seeking either, it's still good.* It's not 100%, but on a whole, I think the statement holds.
I've been to many of thier attractions that sound lame, but end up being surprised. (again not 100% because I've also been in "small world")

*No; that's not really a Disney endorsement, because I'm making no claims on other aspects of Disney such as business practices or price, or whatever...just one aspect

Ya, I confess I kinda love the place and spend way too much time there, ummm and I don't mean "the small world", I mean Disney as a whole. :)

JustAFriend
2008-Oct-24, 01:31 PM
You could actually stay at Disney and then just shoot over to see the shuttle launch. Disney probably has a shuttle, or I'm sure there is one available in Orlando that could take you over to KSC.

Except that a couple of million people jam the Beeline Expressway and I-95 before and after the launches trying to do the exact same thing.

There are a number of parks along the Intercoastal Waterway that make excellent places to see the launches but again they are mobbed a couple of hours before each launch. And the businesses WILL have your car towed if you try to use them.

There are a couple of great causeways just to the south of the launch area where you can just park on the side of the road and watch over the Port Canaveral cruise ships. You can see my video of STS-124 here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTKh6y0wIIc). Bring or buy a good pair of binoculars; you can see the bird on the pad from 5 miles away.

But you can get a great view anywhere along the Intercoastal Waterway from Daytona to Melbourne depending on if the Shuttle is heading north or south.

apolloman, you wanted to see an air museum, there is a great private restored collection at Kermit Weeks' Fantasy of Flight Museum (http://www.fantasyofflight.com/), about a 1/2 hour WEST of Orlando on I-4 towards Tampa. Great collection and they FLY and sell rides in a number of the aircraft; dont miss it. There is also a smaller collection at the Tico Valiant Warbird Museum (http://www.vacwarbirds.org/) right there in Titusville. And the Flying Tigers Warbird Museum (http://www.warbirdadventures.com/page11.html) in Orlando or if money is NO object you can even ride in one at Orlando Warbirds (http://1800skyride.com/Planes/Warbirds/Orlando/index.html).

-------------------------------------------------------

I live 2 hours south of the Cape. If there's any more specific info you want ask away.

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-24, 01:37 PM
You can see my video of STS-124 here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTKh6y0wIIc).
Green with envy...

apolloman, you wanted to see an air museum...
Does someone have a listing of this kind of thing? I wouldn't be surprised if there was hidden gems of places all over the country.
I only say this anecdotely based on a trip in the southern Michigan area.
We ended up at some really good space and flight attractions that we probably would never had known about if the rest of the trip weren't so dang boring.

megrfl
2008-Oct-24, 01:50 PM
Except that a couple of million people jam the Beeline Expressway and I-95 before and after the launches trying to do the exact same thing.

Ya, that is why I recommend using a shuttle/bus/van service out of Orlando, besides most likely Orlando International is where he will be coming in, assuming he is from the UK. In addition he indicated that cost is not a problem.

Thanks for the info. on the Kermits Weeks' Fastasy of Flight Museum. We will be checking that out. I got a 14 year old son, who is planning on being an AF pilot and he loves all things to do with aeronautics.

schlaugh
2008-Oct-24, 02:13 PM
Where would be the best place (in the US) to go to see space flight history & modern gear, i.e. Apollo rockets, LM modules, Shuttles, Planetariums, Training centers etc... you know the EXCITING stuff ? Maybe I could see the launch and then go somewhere else.
Like I said, cost isn't a worry.

Well, if you can make that kind of grand tour, then you should also include Washington DC and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. (http://www.nasm.si.edu/)While there be sure to go out to the Udvar Hazy Center. (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasm.si.edu/UdvarHazy/&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=1&usg=AFQjCNGBor2eiDZUhLROs3tssIPxLtZZ3g) It's part of the museum and you can see even larger air and space examples such as the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird and the Space Shuttle Enterprise (used only for testing).

And the rest of the Smithsonian is rather cool too. ;)

mugaliens
2008-Oct-24, 05:28 PM
If you've got a truck camper and supplies, a two week wait isn't much of a problem!

JustAFriend
2008-Oct-26, 01:20 AM
Does someone have a listing of this kind of thing? I wouldn't be surprised if there was hidden gems of places all over the country.


Google, man, google..... US air museums (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=US+air+museums&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq=)

Personal favorites I've visited are:
Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington DC (Dulles Airport)
Air & Space Museum, Washington DC Mall
US Air Force Museum, Dayton OH
US Naval Air Museum, Pensacola FL
Kermit Weeks Museum, Lakeland FL
Warner-Robbins Air Museum, Warner-Robbins GA
Planes of Fame Museum, Chino CA and Grand Canyon AZ
Grissom Air Museum, Peru IN
Pima Air & Space Museum, Tuscon AZ



Where would be the best place (in the US) to go to see space flight history & modern gear, i.e. Apollo rockets, LM modules, Shuttles, Planetariums, Training centers etc... you know the EXCITING stuff ? Maybe I could see the launch and then go somewhere else.
Like I said, cost isn't a worry.

If you want space stuff, the Huntsville Space and Rocket Center (http://www.spacecamp.com/) is EXCELLENT.

And if you're going to be at Canaveral anytime, the Astronaut Hall of Fame and KSC Space Center (http://www.kennedyspacecenter.com/visitKSC/index.asp) is a must.

mugaliens
2008-Oct-26, 01:19 PM
Add:

Little Rock International Airport, AR
Evergreen Aviation Museum, McMinnville, OR
Tillamook Air Museum, Tillamook, OR
Kennedy Space Center, Orsino, FL

And for you online fans...

The National Virtual Museum (24 Hour Museum): http://www.24hourmuseum.org.uk/

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-27, 12:57 PM
Google, man, google..... US air museums (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=US+air+museums&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq=)

Almost 8 million hits...that's my point.
Sometimes you have to go by recommendation or review.

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-28, 01:35 AM
If you want space stuff, the Huntsville Space and Rocket Center is EXCELLENT.
I agree. Say hi to the Space Camp councilors for me!

apolloman
2008-Oct-28, 12:28 PM
thanks for the great ideas & links guys :) this is the exact information I was looking for. what a great place.:)

I'll let you know how this trip goes.

Jeff Root
2008-Oct-28, 12:32 PM
In late February / early March 2002 I went to KSC with three friends to
see the launch of STS-109. That was the last Hubble servicing flight and
the next-to-last flight of Columbia. It was a night launch.

We stayed at a short-term apartment in Winter Park, just north of Orlando.
The day before the scheduled launch was the coldest on record, and the
launch was scrubbed because of the cold just minutes before we were about
to leave for KSC. It was rescheduled for the next day.

We took highway 50 and the NASA causeway to the visitor's center to
pick up our tickets, then doubled back to the mainland and spent a few
hours at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, followed by a few more hours at
the The Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum until it closed, at about
sunset. Then we drove south to Cocoa and took the Merritt Island
causeway to Cocoa Beach. We drove north until we came to a public
beach, where we stopped for a while so that I could stick a finger into
the Atlantic Ocean. :) It got dark while we were there. We continued
north to the south side of Port Canaveral, where we ate at a seafood
place where the fishing boats pulled up right outside the door.

We took the same route back to Titusville, where the side of the road
along the Indian River had filled up with campers and RVs to watch the
launch. We spent a couple of hours hiding out, parked in the Merritt
Island Wildlife Refuge to nap in our vehicle. About midnight we headed
back down to the NASA causeway, which had been rearranged into
separate lanes for visitors and official traffic. I think it took about half
an hour to get across. If I recall correctly, there were some 10,000
people there to see the launch through the visitor's center. About 1 AM
we started boarding buses to the observation sites. The four of us got
into the area for friends and family of the astronauts, six miles straight
south of launch pad A, beside the Banana River. We were warned not
to stray from the site because the perimeter was guarded by alligators.
Launch took place on schedule (it had to of course, to rendezvous with
Hubble) at about 5:30 AM. The sound was about what I would expect
100,000 snare drums would sound like from a few thousand feet away,
if they were all beat at random tempos. There were some clouds, but
I was able to follow the Shuttle for about eight minutes.

After the launch we were bussed back to the visitor's center, where we
looked around until we fell asleep on our feet, about 10 AM. The only
thing I bought in the enormous gift shop (a large building of its own) was
an STS-109 lapel pin. The two neatest things for me were to walk
through the same gangway that the Apollo 11 astronauts took to reach
their capsule (it had been moved down to ground level), and to touch a
piece of the planet Mars. Part of a meteorite which had been identified
as having come from Mars was mounted so that visitors could touch it.
It wasn't labeled very visibly, though, so if you didn't read the sign
carefully, you'd never know it was there!

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

megrfl
2008-Oct-28, 12:54 PM
In late February / early March 2002 I went to KSC with three friends to
see the launch of STS-109. That was the last Hubble servicing flight and
the next-to-last flight of Columbia. It was a night launch.

We stayed at a short-term apartment in Winter Park, just north of Orlando.
The day before the scheduled launch was the coldest on record, and the
launch was scrubbed because of the cold just minutes before we were about
to leave for KSC. It was rescheduled for the next day.

We took highway 50 and the NASA causeway to the visitor's center to
pick up our tickets, then doubled back to the mainland and spent a few
hours at the Astronaut Hall of Fame, followed by a few more hours at
the The Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum until it closed, at about
sunset. Then we drove south to Cocoa and took the Merritt Island
causeway to Cocoa Beach. We drove north until we came to a public
beach, where we stopped for a while so that I could stick a finger into
the Atlantic Ocean. :) It got dark while we were there. We continued
north to the south side of Port Canaveral, where we ate at a seafood
place where the fishing boats pulled up right outside the door.

We took the same route back to Titusville, where the side of the road
along the Indian River had filled up with campers and RVs to watch the
launch. We spent a couple of hours hiding out, parked in the Merritt
Island Wildlife Refuge to nap in our vehicle. About midnight we headed
back down to the NASA causeway, which had been rearranged into
separate lanes for visitors and official traffic. I think it took about half
an hour to get across. If I recall correctly, there were some 10,000
people there to see the launch through the visitor's center. About 1 AM
we started boarding buses to the observation sites. The four of us got
into the area for friends and family of the astronauts, six miles straight
south of launch pad A, beside the Banana River. The launch took place
on schedule (it had to of course, in order to rendezvous with Hubble) at
about 5:30 AM. The sound was about what I would expect 100,000
snare drums would sound like from a few thousand feet away, if they
were all beat at random tempos. There were some clouds, but I was
able to follow the Shuttle for about eight minutes.

After the launch we were bussed back to the visitor's center, where we
looked around until we fell asleep on our feet, about 10 AM. The only
thing I bought in the enormous gift shop (a large building of its own) was
an STS-109 lapel pin. The two neatest things for me were to walk
through the same gangway that the Apollo 11 astronauts took to reach
their capsule (it had been moved down to ground level), and to touch a
piece of the planet Mars. Part of a meteorite which had been identified
as having come from Mars was mounted so that visitors could touch it.
It wasn't labeled very visibly, though, so if you didn't read the sign
carefully, you'd never know it was there!

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Thanks for sharing Jeff. :)

apolloman
2008-Oct-28, 03:50 PM
thanks jeff ! I'll probably be retracing your steps even if I have few more days to enjoy the whole thing so I'll spread it out. Any pictures to share as well ?

By the way, is it possible to visit the Shuttle operations rooms (I can't think of the right word now) in Houston during a shuttle mission ? You know, the ones you see on Nasa TV ? Houston Cap-com etc.
(I'm not really that ignorant but its been a long day and sometimes english words just escape me...)

Maybe somebody has already sent a link to the NASA site regarding this so, if you have, forget this last question. If not ... :)

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-28, 11:57 PM
You're so lucky, Jeff.

waytovietnam
2008-Oct-29, 12:41 AM
By and large the only space-related tourism at KSC is KSC.

Visiting Kennedy (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/visit/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=1&usg=AFQjCNFeLsc245HzYqGz-uHhXTZ0pQ7zmA)
Shuttle Launch Schedule (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=2&usg=AFQjCNGKh2vZrMTIMUEJZJMdA2J2cjTNQg)
View a Shuttle Launch (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/view/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=3&usg=AFQjCNFafMz7D79aaWSNLt03RRgWK7Xj_A)
Next Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=4&usg=AFQjCNEdyerH9sLuhJ32G4lVN2ZoNA4s8Q)
Orlando (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/visit/orlmap.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=5&usg=AFQjCNFPqLqnjpcDWzfI6MNfC3p90-39jQ)
Contact Kennedy (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/information/information-index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=6&usg=AFQjCNGUQe5Ih4zilQJMlFvfefK8xU1KtQ)
Events (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/events/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=7&usg=AFQjCNGqn1kcwMPBq3snkuEeM2F3oJV3Lg)
About Kennedy (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/index.html&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=8&usg=AFQjCNFpB58ZiGoKbMSfiEBT_AC6AJdTpg)

Pretty much all you need to know is in those links. If you don;t want to spend the money, then viewing a shuttle depends on how much time (and energy) that you want to devote to the effort in finding a parking spot near the Cape. The earlier you leave your hotel, house, etc., then the closer you can get to KSC.

Private vehicles are not allowed on KSC grounds during launches so any viewing on KSC property is handled by a private contractor. Please see the lnks for details, planning and costs.

That said, if you just want to get relatively close, you can park on the coast anywhere north or south of the cape and watch from the comfort of your beach chair. I saw Columbia's first launch from Melbourne in 1981 and it was pretty spectacular even that far away.
hi! Michale Quoc,
Thank for your comments. It's useful for me! Thanks!

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-31, 01:35 AM
By the way, is it possible to visit the Shuttle operations rooms (I can't think of the right word now) in Houston during a shuttle mission ? You know, the ones you see on Nasa TV ? Houston Cap-com etc.
(I'm not really that ignorant but its been a long day and sometimes english words just escape me...)
That would be MOCR, or the Mission Operations Control Room. It's pronounced like "poker", only with an "m" instead of a "p".

apolloman
2008-Oct-31, 10:57 AM
MOCR of course :doh:. thanks KaiYeves.

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-01, 01:37 AM
You're welcome.