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NovaJoe
2008-Nov-09, 10:36 AM
have been working on a theory for several years that is turning out better then I could have ever dreamed. Quite accidently, working on relativistic conceptions I was able to combine the standard model with a relativistic theory of gravity, uniting the four fundamental forces with electromagnetism. The problem I am faced with now, is getting this relativistic conception related with mathematical descriptions of relativity in association to the standard model, specifically the nuclear strong and weak forces. I simply don’t know Calculus and I was just hoping that some out there could point me in the right direction or at least help me understand what some of the crazy looking symbols stand for? I would certainly be grateful to anyone who could help in any way they can......Im goanna need all the help I can get to understand some of the hieroglyphs.

Thanks to those who took concern,

NovaJoe

mugaliens
2008-Nov-09, 11:06 AM
I simply don’t know Calculus and...

That's ok. Lot's of proponents of various theories which challange mainstream thinking come up a little shy in the math department.

Since math is the foundation and technically precise descriptive language upon which gravity, strong nuclear, weak nuclear, and electromagnetic forces are unified, you'll find the battle very steep indeed without the proper use of math.


I was just hoping that some out there could point me in the right direction or at least help me understand what some of the crazy looking symbols stand for? I would certainly be grateful to anyone who could help in any way they can......Im goanna need all the help I can get to understand some of the hieroglyphs.

Thanks to those who took concern,

NovaJoe

I would begin with this article (http://math.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_purpose_of_calculus), which describes the very basics of calculus. I would then read through Wikipedia's entry on Calculus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calculus), and finally, head off to your local community college or 4-year university to the math department. Tell them you'd like to learn the math required to describe your theories, and ask them for their advice. They will probably recommend you attend a couple of years of the same math taken by math, engineering, and science students, before you'll possess enough of the basics to sort of get the general idea behind such things as differential calculus, which is used to describe both Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism and Einstein's theory of general relativity.

There really aren't any shortcuts, I'm afraid, and despite having three full years of such math in college, while I'm able to understand the basics of where they're going with the math, I do not know enough to reproduce their efforts, much less develop an rigorous, sound theories of my own.

That doesn't stop me from learning, in plain old English, the intracacies of their theories, how they apply to the real world, what it means for me, or our society, and future possibilities - that's something that most people can share.

Digix
2008-Nov-09, 09:00 PM
I don't think that mathematic is hard if you don't go into multidimensional calculations after all even most advanced math is made of the basic stuff like multiplication or addition.
In case of single dimension all theories are quite simple but you cant get any practically useful results

multidimensional calculations also are not so hard if you make computer do them in brutal way but in that case you cant derive any formulas.
basically all that hard looking math is quite simple in reality all you need is do it in stupid way. That is what mosts of scientists are doing today they just stuff all that into some supercomputer leave it for few days ant check the result.

what hieroglyphs you do not understand?
if there is something unknown to you just check wikipedia.

hhEb09'1
2008-Nov-09, 09:14 PM
I simply don’t know Calculus and I was just hoping that some out there could point me in the right direction or at least help me understand what some of the crazy looking symbols stand for? I would certainly be grateful to anyone who could help in any way they can......Im goanna need all the help I can get to understand some of the hieroglyphs.Welcome to BAUT, we're glad to help. We've done this before.

Quite accidently, working on relativistic conceptions I was able to combine the standard model with a relativistic theory of gravity, uniting the four fundamental forces with electromagnetism. Are you counting electromagnetism as one of the four fundamental forces?

Argos
2008-Nov-10, 01:57 PM
Without knowing maths, how can you be sure you´ve stumbled on a a new thing? Unification of fundamental forces is essentially mathematics.

stu
2008-Nov-11, 03:09 AM
Without knowing maths, how can you be sure you´ve stumbled on a a new thing? Unification of fundamental forces is essentially mathematics.

Agreed. Especially considering that these forces themselves are described mathematically, generally through differential equations (as in Calc 4 at most colleges (2 semesters of calculus, 3rd semester is multi-variate calculus, 4th is differential equations)).

cjl
2008-Nov-11, 04:52 AM
Correct, although it isn't called calc 4 here, and they've combined it with linear algebra.

(I'm taking Diff EQ right now)

thorkil2
2008-Nov-12, 09:09 PM
It won't be nearly as simple as getting definitions for the "crazy looking symbols." Knowing what an integral is isn't much help if you don't know how to use it. Best advice, go learn the math you need, to do what you want to do. You won't find simple shortcuts here or anywhere else.

DrRocket
2008-Nov-12, 09:28 PM
have been working on a theory for several years that is turning out better then I could have ever dreamed. Quite accidently, working on relativistic conceptions I was able to combine the standard model with a relativistic theory of gravity, uniting the four fundamental forces with electromagnetism. The problem I am faced with now, is getting this relativistic conception related with mathematical descriptions of relativity in association to the standard model, specifically the nuclear strong and weak forces. I simply don’t know Calculus and I was just hoping that some out there could point me in the right direction or at least help me understand what some of the crazy looking symbols stand for? I would certainly be grateful to anyone who could help in any way they can......Im goanna need all the help I can get to understand some of the hieroglyphs.

Thanks to those who took concern,

NovaJoe

hhEb09'1's response is right on target.

The level of mathematics that is involved in the subjects that you mention is quite a bit beyond calculus, or even that seen by undergraduate mathematics and physics majors. You can start from scratch and learn it, but it will be a major effort, requiring several years. Mathematics is a big subject. Even professional mathematicians don't understand all of it.

Let me propose a different tack. Suppose that you try to explain your idea with regard to the unification of the known forces. Don't get too hung up on the mathematics, but just try to explain your ideas clearly with whatever tools are comfortable to you. Be clear, and lay it out in small steps, as simple as possible.

Then some of us with a bit more background in mathematics might be able to help you or to steer you towards those parts of mathematics that are most applicable.

Also do not be discouraged. It may turn out that you really don't have a solution. But neither does anyone else. And there are some really smart people who are trying to construct a unified theory. It is a VERY difficult task.

If it turns out that you have solved the greatest problem extant in physics, then that will be quite an accomplishment. If it turns out that there is a flaw in your reasoning, do not be surprised when that is pointed out. Making mistakes is one of the best ways of learning, so long as those mistakes are recognized and you learn from them.