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View Full Version : I'am Back



Kaptain K
2008-Nov-12, 07:32 PM
Hi folks. I do not know how often i'll be abe to log on, but I'm back for now!

The Backroad Astronomer
2008-Nov-12, 07:35 PM
welcome back Kaptain.

Van Rijn
2008-Nov-12, 07:43 PM
Yes! Good to see you here.

01101001
2008-Nov-12, 07:44 PM
Hey!

Torsten
2008-Nov-12, 07:44 PM
Excellent!

Good to have you back.

mahesh
2008-Nov-12, 07:50 PM
welcome back Kaptain!
have you grabbed some kind of lunch yet?
nice to see you.

Swift
2008-Nov-12, 08:07 PM
Hey Kaptain, great to see you back.

Gillianren
2008-Nov-12, 08:26 PM
It's a great relief to see you again.

Kaptain K
2008-Nov-12, 08:38 PM
The good news is that I'm back on the net, the bad news is that I'm still in the hospital and will be for an indefinite period of time. I am getting better slowly but surely. I'll give more details later.

Nicolas
2008-Nov-12, 08:48 PM
Good to see you here again! All the best with the recovery.

Swift
2008-Nov-12, 08:57 PM
The good news is that I'm back on the net, the bad news is that I'm still in the hospital and will be for an indefinite period of time. I am getting better slowly but surely. I'll give more details later.
I would suggest that you tell your Physical Therapist that typing posts at BAUT is an important part of your PT, but then the hospital would want to bill you for it. ;)

Tensor
2008-Nov-12, 09:29 PM
Good to see you back kaptain. You were missed.

chrissy
2008-Nov-12, 09:47 PM
Glad your back Kaptain, can we hand the bridge back to you now? :p

Moose
2008-Nov-12, 09:49 PM
Heeeey. Good to see you back, Kaptain. :D

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-12, 09:57 PM
Brother Paul again. I decided to join BAUT because I want to be part of a group of people who think so highly of each other that they freely give whatever resources they have at their disposal so that valued members may continue to be part of the group. In today's society it's hard to find people like that in person; maybe they're all lurking on the internet? Anyway, I want to thank publicly all of you who have expressed your concern about my big brother (Kaptain K to you) and especially to DonnieB, whose generosity makes Kaptain K's presence here possible. (*tear in throat, lump in eye*)
Piano Paul

Nicolas
2008-Nov-12, 10:04 PM
^^^^^^^
If only all first posts were like that.

Welcome to the club Paul. I do believe it is not really necessary to point this one new member to the rules, as you seem to be quite familiar with the concept "be polite". ;)

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-12, 10:05 PM
My second post. tinaa has Kaptain K's contact info should anyone wish to call him...

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-12, 10:10 PM
^^^^^^^
If only all first posts were like that.

Welcome to the club Paul. I do believe it is not really necessary to point this one new member to the rules, as you seem to be quite familiar with the concept "be polite". ;)

Thanks for the welcome. I like to think I'm level-headed and reasonable. I'm also over 50, which means that, while I know what to "flame" is, I choose not to participate. You'll never see me YELL WITH CAPS (demonstration only) and I most likely won't post if my opinion is too sharply in conflict with the majority. In other words, "discretion is the better part of valor." I'm also usually pretty happy, so if someone tries to tick me off they're probably wasting their time.

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-12, 10:28 PM
Welcome back to BAUT!

slang
2008-Nov-12, 10:34 PM
Welcome to BAUT as a member, piano paul, and welcome back Kaptain! Get well soon.

Donnie B.
2008-Nov-12, 10:42 PM
Kaptain: glad to see the little toy is humming along. As you can see, it should make a lot of folks happy now that you can chime in from time to time.

Paul: nice to see you decided to join! You aren't alone, we have plenty of gray-temple folks around here, and a deep understanding of astronomy isn't required. At most you need to be the sort that goes "oooh!" when you see a new picture from Hubble.

Tip for the Kap: if you find yourself on a web site that has too-small text, use <ctrl>+ (Control-plus) to upsize it. It works in Firefox, not sure about IE.

Swift
2008-Nov-12, 10:45 PM
And three cheers to Donnie B. for his generous gift.

geonuc
2008-Nov-12, 11:55 PM
Welcome back. :)

Whirlpool
2008-Nov-13, 12:19 AM
Welcome Back Kaptain K . Get Well Fast.

Thanks Donnie for the kind hearted gift to Kap.

Hang in there Kap . Stay Strong and Keep Smiling.

:)

Tinaa
2008-Nov-13, 02:21 AM
Hi Kapt. Great to see you here!

cjl
2008-Nov-13, 02:35 AM
Welcome back :D

Good to see you!

Tobin Dax
2008-Nov-13, 05:30 AM
Good to see you back, Kaptain K.

mfumbesi
2008-Nov-13, 06:23 AM
Welcome back.....
The Kaptain is alive and well.

Argos
2008-Nov-13, 01:42 PM
Good news at last! Welcome back Kaptain. Get well soon. :)

Tensor
2008-Nov-14, 11:53 AM
Welcome Piano Paul. Always nice to see a new poster. Thank you Donnie B for getting the Kaptain up and running.

mike alexander
2008-Nov-14, 03:45 PM
Shalom aleichem, Kaptain; 'morning, Paul.

Donnie, you're a mensch.

Kaptain K
2008-Nov-15, 01:33 AM
Words do not exist to express my feelings. I am lucky to be alive.
I came unbeleivably close to joining Maksotov! My last conscious memory is of logging off the internet on Sept. 5th. My brother (Piano Paul) found me passed out on my bed on Sept.7th and callled an ambulance. My temp was 107f!!! I My next conscious memory is waking up in the hospital in mid-October! From what I've learned since, I spent 17 days in the intensive care unit of one hospital (Brackenridge) before being transfered here (St. David's). I'm damn lucky to be alive, much less in possession of (at least most of) my faculties.

I won't be posting as much as I used to. Not only do they keep me busy with therapies, they wear me out. I'll post as much as I can.

cjl
2008-Nov-15, 05:06 AM
107F?

Wow - it's a great thing that he found you in time. Good luck with the therapy.

Moose
2008-Nov-15, 12:21 PM
Yeek, Kaptain! Glad you've decided to forego the honor for a good while. Good luck with the therapy. :)

mugaliens
2008-Nov-15, 12:28 PM
It's threads like this which underscore the unique nature of BAUT as an online community. I'm glad "The Big K" is back and returning to good health, and am also pleased at Paul's participation, here.

suntrack2
2008-Nov-15, 02:38 PM
That's fine looking you ok now, Kaptain.

hhEb09'1
2008-Nov-15, 03:30 PM
Welcome back Karl :)

Kaptain K
2008-Nov-15, 09:44 PM
I don't know how many here are aware of the significance of 1070, especially those who use the metric system, but 1080 is usually considered fatal! As I said, I am lucky to be alive.

Nicolas
2008-Nov-15, 09:52 PM
It's threads like this which underscore the unique nature of BAUT as an online community. I'm glad "The Big K" is back and returning to good health, and am also pleased at Paul's participation, here.

Call it special, not unique. I say that because I frequent another board where the community feeling is very strong too. it helps that most people are from Belgium and the Netherlands there.

We've had quite some medical issues overthere too the last months. One member's wife was held in coma for over 2 weeks. He'd post the progress twice a day, we'd read and react. It was great therapy for him to be able to write it all off.

You do sound lucky to have survived that indeed, Kaptain K. I am glad to tell you that absolutely nothing happened in the world between early september and mid october. Except for that global crisis.

hhEb09'1
2008-Nov-15, 10:20 PM
BTW, I'm conferring upon you the BAUT degree °. Now, you can think deep thoughts.

Kaptain K
2008-Nov-15, 10:26 PM
I am glad to tell you that absolutely nothing happened in the world between early september and mid october
Except Hurricane Ike (only the third most destuctive (dollarwise) in US history!

Tobin Dax
2008-Nov-16, 03:44 AM
BTW, I'm conferring upon you the BAUT degree °. Now, you can think deep thoughts.
You have to admit that a temperature of 1 could be fatal. :)

107° F and 108° F are about 42° C, for those who are curious.

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-17, 08:51 PM
QUOTE My last conscious memory is of logging off the internet on Sept. 5th. My brother (Piano Paul) found me passed out on my bed on Sept.7th and callled an ambulance. My temp was 107f!!! QUOTE

The doctor I spoke with at the hospital told me that if I'd waited until after the Dallas Cowboys football game to go check on the Kaptain it would have been too late. For those of you not familiar with American football, that's three hours. Talk about cutting it close! Once again it reminds me to remind everyone to listen to that "still, small voice" inside your head and, more importantly, to act on it. That's why the Kaptain is still here!

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-17, 08:52 PM
[QUOTE=Piano Paul;1367502]QUOTE My last conscious memory is of logging off the internet on Sept. 5th. My brother (Piano Paul) found me passed out on my bed on Sept.7th and callled an ambulance. My temp was 107f!!! QUOTE]

I meant for that last post to look like this? I was quoting the Kaptain...

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-17, 08:53 PM
Y'all know what I mean. I am still getting used to the BAUT format. Whatever, the Kaptain IS lucky, and I'm grateful he's still here.

Gillianren
2008-Nov-17, 09:04 PM
So are we all, I assure you!

mahesh
2008-Nov-18, 02:00 AM
Thank you Mr 'Piano Paul'.

It's fantastic that that 'small voice' speaks thunderously. and a warmest welcome to you Sir, at BAUT!

mahesh
2008-Nov-18, 02:11 AM
I am truly awe-struck. And I would like to extend my best wishes to you both, and your near and dear ones.

mahesh
2008-Nov-19, 11:19 PM
Kaptain K! Just as I was logging-in, I found an interesting piece of a conversation you had, as if floating in space, for me to pick up, just 'outside the door' here,
i mean, this is seven years old, give or take a few hours....hope it links or something...
let me edit it ...gradually...i'll post it and come back. or else might lose it all together....i like the sense of humour flowing through it....you guys are great...

quotes:

View Full Version : # of photons
******
brianok
13-November-2001, 08:08 PM
Looking at one of the faintest stars observable, I wondered how many photons per second would be striking my eyeball from a star hundreds or thousands of light years away? Would it be a few hundred, thousands, or are we into millions?
*******
Donnie B.
13-November-2001, 08:48 PM
On 2001-11-13 15:08, brianok wrote:
Looking at one of the faintest stars observable, I wondered how many photons per second would be striking my eyeball from a star hundreds or thousands of light years away? Would it be a few hundred, thousands, or are we into millions?


I don't know the answer to your question, but I do know that if you use a really good cryogenically-cooled CCD sensor, you can count individual photons.
*******

Bob
13-November-2001, 08:51 PM
A first magnitude star delivers a couple of million photons per square centimeter per second of visible light to an observer on Earth. If your iris is, let's say, a tenth of a square centimeter in area, your eye is admitting a couple of hundred thousand photons per second. The number of photons per second from that tsource falls off as the square of the distance, and the ultimate sensitivity of the eye is about 10 photons per second. You can do the math.
**********

Kaptain K
13-November-2001, 09:18 PM
OK, I did the math. Assuming:
1) The photon flux from a 1st magnitude star is (as you state) 2x10^6 photons/second.
2) Maximum dilation of the human eye is 7mm (area = 0.49 cm*2).
3) Faintest star visible to the unaided eye is 6th magnitude.
Given: Five magnitudes difference in brightness equals 100:1 flux ratio (by definition).
Therefore: "Ultimate sensitivity of the human eye" 10,000 photons/second.
******

GrapesOfWrath
14-November-2001, 10:46 AM
This site (http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/v27n4/aas187/S098001.html) says a ninth mag. star has "a return signal of about 0.2 photons per square cm per msec." So, let's see...that's about an order of magnitude lower, isn't it?
******

Bob
14-November-2001, 11:27 PM
On 2001-11-13 16:18, Kaptain K wrote:
OK, I did the math. Assuming:
1) The photon flux from a 1st magnitude star is (as you state) 2x10^6 photons/second.
2) Maximum dilation of the human eye is 7mm (area = 0.49 cm*2).
3) Faintest star visible to the unaided eye is 6th magnitude.
Given: Five magnitudes difference in brightness equals 100:1 flux ratio (by definition).
Therefore: "Ultimate sensitivity of the human eye" 10,000 photons/second.
***

1) The star in question for this 2,000,000 photons/sec/cm**2 factoid is Vega, whch is zero, not first, magnitude. Sorry for the error.
2) I assumed an iris area of 0.1 cm**2. You assumed an area of .38 cm**2 (not .49 if you work it out. I'll go with 0.1.
3) I'm calling it 7 magnitudes difference. A 6th magnitude star is still visible, so I'll add another one for good luck. Seven magnitudes difference is a 631:1 flux ratio.

2,000,000 x 0.1 / 631 = 317 photons/sec

Since the eye's sensitivity in the visual range is highly nonlinear, I'm calling this close enough.
***********

Kaptain K
15-November-2001, 10:28 AM
Oops! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_redface.gif My hypothetical eye had a square pupil. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_redface.gif
*******my 'editorial' high-lights*****


Donnie B.
15-November-2001, 10:35 AM
I don't mean to quibble, Bob, but 0.1cm^3 seems a bit small to me, considering this would be in the dark with the iris fully dilated. But it's not a biggie.

Also, I assume these numbers apply to the "night vision" portion of the retina, rather than the day-vision, high-resolution fovea. (I can never remember whether it's rods or cones that handle low-light situations). So to see the 6th-magnitude star, we're using averted vision, right?

If the above is correct, anyone know how much more light is demanded by our central vision? Obviously the brighter stars and planets are adequately bright to be seen there. What's the cutoff?

Also, how much individual variation is there? Among healthy individuals, I mean; obviously disease or defect can reduce vision to nil.

I have no particular reason to ask these questions, except curiosity -- which my local PBS station urges me to maintain... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif
******


GrapesOfWrath
15-November-2001, 12:46 PM
On 2001-11-15 05:35, Donnie B. wrote:
I don't mean to quibble, Bob, but 0.1cm^3 seems a bit small to me, considering this would be in the dark with the iris fully dilated. But it's not a biggie.

O (::kid-friendly mode on::) heck, let's quibble. 7mm is pretty much a maximum, and that gets harder to attain with age. If you assume 5mm, then the area is (.5)^2 times pi/4, which is .196 cm^2 (note "2").

Also, I assume these numbers apply to the "night vision" portion of the retina, rather than the day-vision, high-resolution fovea. (I can never remember whether it's rods or cones that handle low-light situations). So to see the 6th-magnitude star, we're using averted vision, right?

Up till now, I don't think the numbers have anything to do with rods or cones. So far, the calculations have been just how much light is actually entering the eye, not how much the receptors are excited.
*******


Donnie B.
15-November-2001, 01:06 PM
On 2001-11-15 07:46, GrapesOfWrath wrote:
Up till now, I don't think the numbers have anything to do with rods or cones. So far, the calculations have been just how much light is actually entering the eye, not how much the receptors are excited.


Sure they do. The calculations were based on the dimmest visible star being 6th magnitude. I doubt that such a dim star is visible on the fovea. Thus, the resulting photons/sec number would not apply to central vision.

By the way, it's cones for day/color/high res/central vision, rods for night/peripheral vision. I've managed to (re)learn something today... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif
*******


Bob
15-November-2001, 01:55 PM
On 2001-11-15 05:28, Kaptain K wrote:
Oops! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_redface.gif My hypothetical eye had a square pupil. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_redface.gif

Some mornings I have FELT like I had square pupils.
*********


GrapesOfWrath
15-November-2001, 01:58 PM
On 2001-11-15 08:06, Donnie B. wrote:
Sure they do. The calculations were based on the dimmest visible star being 6th magnitude. I doubt that such a dim star is visible on the fovea. Thus, the resulting photons/sec number would not apply to central vision.

Well, they still apply--but the receptors just don't respond to that number of photons, perhaps. When the original post asked about the dimmest visible stars, the usual assumption was made that the OP was talking about sixth magnitude stars--but that is a very common assumption. Once that assumption is made, the numbers don't depend upon whether we're using rods or cones.

Around here, we're sometimes lucky to see third magnitude stars. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif
*********


Donnie B.
15-November-2001, 07:32 PM
Yeah, I know what you mean... there are parts of my night sky where there are seldom any stars visible (city light pollution to my north, neighbor with bright yard light to the northeast).

Maybe I should come out with a brand of binocs or telescopes called "Fovea Helpers"... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif


there you go ...cut/paste/adjust margins/cute asterisks...legible...

I doubt that I'd make any kind of an editor.

Donnie B and all those in 'Fovea' that...stet your case now

Kaptain K
2008-Nov-19, 11:26 PM
... and exactly what does this have to do with th OP? :confused:

hhEb09'1
2008-Nov-19, 11:30 PM
:)

mahesh
2008-Nov-19, 11:46 PM
... and exactly what does this have to do with th OP? :confused:

nothing, Kap'n.

just came across it...thought the gang might like to 'chew the cud'. that's all.
like at a re-union....room full of people...horsing around ...old times.
i mean, if i'm making a racket or something, let me know. i'll turn it down.

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-20, 09:31 PM
i mean, if i'm making a racket or something, let me know. i'll turn it down.

Brother Paul again.
My two cents worth: By all means, racket on! As a "Junior Member" it amazes me to read the kind of discourse that appears to be the norm here, and I for one learn something with every post. For you to take the time to put together this "reminiscence" is, I think, impressive and shows respect and regard for the participants. In other words, "That was fun! Let's do it again!"

Piano Paul
2008-Nov-20, 09:49 PM
brother Paul signing off for a week or so; goin' to see the grandkiddies....

mahesh
2008-Nov-20, 10:14 PM
brother Paul...
Hey, that's not too many miles away, from my favourite...
Mr Sean Connery (Dr Robert Campbell) in Medicine Man! Is it?

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm353410816/tt0104839

thought you might kinda like this:

Sean Connery based his hairstyle upon that of the film's composer, Jerry Goldsmith, whom Connery was friends with. Goldsmith is even jokingly-listed in the end credits as one of Connery's hairstylists.


have fun with kiddies...

mahesh
2008-Nov-20, 10:22 PM
...and before you dash off, brother Paul...Happy Thanksgiving!

hhEb09'1
2008-Nov-21, 02:14 AM
brother Paul signing off for a week or so; goin' to see the grandkiddies....:)

You be sure and come back!
Kaptain K's earlies extant post (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/3-board-works-now.html#post102) in the first thread, post just after my own. :)

Torsten
2008-Nov-21, 08:12 AM
Kaptain K's earlies extant post (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/3-board-works-now.html#post102) in the first thread, post just after my own. :)

Hey! :)

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-01, 10:31 PM
:)

You be sure and come back!
Kaptain K's earlies extant post (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/3-board-works-now.html#post102) in the first thread, post just after my own. :)

Yes, I've often said I dye my hair clear; "New Clairol Clear! For those who don't worry about a 'bad hair day!'" Think it'll sell?
I'm back from visiting the grandkids, BTW. Thought I'd check in and see how the thread has evolved in my absence...

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-01, 10:34 PM
I'm back! What'd I miss?

Swift
2008-Dec-01, 10:45 PM
First the Earth cooled. Then the dinosaurs ruled the Earth.

Donnie B.
2008-Dec-01, 11:08 PM
First the Earth cooled. Then the dinosaurs ruled the Earth.
Then OJ Simpson took a ride in a white SUV.

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-05, 01:31 PM
Then OJ Simpson took a ride in a white SUV.

Apparently he thinks Nicole's killer is a caddie, since he insisted he was going to spend his life hunting the real murderer and has spent the last 13 years on a golf course (when he's not B&E at some hotel)

geonuc
2008-Dec-06, 07:57 PM
How's your recovery coming along, Kaptain?

Kaptain K
2008-Dec-06, 08:40 PM
How's your recovery coming along, Kaptain?

Slowly. I have improved enough that if things go as scheduled, i will move to an assisted living (nursing home on Wednesday.

chrissy
2008-Dec-06, 09:25 PM
Glad to hear your improving KK.

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-08, 09:56 PM
Slowly. I have improved enough that if things go as scheduled, i will move to an assisted living (nursing home on Wednesday.

However, I've told the Kaptain that if they don't come in with some kind of schedule/itinerary for his move that we're going to dig in our heels and MAKE them give some kind of forwarning before Kaptain K goes anywhere. So far we've heard NOTHING other than "Wednesday;" we don't know where, how, or what time, nor do we know what Kaptain K needs to do to be ready. Their lack of dispensation of information is not going to be allowed on my watch! They will tell us what we need to know, before we need to know it, so that everything is conducted smoothly and without fanfare or difficulty. (My, I'm certainly sounding proprietary, aren't I?) Piano Paul

Swift
2008-Dec-08, 10:07 PM
Their lack of dispensation of information is not going to be allowed on my watch! They will tell us what we need to know, before we need to know it, so that everything is conducted smoothly and without fanfare or difficulty. (My, I'm certainly sounding proprietary, aren't I?) Piano Paul
You haven't worked with hospital adminstration much have you? ;)

I don't recall ever getting such information, even what day, and my wife has been hospitalized multiple times. Heck, sometimes I didn't know until I came in for a visit and I'm told, "take her home".

PetersCreek
2008-Dec-08, 10:20 PM
First the Earth cooled. Then the dinosaurs ruled the Earth.

In the somewhat less brief history of time...




Steve McCroskey: Jacobs, I want to know absolutely everything that's happened up till now.
Jacobs: Well, let's see. First the earth cooled. And then the dinosaurs came, but they got too big and fat, so they all died and they turned into oil...

...and a belated feel-better-soon to the Kaptain.

Swift
2008-Dec-08, 10:47 PM
Wow! That's why you're a moderator. I always misremembered that the quote was from Airplane I and could never find it. Well, you learn something new everyday. I can go home now.

a1call
2008-Dec-09, 05:26 AM
I normally hang around the "Q&A" exclusively.
I had noticed your absent and knowing your history here was genuinely worried.

I just saw this thread for the 1st time.

Kapitain K,
It takes very small steps for things to get back to normal in no time. All you have to do is to make everyday marginally better than the last.
We are all here for you.
Good to have you back.:dance::clap::razz::D:):whistle::lol:

PetersCreek
2008-Dec-09, 07:25 AM
Wow! That's why you're a moderator. I always misremembered that the quote was from Airplane I and could never find it. Well, you learn something new everyday. I can go home now.

I take full credit...

...for typing a few keywords in the Internet Movie Database (http://www.imdb.com). :D

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-10, 03:21 PM
However, I've told the Kaptain that if they don't come in with some kind of schedule/itinerary for his move that we're going to dig in our heels and MAKE them give some kind of forwarning before Kaptain K goes anywhere. So far we've heard NOTHING other than "Wednesday;" we don't know where, how, or what time, nor do we know what Kaptain K needs to do to be ready. Their lack of dispensation of information is not going to be allowed on my watch! They will tell us what we need to know, before we need to know it, so that everything is conducted smoothly and without fanfare or difficulty. (My, I'm certainly sounding proprietary, aren't I?) Piano Paul

We've learned that Kaptain K is moving to Elgin Nursing And Rehabilitation Center today (Wednesday December 10th) at 12:30, so at least we have that much information. From there it's going to be day-to-day, with hopefully enough advance notice of going home that we can get his house ready for rehabitation (electricity is off and the house needs a little modification for someone not quite as mobile as before). As Jerry Garcia said, "... What a long, strange trip it's been!"
Piano Paul

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-11, 01:52 PM
We've learned that Kaptain K is moving to Elgin Nursing And Rehabilitation Center today (Wednesday December 10th) at 12:30 p.m.
Piano Paul

The Kaptain is in Elgin Nursing and Rehab; my God what an ordeal. It took over three hours to fill out the admissions paperwork! Also, Elgin has no WiFi, so we're going to have to get a phone line activated (and he wants his home computer) so he can log back on. You may not hear from Kaptain K again this week, but rest assured he's fine. We'll get him hooked up as soon as we can. Piano Paul

Swift
2008-Dec-11, 02:13 PM
Thanks Piano Paul for the update. Give the Kaptain our best. And tell him to stay away from Britney and Lindsey Lohan during his rehab. ;)

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-18, 04:22 PM
Thanks Piano Paul for the update. Give the Kaptain our best. And tell him to stay away from Britney and Lindsey Lohan during his rehab. ;)

Kaptain K has a couple of cuties working with him on PT and occupational therapy, but mostl of the workers are nursing home drones who treat the residents like furniture; not badly, just indifferently.
We're still waiting for that fine company AT&T to hook up his computer so he can be back on BAUT. They were supposed to do it Wednesday, but of course they no-showed. Kaptain K will be back online as soon as they hook him up. He does have his home phone number now, so that's at least something.

Tinaa
2008-Dec-19, 02:07 AM
Tell him we're thinking of him!

mike alexander
2008-Dec-19, 06:16 AM
Tell him what we're thinking of AT&T!

sarongsong
2008-Dec-19, 06:54 AM
...We're still waiting for...AT&T to hook up his computer so he can be back on BAUT...Depending on the hook-up, you might want to find out if the connection remains valid if The Kaptain moves to a different room. :)

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-22, 03:51 PM
Depending on the hook-up, you might want to find out if the connection remains valid if The Kaptain moves to a different room. :)

Still haven't gotten an AT&T tech to hook up his computer; I may have to figure it out myself. He has phone (his original number; they just set it up for his current residence) so there is a jack to plug into. I'll probably have to get an extension and run it across the ceiling, since he needs clear floor space for his chair and walker. He is continuing with his PT and OT, but it's been very hard, as his physical condition seems to have plateau-ed (no matter how I type that it doesn't look right, but you know what I mean). I know that if he can get hooked up to the internet it'll help his disposition immensely, so wish me luck in getting him connected. Hopefully the next message about Kaptain K will come from the Kaptain himself. TIll then, and unless I chime in again, Merry Christmas to all, and to all, Happy Holidays! Piano Paul

Piano Paul
2008-Dec-29, 02:04 PM
The Kaptain appears to be losing ground in the nursing home; he's gone from being able to walk around 70 feet to being barely able to stand up. He has a lesion on his spinal cord (medspeak for "we don't know what it is") which appears to be compromising nerve signals to his legs. A robust dose of steroids knocked it back for a while, but the treatment has to be discontinued gradually (Steroids AREN'T forever) and as the dosage reduces so does his legs' usefulness. He is weak, tired and of course bummed by this turn of events. He also has a chest congestion that he can't seem to shake, so it may be that a doctor's visit or even a return to a hospital may be in his future before too long. He really is trying, but it's obviously frustrating when your body won't do what you tell it to. I'll keep y'all posted as more news develops.

Tinaa
2008-Dec-29, 02:48 PM
Thank you Paul. Let him know we are thinking of him.

hhEb09'1
2008-Dec-29, 02:54 PM
Thank you Paul. Let him know we are thinking of him."

mahesh
2008-Dec-29, 07:21 PM
Hope K K gets better soon. Our thoughts are with you both and family.

Swift
2008-Dec-30, 06:02 AM
Thanks Paul for the update. Please give the Kaptain our best. I hope this is only a small step back, and will be followed by many steps forward.

Moose
2008-Dec-30, 04:31 PM
Thanks for letting us know, Paul. Best wishes to the Kaptain.

mahesh
2008-Dec-31, 04:08 PM
Best wishes and warmest regards from us to you Kap K and to you Paul!

A Very Happy New Year! Spring in your steps and Joy in your hearts!

Van Rijn
2009-Jan-02, 09:54 AM
Paul, please let the Kaptain know that we'll be waiting for him to get over this setback and hope to see him posting again.

Piano Paul
2009-Jan-06, 01:21 PM
Thanks for all the kind words. The Kaptain is waiting for a doctor's appointment to be scheduled so his condition can be diagnosed; his PT and OT state that what is going on is clearly medical and not rehabilitational (meaning he's trying but his body isn't responding). He needs a better diagnosis and treatment than "lesion and steroids" or else he may be consigned to a bed for life, which is no life at all. I'll pass on your good thoughts and wishes, and keep you updated when we learn more.

Piano Paul
2009-Jan-14, 04:44 PM
Kaptain K is back in the hospital; he had reached the point at the nursing home where he was, in insurance company terms, "custodial care," meaning 100% disabled. His legs barely function at all, and he had an MRI yesterday to look at his spinal cord again. This time the doctor referred to "lesions"(plural) but they haven't come up with a course of treatment yet. I'm going to bring the Kaptain's laptop to him tomorrow so he can log on himself (the hospital has WIFI, which the nursing home does not) and get in touch with y'all. In the meantime, keep those good thoughts coming his way. He's needing support right now. Thanks!

Moose
2009-Jan-14, 04:49 PM
Oof, yeah, lots of good thoughts for the Kaptain from over here, Paul.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Jan-14, 04:51 PM
My thoughts are with you Kaptain.

Swift
2009-Jan-14, 05:42 PM
Thanks for the update Paul. Please give the Kaptain our best.

mahesh
2009-Jan-14, 06:26 PM
Thanks for updates Paul. We are rootin' for Kapn's good health. Warmest regards to you all.

Donnie B.
2009-Jan-15, 02:30 AM
I'm very sorry to hear that the laptop will be needed again. I hope things take a turn for the better soon.

Torsten
2009-Jan-15, 06:28 AM
Thanks for the update Paul. All the best to you Karl.

Piano Paul
2009-Jan-15, 01:52 PM
Kaptain K's attending physician described Karl's condition as "demyelination," where the myelin sheath around the spinal cord has been damaged somehow. I looked up the term and this is what I found. Underlines are mine and indicate symptoms/conditions/treatments that apply to Kaptain K. It is this layman's opinion that the Kaptain's condition is identified by the description listed below:

Transverse myelitis
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Transverse myelitis is a neurological disorder caused by an inflammatory process of the grey and white matter of the spinal cord, and can cause axonal demyelination.
Presentation
This demyelination arises idiopathically following infections or vaccination, or due to multiple sclerosis. One major theory of the cause is that an immune-mediated inflammation is present as the result of exposure to a viral antigen. (Kaptain K had a fever of 106.6º)
The lesions are inflammatory, and involve the spinal cord on both sides. With acute transverse myelitis, the onset is sudden and progresses rapidly in hours and days. The lesions can be present anywhere in the spinal cord, though it is usually restricted to only a small portion.
Causes
In some cases, the disease is presumed to be caused by viral infections or vaccinations and has also been associated with spinal cord injuries, immune reactions, schistosomiasis and insufficient blood flow through spinal cord vessels. Acute myelitis accounts for 4 to 5 percent of all cases of neuroborreliosis.[1] Symptoms include weakness and numbness of the limbs as well as motor, sensory, and sphincter deficits. Severe backpain may occur in some patients at the onset of the disease. Treatment is usually symptomatic only, corticosteroids being used with limited success. A major differentiation or distinction to be made is a similar condition due to compression of the spinal cord in the spinal canal, due to disease of the surrounding vertebral column.
Prognosis
Prognosis for complete recovery is generally poor. Recovery from transverse myelitis usually begins between weeks 2 and 12 following onset and may continue for up to 2 years in some patients, many of whom are left with considerable disabilities. Some patients show no signs of recovery whatsoever.[2]However, if treated early, some patients experience complete or near complete recovery.
Symptoms and signs
The symptoms and signs depend upon the level of the spinal cord involved and the extent of the involvement of the various long tracts. In some cases, there is almost total paralysis and sensory loss below the level of the lesion. In other cases, such loss is only partial.
• If the high cervical area is involved, all four limbs may be involved and there is risk of respiratory paralysis (segments C3,4,5 to diaphragm).
• Lesions of the lower cervical (C2-T1) region will cause a combination of upper and lower motor neuron signs in the upper limbs, and exclusively upper motor neuron signs in the lower limbs.
• A lesion of the thoracic spinal cord (T1-12) will produce a spastic paraplegia.
• A lesion of the lower part of the spinal cord (L1-S5) often produces a combination of upper and lower motor neuron signs in the lower limbs.
The degree and type of sensory loss will depend upon the extent of the involvement of the various sensory tracts, but there is often a "sensory level" (at the sensory segmental level of the spinal cord below which sensation to pin or light touch is impaired). This has proven to be a reasonably reliable sign of the level of the lesion. Bladder paralysis often occurs and urinary retention is an early manifestation. Considerable pain often occurs in the back, extending laterally to involve the sensory distribution of the diseased spinal segments—so-called "radicular pain." Thus, a lesion at the T8 level will produce pain radiating from the spine laterally along the lower costal margins. These signs and symptoms may progress to severe weakness within hours. (Because of the acuteness of this lesion, signs of spinal shock may be evident, in which the lower limbs will be flaccid and areflexic, rather than spastic and hyperreflexic as they should be in upper motor neuron paralysis.
However, within several days, this spinal shock will disappear and signs of spasticity will become evident.
Differential diagnosis
The three main conditions to be considered in the differential diagnosis are: acute spinal cord trauma, acute compressive lesions of the spinal cord such as epidural metastatic tumour, and infarction of the spinal cord, usually due to insufficiency of the anterior spinal artery. Lyme disease serology is indicated in patients with transverse myelitis keeping in mind that dissociation in Lyme antibody titers between the blood and the CSF is possible. (Lyme disease has been mentioned several times as a possible agent in the Kaptain's case...)From the symptoms and signs, it may be very difficult to distinguish acute transverse myelitis from these conditions and it is almost invariably necessary to perform an emergency magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or computerised tomographic (CT) myelogram. Before doing this, routine x-rays are taken of the entire spine, mainly to detect signs of metastatic disease of the vertebrae, that would imply direct extension into the epidural space and compression of the spinal cord. Often, such bony lesions are absent and it is only the MRI or CT that discloses the presence or absence of a compressive lesion.
A family physician seeing such a patient for the first time should immediately arrange transfer to the care of a neurologist or neurosurgeon who can urgently investigate the patient in hospital. Before arranging this transfer, the physician should be certain that respiration is not affected, particularly in high spinal cord lesions. If there is any evidence of this, methods of respiratory assistance must be on hand before and during the transfer procedure. The patient should also be catheterized to test for and, if necessary, drain an over-distended bladder. A lumbar puncture can be performed after the MRI or at the time of CT myelography. Steroids are often given in high dose at the onset, in hope that the degree of inflammation and swelling of the cord will be lessened, but whether this is truly effective is still debated.
Unfortunately, the prognosis for significant recovery from acute transverse myelitis is poor in approximately 80% of the cases; that is, significant long-term disabilities will remain. Approximately 5% of these patients will, in later months or years, show lesions in other parts of the central nervous system, indicating, in retrospect, that this was a first attack of multiple sclerosis. [4]

I am convinced that this condition is what has happened with Kaptain K. Any opinions/observations/suggestions are welcome. Piano Paul

geonuc
2009-Jan-15, 01:58 PM
Doesn't sound good. :(

I hope he's as comfortable as possible.

sarongsong
2009-Jan-22, 05:12 AM
...Lyme disease has been mentioned several times as a possible agent in the Kaptain's case...Thanks, Paul; here is a recent local find on the Lyme front:
December 3, 2008
Researchers identify cell group key to Lyme disease arthritis
..."So in those individuals who have a more severe form of the disease, you can study their NK (natural killer) T cells and see if there's some deficiency that prevents those NK T cells from killing and clearing the bacteria."...
EurekAlert (http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-12/ljif-ric120308.php)Highest regards to the Kaptain :)

Piano Paul
2009-Feb-11, 01:52 PM
Remarkably enough Kaptain K is progressing again. While the diagnosis of transverse myelitis has since been confirmed by the attending physician and the neurologist, therapy is apparently working. Yesterday (February 10th) the Kaptain was able to walk with the aid of a walker. This is a quantum leap forward from being bedridden. Also, his attitude is much improved (funny how hope will do that to you). Without becoming inappropriately optimistic, I can nevertheless say that the prognosis is looking better than it has for the last five plus months. Right now the Kaptain is in hospital rehab, with no scheduled release date. I will post again if things change dramatically. Piano Paul

geonuc
2009-Feb-11, 02:05 PM
Cool.

Moose
2009-Feb-11, 03:39 PM
Well that's great to hear. :)

Swift
2009-Feb-11, 03:59 PM
Thanks for keeping us in the loop Paul. And, as always, please let the Kaptain know that we all wish the best for him.

mike alexander
2009-Feb-11, 04:06 PM
My wife had a severe case of Lyme Disease about twenty years ago, with total paralysis that stopped just short of needing a respirator. It took a couple of years for the peripheral neuropathy to completely resolve itself, and truth to tell she'll admit that she's never really made it back 100%. But she accepts 90-95%, and so I will hope for the Kaptain.

Tinaa
2009-Feb-12, 12:41 AM
Give him my best Paul!

mahesh
2009-Feb-12, 01:53 AM
quote:....the prognosis is looking better....

thanks Paul...sending our best to you all.

Piano Paul
2009-Feb-20, 01:20 PM
I told everyone that Kaptain K has a confirmed diagnosis of transverse myelitis, a condition that is similar to multiple sclerosis and/or polio (the full name for polio is "poliomyelitis…") If you check my earlier post you can see the description and prognosis for the condition, so I won't bother to repeat it here.
The bottom line is, two weeks ago Kaptain K could not get out of bed or into/out of a wheelchair without extensive help (two people lifting him). In the last two weeks he has gone from practically immobile to getting himself out of bed and into a wheelchair, and back, unaided (using a walker for balance) and has progressed to the point where he has walked as far as 178 feet with a walker, and 15 feet without one. These advances are absolutely off the chart in terms of quantum leaps forward; two weeks ago the therapists were talking about possibly sending Kaptain K back to the nursing home for continued rehab and long-term care; today they're discussing the very real possibility that Kaptain K may go home, and be able to live independently. I have no idea what the reason for the turnaround may be, nor does Kaptain K, but as a friend of mine told me years ago, the one thing we're not going to do is "look at the mouth on that gift horse!"
Keep those thoughts and prayers coming; if it turns out that Kaptain K is able to go home we have a whole new set of challenges to confront, but they're the kind of projects we don't mind facing (modifying his home and setting it up for wheelchair access, learning to cook while sitting down, etc.). I'll let y'all know more as we find out.

Piano Paul

geonuc
2009-Feb-20, 01:23 PM
I noticed KK online a few days ago. Nice to see.

Swift
2009-Feb-20, 03:48 PM
In the last two weeks he has gone from practically immobile to getting himself out of bed and into a wheelchair, and back, unaided (using a walker for balance) and has progressed to the point where he has walked as far as 178 feet with a walker, and 15 feet without one. These advances are absolutely off the chart in terms of quantum leaps forward; two weeks ago the therapists were talking about possibly sending Kaptain K back to the nursing home for continued rehab and long-term care; today they're discussing the very real possibility that Kaptain K may go home, and be able to live independently.
http://www.websmileys.com/sm/cool/653.gif

Great news Paul. Can't keep a good Kaptain down. Let's hope he has the strength to post to this zoo soon!

Fazor
2009-Feb-20, 03:54 PM
To show how scattered my mind is today; I thought Swift's last post said "Let's hope he has the strength to be put in the zoo soon!"

I thought that was an odd comment. Now I realize I'm just illiterate. :doh:
Here's to a quick recovery, Kap'n.

Torsten
2009-Feb-20, 04:20 PM
Oh wow that is good to hear.

Thanks for the update Paul. I'm looking forward to reading posts by Kaptain K again.

Swift
2009-Feb-20, 04:44 PM
To show how scattered my mind is today; I thought Swift's last post said "Let's hope he has the strength to be put in the zoo soon!"

I thought that was an odd comment. Now I realize I'm just illiterate. :doh:

ROFL :lol:

You, on the other hand, we have a special place for, with some nice simple books to color. ;)

Fazor
2009-Feb-20, 04:58 PM
... with some nice simple books to color. ;)

Carefull, I go into a frenzie when I can't stay inside the lines ... which is always. Make sure to remove all sharp, heavy, or otherwise weaponizable objects from the room.

Donnie B.
2009-Feb-20, 09:40 PM
Fantastic news, Paul. I'm sure this forum is the least of his concerns right now, but please let him know we're all pulling for him.

BigDon
2009-Feb-20, 10:19 PM
I was just thinking about the good Kaptain yesterday and wondering how he was doing. Thank you Paul.

Van Rijn
2009-Feb-20, 10:26 PM
These advances are absolutely off the chart in terms of quantum leaps forward; two weeks ago the therapists were talking about possibly sending Kaptain K back to the nursing home for continued rehab and long-term care; today they're discussing the very real possibility that Kaptain K may go home, and be able to live independently.


That post made me smile (it was great to hear).

Tinaa
2009-Feb-21, 12:42 AM
Woo Hoo!

hhEb09'1
2009-Feb-22, 04:16 PM
Thanks Paul, welcome back Kaptain.

beskeptical
2009-Feb-22, 10:40 PM
My wife had a severe case of Lyme Disease about twenty years ago, with total paralysis that stopped just short of needing a respirator. It took a couple of years for the peripheral neuropathy to completely resolve itself, and truth to tell she'll admit that she's never really made it back 100%. But she accepts 90-95%, and so I will hope for the Kaptain.Are you sure that wasn't GBS (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/gbs/gbs.htm)? It doesn't sound like Lyme disease. Or was the Lyme disease suspected as causing the GBS?

Transverse Myelitis (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/transversemyelitis/detail_transversemyelitis.htm) is awful. It attacks out of the blue, one day you are healthy the next you are paralyzed. But about a 1/3 of the people with it recover quite well. The fact recovery has started is an excellent sign.

Al Unser Jr's daughter had TM and they claimed hep B vaccine caused it. There is no evidence the vaccine causes TM and it's but one of the many false claims made by anti-vaxers.


Hi Kaptain. :D

Piano Paul
2009-Feb-26, 02:50 PM
Kaptain K is going to go home for about an hour this weekend on what is called a "trial visit home." This is to determine whether he is physically able and psychologically ready to assume the challenges of independent living with reduced capability. He's not fully recovered but has come far enough that this is a feasible idea. The Kaptain is naturally trepidatious but also very excited, as am I. I will post the results of this experiment next week sometime.
Thanks again to everyone for your support. The Kaptain, I am sure, has recovered in no small part due to his online family at BAUT!

Swift
2009-Feb-26, 04:00 PM
Great news Paul

sarongsong
2009-Feb-26, 05:44 PM
Yippy-yi-yaaa! :clap:
How's the Kaptain's appetite?

mike alexander
2009-Feb-26, 06:30 PM
Are you sure that wasn't GBS (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/gbs/gbs.htm)? It doesn't sound like Lyme disease. Or was the Lyme disease suspected as causing the GBS?

Transverse Myelitis (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/transversemyelitis/detail_transversemyelitis.htm) is awful. It attacks out of the blue, one day you are healthy the next you are paralyzed. But about a 1/3 of the people with it recover quite well. The fact recovery has started is an excellent sign.

Al Unser Jr's daughter had TM and they claimed hep B vaccine caused it. There is no evidence the vaccine causes TM and it's but one of the many false claims made by anti-vaxers.


Hi Kaptain. :D

It was definitely Guilame-Barre Syndrome, but it was precipitated by confirmed Lyme disease, as you suspected. A month of nasty antibiotic therapy knocked out the Lyme, then it was just a loooong period of therapy and recovery.

And my best wishes added for the Kaptain.

mahesh
2009-Feb-26, 09:19 PM
I am so sorry.

It is awful, when such events happen in our lives. One's loved ones / dear ones suffer and change all lives for ever!

On the positive note, on the sunny side, their recoveries, whatever the degrees ./ percentages, are blessings. I am sorry Mike, and all others who have undergone such situations, for themselves and their families.

As Mr Paul Klemme says, about 'not looking at the gift horse', mouth-wise.

My warmest regards to all and Kap'n K and family!

01101001
2009-Feb-27, 03:55 AM
Yay, K!

Piano Paul
2009-Mar-02, 03:53 PM
Yippy-yi-yaaa! :clap:
How's the Kaptain's appetite?

No problem there; the Kaptain has lost weight (who wouldn't?) but he started at around 275, dropped to 209 and is now around 228, which is probably a good weight for him. He's been heavy his whole life (sometimes REALLY heavy) so 228-240 would be beneficial for his blood pressure as well as for his diabetes, as long as he continues to eat food that's good for him. Yesterday we went out to eat (Chinese buffet) and he was pretty moderate in his portions. Probably too much meat and not enough veggies, but hey, it's a buffet and ya wanna get yore money's worth, right?
We took him for a trial visit home but couldn't get him in the house; no ramp and the stairs were too steep for a wheelchair and too tall for him to step up, so now we know what we need to do to get him inside. I have calls out to various people/agencies for assistance on ramp-building and making dwellings accessible to the disabled. We'll see how that goes.
On the health front Kaptain K is looking and feeling well. He fell the other day and jammed his back so now that hurts, but no real damage was done (WHEW).
More as we learn. Piano Paul

Donnie B.
2009-Mar-02, 04:49 PM
You should find out if any state of Federal agencies offer financial assistance for the cost of accessibility conversions. His insurance company is another possible source of aid -- it's much cheaper than institutionalization.

beskeptical
2009-Mar-07, 08:59 AM
This is an unusual condition related to myelin diseases that I thought was interesting.

PROGRESSIVE INFLAMMATORY NEUROPATHY, PORK PLANT WORKERS - USA: 2007-2008 (http://www.promedmail.org/pls/otn/f?p=2400:1001:3769457701739005::NO::F2400_P1001_BA CK_PAGE,F2400_P1001_PUB_MAIL_ID:1000,76471)
Workers at pork processing plants who developed a rare neurological disorder 2 years ago [2007] after being exposed to [organic] mist while removing brains from pigs have improved but still display symptoms, according to a study by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (MN).

The workers at "heads tables" at Quality Pork Processors in Austin, MN, and at another plant in Indiana had used compressed air to extract pig brains and developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, which attacks nerves and produces numbness, tingling and weakness in arms and legs...

..The Mayo study found that 16 of 17 of the workers who were treated with immune therapies such as steroids improved with the treatment, 12 markedly so, according to a report that has been prepared for a neurology meeting next month [April 2009]; 6 workers who had no treatment also improved after they were no longer exposed to the pig brain mist, according to the report.

[Although the exact antigenic stimulus is not clear, the pathophysiology appears to be exposure to a neural antigen such as myelin via inhalation of the "pig brain mist". - Mod.LL]


This was reported a few years ago. At first I thought they were going to find a new virus one got from inhaling the pig brain mist. Now it looks like an autoimmune type of reaction.

They quit using the process when this showed up, BTW, if anyone was curious. Does make you wonder however, about these news food processing techniques.

Piano Paul
2009-Mar-12, 05:14 PM
This was reported a few years ago. At first I thought they were going to find a new virus one got from inhaling the pig brain mist. Now it looks like an autoimmune type of reaction.

They quit using the process when this showed up, BTW, if anyone was curious. Does make you wonder however, about these news food processing techniques.


Interesting. Shows how much we DON'T know about how organic chemistry works...
Kaptain K went home for two days and is back in the hospital. He fell twice while at home and it has been determined that it is not safe for him to live alone (duh). He will probably be returned to the Rehabilitation Center in Elgin in the next day or so. Disappointing indeed that he is unable to go home again, but he will be safer and more secure in a facility that can monitor his condition and keep him from danger. His condition seems to have plateau-ed; he can walk with the aid of a walker, but not very well and not consistently (or safely, obviously). We don't know what the long term prognosis will be, but for the forseeable future it's going to be nursing home care for the Kaptain. He is more okay with this than he is with the prospect of being at home without a safety net. As soon as he is moved and online I'm confident he will log on and tell everyone about his "long, strange trip." In the meantime, thanks again for everyone's support. Piano Paul

Donnie B.
2009-Mar-12, 09:05 PM
Well. Not the result we'd all hoped for, but it sounds like his quality of life will be tolerable. Send along our best wishes and that we're looking forward to having him back among us soon.

Piano Paul
2009-Mar-16, 12:19 PM
Kaptain K is back in Elgin at the Nursing and Rehab Center, and he's working on getting his phone and internet hooked up again. I'm working on getting his disability applications filed, and right now everything is pretty much status quo. The Kaptain will continue to work in rehab, at the very least maintaining the progress he has made so far, but there's no telling how much improvement is left to be accomplished. As soon as he is online he will fill everyone in on his perspective of the last six months. I'll be lurking around too.

Piano Paul
2009-Apr-01, 12:43 PM
Kaptain K is back online, so be looking for his posts!

hhEb09'1
2009-Apr-01, 01:04 PM
Kaptain K is back online, so be looking for his posts!
:)

Swift
2009-Apr-01, 01:08 PM
http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/musik/k015.gif
Well, tell him to get his butt in here already! ;)

Kaptain K
2009-Apr-01, 07:30 PM
Yeah, I'm back online (hopefully for good). More news later!

mike alexander
2009-Apr-01, 07:35 PM
In this case, any news is good news, Kaptain.

So happy to hear from you.

Swift
2009-Apr-01, 08:13 PM
Yeah, I'm back online (hopefully for good). More news later!
Nice to see back here Kaptain. :D

Tinaa
2009-Apr-02, 12:09 AM
Hi Kapt. glad your are back.

Piano Paul
2009-Apr-22, 05:33 PM
ALERT! ALERT! Kaptain K is having a party!
We're celebrating the Kaptain's 60th birthday Saturday afternoon, May 23rd 2009. If you would like information as to location and specific times send me a message via this BB. There'll be live music and probably something to snack on, and it'll be early afternoon at the latest so no one will miss any sky-watching. Hope to hear from some of you soon! Piano Paul