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View Full Version : Largest Ever Piece of Space Station Junk to Hit Earth Tomorrow



Fraser
2008-Nov-01, 09:40 PM
The Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) weighs 1400 lb (635 kg), is the size of two refrigerators and it's going to drop through the atmosphere some time tomorrow (Sunday, Oct. 2nd). Funny thing is, we don't know where, and we don't precisely know when. Will any of the defunct equipment survive re-entry? We don't know that [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/11/01/largest-ever-piece-of-space-station-junk-to-hit-earth-tomorrow/)

antoniseb
2008-Nov-02, 02:53 PM
How does this thing compare in size to Skylab?

Solid Bismuth
2008-Nov-02, 02:54 PM
You do mean Nov. 2nd, right?

dhd40
2008-Nov-02, 03:22 PM
How does this thing compare in size to Skylab?

It says "the size of two refrigerators"
Well, that could be anything from 0.1 to 50 m (Ive seen one in a butchery)

My best guess is 1,570796327 m :)

schlaugh
2008-Nov-02, 09:16 PM
A) Fraser meant Nov 2, or actually early Nov 3 in Europe. But the time seems to be relatively uncertain.

B) His headline is largest piece of Space Station junk ...i.e the EAS from the ISS.

C) Links to more info (or just Google your own):
ISS space junk re-entry (http://www.southgatearc.org/news/november2008/space_junk_reentry.htm)
Space junk reentry could create fireball Monday - Breaking News ... (http://blog.al.com/breaking/2008/11/space_junk_reentry_could_creat.html)
ISS Space Junk Reentry (http://www.dynaverse.net/forum/index.php?topic=163383769.msg1122920271;topicseen)
Cloudymidnights: ISS Space Junk Reentry (http://cloudymidnights.blogspot.com/2008/11/iss-space-junk-reentry.html)

From NASA:

During the upcoming spacewalk [2007], Anderson will jettison a 1,400-pound (635-kilograms) refrigerator-sized container of ammonia, or Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS), away from the station at a gentle pace of one mile per hour (1.6 kph). He'll also toss a 212-pound (96-kilogram) stanchion used to attach a camera to the space laboratory toward the Earth

JonClarke
2008-Nov-02, 09:40 PM
Wouldn't the de-orbited Jules Verne count as the largest bit of ISS junk?

schlaugh
2008-Nov-02, 10:30 PM
I believe the JV was under control from ESA and instructed to conduct a de-orbit burn. IOW ESA directed Jules Verne into the entry interface.,

Also, I guess, it depends on how one defines "space junk".
Under deorbit control = former satellite capable of being directed into the ocean.
Chucked off by hand = space junk?

JonClarke
2008-Nov-03, 03:58 AM
So to be "space junk" it has to be uncontrolled, not simply surplus to requirements?

antoniseb
2008-Nov-03, 04:47 PM
B) His headline is largest piece of Space Station junk ...i.e the EAS from the ISS.

I thought Skylab was considered our first space-station. You might also consider Mir, but it was deorbited on purpose.

01101001
2008-Nov-03, 06:36 PM
Central Folorida News Channel 13 (http://www.cfnews13.com/News/National/2008/11/3/space_junk_falls_harmlessly_in_south_pacific.html)
A refrigerator-sized piece of space junk fell harmlessly into the South Pacific Sunday night, according to NASA.

Swift
2008-Nov-03, 08:45 PM
Too bad. We probably won't get any good pictures.

schlaugh
2008-Nov-04, 10:04 PM
I thought Skylab was considered our first space-station. You might also consider Mir, but it was deorbited on purpose.

Yes, if you read "space station" to mean any inhabited orbiting object deorbitied without regard to where it came back, then Skylab would win the US prize, hands down (or maybe "heads down" would be more appropriate especially if you lived in Australia then).

But I think Fraser was specifically referring to the largest piece of hardware from the ISS.