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01101001
2008-Nov-05, 07:00 PM
The upcoming Glory mission (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2008/sep/HQ_08242_GLORY_Mission.html) is collecting names to be carried on the spacecraft during its Earth-orbit travels.

I've summarized the spacecraft that have carried publicly submitted names in a couple of articles, but maybe it makes sense to have one topic devoted to the topic, if only to note each subsequent opportunity.

Here's the list I gathered once upon a time in an article in BAUT topic New Horizons Spacecraft (dead link) (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/73905-new-horizons-spacecraft.html#post1238707), cleaned up (and to be maintained as long as I have edit rights):

Akatsuki (PLANET-C) http://venus.star2009.jp/index_e.php
Beagle 2 http://www.beagle2.com/index.htm; (Edit: See djellison comment below.)
Cassini http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/releases/96/cdsign.html
Dawn http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/feature_stories/sendnames_install.asp
Deep Impact http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/sendyourname/index.html (not maintained)
Glory http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2008/sep/HQ_08242_GLORY_Mission.html
Hayabusa (MUSES-C)http://www.isas.ac.jp/e/snews/2005/1130_tm.shtml
Hayabusa 2 http://www.planetary.org/get-involved/messages/hayabusa-2/
Huygens (on the Cassini spacecraft) http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMUPZWDE2E_index_0.html
IKAROS (with LightSail) http://planetary.org/special/fromearth/sail
Kaguya (SELENE) http://www.jaxa.jp/pr/event/selene/index_e.html
Kepler http://www.seti.org/kepler/names/
LightSail 1 (with IKAROS) http://planetary.org/special/fromearth/sail
LightSail 2 (#SelfieToSpace) http://www.planetary.org/get-involved/messages/lightsail/
LRO Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter http://lro.jhuapl.edu/NameToMoon/index.php
Mars Insight http://mars.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/insight/
Mars Maven http://lasp.colorado.edu/maven/goingtomars/send-your-name/
Mars Polar Lander (failed) http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/releases/98/m98integ.html
Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity rover) http://mars9.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/participate/sendyourname/index.cfm
MER Mars Exploration Rover (Spirit and Opportunity) http://spacekids.hq.nasa.gov/2003/namequery.htm
New Horizons http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/ecard/certificate/searchName.php
Orion first flight http://mars.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/orion-first-flight
OSIRIS-REx http://www.planetary.org/get-involved/messages/bennu/
Phoenix http://planetary.org/special/fromearth/phoenix
Stardust http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/overview/microchip/
STS-133 Shuttle Mission http://faceinspace.nasa.gov
STS-134 Shuttle Mission http://faceinspace.nasa.gov

A few sets of names went to the bottom of an Earth ocean:
Mars 96 (on MAPEx experiment chip)
Cosmos 1 (on CD)
Glory (on microchip)

The cancelled 2001 Mars Lander mission collected names (and the names were transferred to the MER mission)

BAUT topic Project Gutenberg... (dead link) (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/10987-project-gutenberg.html) has some discussion of names in space from years ago, with some detail about the media.

News article about names on spacecraft: Wall Street Journal: Message in a Bottle (http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB113751632447848689-5m3tp2RFUQU7FrdPlxAvNc7s7Hs_20070122.html?mod=tff_ main_tff_top)

A Portrait of Humanity (http://www.jonlomberg.com/portrait.pdf) (PDF) describes the cancelled Huygens diamond disk and offers thoughts about messages to spacecraft discoverers, by Jon Lomberg, who designed the Voyager record.

Planetary Society Weblog: Our members are flying on Glory (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001726/) mentions the upcoming Glory mission and lists the missions on which a list of Planetary Society members has flown. That's a good way to ride along on all missions without constant vigilance: Get and maintain membership in the Planetary Society (http://www.planetary.org/home/). They'll be vigilant for you. See Planetary Society: Messages from Earth (http://planetary.org/special/messages) (or newer Planetary Society: Projects: Messages from Earth (http://planetary.org/programs/projects/messages/)).

Voyager 1 and 2 carried their famous golden disks (http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/goldenrec.html) of text, photos, sounds, but public names weren't invited aboard. Carl Sagan's book "Murmurs of Earth" describes the making and contents. And, craft before that, Pioneer 10 and 11, Apollo landers, and so forth had plaques or carried mementos, too, also without direct public participation.

If you know or hear of more public-names-in-space projects, add them to the thread.

Keywords: send your name into space to space aboard spacecraft mission

Swift
2008-Nov-05, 07:25 PM
The upcoming Glory mission (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2008/sep/HQ_08242_GLORY_Mission.html) is collecting names to be carried on the spacecraft during its Earth-orbit travels.

Ok, I'm in there now. One curious thing - they have one of those little boxes where you enter the letters you see in an image, to keep the spambots out.

Are spammers trying to load their names onto Glory? Why would anyone care? :confused:

01101001
2008-Nov-05, 08:02 PM
Are spammers trying to load their names onto Glory? Why would anyone care? :confused:

It might still be a good idea. I once had an idea of a civil-disobedience act of archiving, with automation, a large volume of some copyrighted, claimed-trade-secret text onto a space-bound microchip, disguised as names. This was back in the days where the entirety of such lists were made readable. I figured if I could sneak it into space then people of the future might have access to it. I'd announce the fact after launch, and make the owner try to sue NASA for its return or destruction. (Or, I'd not announce it and just let it be discovered, as a secret-for-a-time copy, on the Web.)

But that would be wrong. Of course.

It seems lately, the only reading you can do of such a list is to verify the presence of a submitted name, perhaps retrieving an associated certificate number. For a long time I haven't seen one that you could actually browse.

Yeah, I don't see the purpose in trying to defeat spammers, people doing business or promoting something. There's not much motive in it for them. But, I do see the purpose in trying to defeat automated bulk submissions -- to defeat people who might implement my sort of wrong idea. Did I mention it was wrong? And, it was just an idea.

djellison
2008-Nov-05, 08:10 PM
Did Beagle 2 do it? I'm not sure that it did.

Doug

01101001
2008-Nov-05, 08:31 PM
Did Beagle 2 do it? I'm not sure that it did.


I'm not 100% sure. More like 10%. I heard it somewhere, no details, but I'm seeking evidence. I'll edit the original to indicate more skepticism.

djellison
2008-Nov-05, 10:34 PM
I followed B2 like a hawk- set up a Yahoo Group to collate news and info - and I don't ever remember it coming up, that's all. Spot paintings, Blur ring tones, but no name-collection.


Doug

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-05, 11:35 PM
I'd announce the fact after launch, and make the owner try to sue NASA for its return or destruction. (Or, I'd not announce it and just let it be discovered, as a secret-for-a-time copy, on the Web.)

But that would be wrong. Of course.
Of COURSE it would be wrong! Only a real dirt-bag would try to get NASA sued on purpose for something that wasn't their fault.

John Jaksich
2008-Nov-15, 07:30 AM
As member of the Planetary Society--I am fairly sure that it was the so-called brain-child of the late Carl Sagan...that in order to generate as much interest as publicly possible---they would put names on space-craft--I am under the impression that, prior to the "TPS" initiatives--NASA may have also put names onto lunar modules as well--that being: astronauts, those who constructed the spacecraft, among other engineering folk of JPL and NASA. However, my memory is a bit fuzzy on the Apollo missions---- someone may have to correct me.

LaurelHS
2008-Nov-15, 07:45 AM
JayUtah mentioned Grumman employees writing their names on the LM descent stages in a thread at Apollohoax. Go to reply #183.

http://apollohoax.proboards21.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=theories&thread=709&page=13

01101001
2008-Nov-16, 04:09 AM
I was just reading the Wikipedia article on STS-126 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-126) and learned there has been a somewhat regular program of dragging student names onboard shuttle missions.

Lockheed Martin Space Day (http://www.spaceday.org/index.php/About-Sub-2.html)


A centerpiece to the Space DaySM program is the Student Signatures in SpaceŽ (S3) project, which gives elementary and middle school students the opportunity to send their personal signatures into space. Lockheed Martin and NASA have partnered to present the S3 program.

The goal of the Student Signatures in Space program is to pique students' interest in space by getting them "personally" involved in a space shuttle mission.
[...]
Signatures from Space Day 2008 are expected to fly on STS-126, which is currently scheduled for launch in November 2008.

The first Student Signatures in Space project was held to celebrate Space Day 1997 when more than 96,000 signatures from over 220 U.S. elementary schools traveled aboard Shuttle-Mir docking mission STS-86 in September 1997. Since then, the program has included thousands of schools. To date, more than five million signatures have flown on various missions, including STS-95, the historic shuttle mission that returned Senator John Glenn to space.

It looks like every year one shuttle mission carries collected student names into space.

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-17, 03:45 PM
...there has been a somewhat regular program of dragging student names on board shuttle missions.
Dragging?
I just keep picturing a mailbag full of signatures too heavy to lift. :lol:

I sounds like a good program, but there's something I don't understand.
What is the media for the signitures?


Participants return the posters to Lockheed Martin, and the signatures are digitally captured from the posters. NASA then includes the signatures in the manifest of a U.S. space shuttle mission.
Ok; so far, so good. That tells me some form of digital media.

Now; here's my confusion.

Having signatures flown on the Space Shuttle is a rare treat as space is extremely limited on each mission. Space requirements limit us to only approximately 500 schools per year
Maybe it's just worded funny, and maybe "space" requirements is making this ambiguous.
Just how big are these bits and bytes?

01101001
2008-Nov-17, 06:39 PM
Just how big are these bits and bytes?

Let me grab this envelope...

Large signed posters like the one depicted, with hundreds, to thousands, of signatures, if scanned to be readable later, say 300dpi, would be multi-megabytes each.

It all depends on what kind of quality they pursue. If they don't care, they could cram a lot more in. Just crank up the compression. But, I expect they preserve the disk when the mission ends (other spacecraft missions have had their public-name media copied to the Smithsonian museum) and they really should aim for readability. I'd hate for any kid to have to hear: "Well, no, your name isn't actually readable on the disc that goes into space."

I don't expect the described disc is more than a single DVD. At 500+ schools and assuming just one poster/school, that provides only about 10 megabytes per image. To me, that's cutting it close. But I think it's in the ballpark.

Of course they could send up more disks -- at some incremental cost to NASA of weight and volume.

More conspiratorially, maybe Lockheed Martin is eager to limit it to 500 schools just to hold down their own management and production costs, and then they blame it on space constraints when it's really their own budget contraint. Or, maybe it's merely a Cialidini-type artificial limit that influences more participation by schools.

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-17, 06:53 PM
...say 300dpi...At 500+ schools...one poster/school...
That actually makes some sense. I'm sure there's an agreement to a single disk to keep it from going out of hand.

But;

More conspiratorially, maybe Lockheed Martin is eager to limit it to 500 schools just to hold down their own management and production costs, and then they blame it on space constraints when it's really their own budget contraint. Or, maybe it's merely a Cialidini-type artificial limit that influences more participation by schools.
Makes more sense to me and what I really suspect.

Superluminal
2008-Nov-19, 02:37 AM
What about Mars Science Lab? Will we be able to put names on it?

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-19, 10:39 PM
If we can, I'm so going to!

01101001
2008-Nov-22, 05:56 AM
What about Mars Science Lab? Will we be able to put names on it?

I'd expect it. It's a little early, to judge by the scheduling of other names programs. I'd look for an announcement in the new year.

01101001
2009-Jun-23, 12:55 AM
What about Mars Science Lab? Will we be able to put names on it?

Just noticed this list needs an update. Will amend above.

Mars Science Laboratory: Send your name to Mars (http://mars9.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/participate/sendyourname/index.cfm)

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-23, 04:21 PM
My whole family's names are now on Curiosity, thanks!

mahesh
2009-Jun-26, 05:42 PM
My baby Flynn is ecstatic. Rapturous, beyond belief!
He has also taken the link to his school. For his friends to send their names too.

Thanks Zero One & Superluminal & and y'all!

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-26, 05:59 PM
My grandmother went around telling everybody that her name was going to Mars at our recent family get-together.

She said she never imagined she'd be able to do things like this when she was a kid.

01101001
2009-Oct-24, 05:17 AM
Send your name to Venus (http://venus.star2009.jp/index_e.php) on board the Japanese Akatsuki mission.

Description: Planetary Society Blog: Send your name to Venus with Venus Climate Orbiter (PLANET-C), now known as Akatsuki (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002177/)

Cool. Etched on an aluminum plate no less.

ravens_cry
2009-Oct-24, 06:40 AM
Send your name to Venus (http://venus.star2009.jp/index_e.php) on board the Japanese Akatsuki mission.

Description: Planetary Society Blog: Send your name to Venus with Venus Climate Orbiter (PLANET-C), now known as Akatsuki (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002177/)

Cool. Etched on an aluminum plate no less.
I did it. I wrote, "I hope to float in your skies in person." And now that's going to Venus. *squee!*

publiusr
2009-Oct-26, 07:29 PM
I put "Aphrodite, call me Cupid"

KaiYeves
2009-Oct-27, 12:48 AM
I put "Godspeed Akatsuki to Venus!"

TheMan2Astro
2009-Nov-02, 12:46 AM
40%

mugaliens
2009-Nov-02, 09:01 AM
How about Calvin and Hobbs?

Staunch defenders of the universe!

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-03, 12:15 AM
"We are intrepid explorers, lost isn't in our vocabulary!"

01101001
2010-May-15, 02:15 AM
Planetary Society Blog: Photos of your names on the IKAROS spacecraft (http://planetary.org/blog/article/00002488/)


Earlier this week we received some awesome photos of the silica glass DVD provided to JAXA by The Planetary Society being mounted on the spacecraft. This all happened on April 25. If you're a member, or if you signed up on our website, your name is on this disk, and will fly past Venus with IKAROS!

Let's go sailing!

KaiYeves
2010-May-15, 10:05 PM
Let's go sailing!
Yes, let's! Beyond the sunset and to the baths of all the western stars!

(Yes, my friends, this is what passes for poetry geek humor.)

Sardonicone
2010-May-16, 04:08 AM
Just letting everyone know the Mars Laboratory link is still valid. Signed myself, the misses, and my kid to it tonight.

01101001
2010-Jun-13, 01:37 AM
(As reported in an article in topic STS-133 Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/104801-STS-133-Shuttle-Mission?p=1745400#post1745400))

MEDIA ADVISORY: M10-091 : NASA INVITES THE PUBLIC TO PICTURE THEIR "FACE IN SPACE" (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/jun/M10-091_Face_in_Space.txt)


HOUSTON -- NASA is inviting members of the public to send electronic
images of their faces into orbit aboard one of the final remaining
space shuttle missions.

Visitors to the "Face in Space" website can upload their portrait to
fly with the astronauts aboard shuttle Discovery's STS-133 mission
and/or shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission. Participants will receive
special certificates from the Internet site once the mission is
completed.

NASA Face In Space (http://faceinspace.nasa.gov)

slang
2011-Jun-09, 06:12 PM
Last chance to Send Your Name to Mars! Closes June 13, 2011.

--> LINK (http://marsparticipate.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/participate/sendyourname/) <--

01101001
2014-Jan-18, 06:20 AM
OSIRIS-REx mission to asteroid Bennu
Launch 2016
Return sample to Earth 2023
http://www.planetary.org/get-involved/messages/bennu/

grapes
2014-Jan-18, 02:35 PM
:) :) :) :)

KaiYeves
2014-Jan-18, 03:11 PM
Already did it! Let's go to an asteroid!

Swift
2014-Jan-18, 03:55 PM
By the way, hi Binary Man http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/elderscrolls/images/5/53/Wave_Smiley_Emoticon.gif

ravens_cry
2014-Jan-19, 09:39 PM
A delightful numerical coincidence, the numbers on my participation number add up to 11, and the number 11 is in the sequence itself.
It don't mean nothing, but it's funny nonetheless.

01101001
2014-Oct-09, 03:03 AM
Send your name on a microchip on NASA Orion first flight:
http://mars.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/orion-first-flight

Last Day to Register: Oct. 31, 2014

Orion Flight Test launch window: Dec. 4-6, 2014

Parent site: Send Your Name to Mars (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/)

01101001
2015-Aug-20, 03:40 AM
As reported here: http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?158162-NASA-Invites-Public-to-%91Send-Your-Name-to-Mars%92-on-InSight-%96-Next-Red-Planet-Lander

In Universe Today: http://www.universetoday.com/121940/nasa-invites-public-to-send-your-name-to-mars-on-insight-next-red-planet-lander/

Mars Insight lander (Introduction http://insight.jpl.nasa.gov/home.cfm)

Send your name on Mars Insight: http://mars.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/insight/

Last Day to Register: September 8, 2015 (Midnight ET USA)

Earth Launch: March 4 - March 30, 2016
Mars Landing: September 28, 2016

publiusr
2015-Aug-22, 07:48 PM
If a large enough solar sail were placed in LEO, you could use it as a billboard, I suppose. Ad space right there.

01101001
2016-Apr-06, 03:40 PM
An opportunity passed: Planetary Society LightSail 2: http://www.planetary.org/get-involved/messages/lightsail/

Mention of the mini-DVD being delivered: http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2016/20160328-mini-DVD-delivered.html


The 8-centimeter disc will be mounted on the outboard side of the spacecraft's avionics section and covered with a thermal blanket, which helps regulate temperatures inside the tiny CubeSat. LightSail 2 measures 10 by 10 by 30 centimeters, and will be installed in Georgia Tech's Prox-1 spacecraft. Together, the duo will hitch a ride to orbit aboard the first operational flight of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket. A launch date has not been finalized.

I updated the master list in article #1 (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?80945-Names-on-Spacecraft&p=1358571#post1358571).