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interstellaryeller
2008-Nov-14, 05:45 PM
It was the finest era of modern rocketry the Apollo craft with its five massive J-1 engines was without a doubt a true beast. The engine itself produced more power that every river in North America combined. All we have left are movies of this fine era. Which dont due justice to the chest rattling thunder it produced during launch. My hat goes off to the people that worked on Apollo. It was the most complex machine of its time. However I would have enjoyed watching a Apollo - Nova launch. And a special congradulations for It was the finest era of modern rocketry the Apollo craft with its five massive J-1 engines was without a doubt a true beast. The engine itself produced more power that every river in North America combined. All we have left are movies of this fine era. Which dont due justice to the chest rattling thunder it produced during launch. My hat goes off to the people that worked on Apollo. It was the most complex machine of its time. However I would have enjoyed watching a Apollo - Nova launch. And a special congradulations for Gene Kranz. He didnt ask what the "Aquarius" module was designed to do, he asked what can it do. What a life boat, and that was truly nasa's finest hour.

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-14, 05:52 PM
I'm sure most people here would agree.
I'm curious to know if there something you have experienced lately that compelled you to comment on this?

One minor nitpick though. The rocket was a Saturn V. Apollo was the program, and is often used to describe the hardware that sits on top of the rocket.

By the way, you seem to be repeating yourself... Bounce one too many times on that paste button?

Nicolas
2008-Nov-14, 06:27 PM
I do not agree. It were 5 F-1 engines in the first stage, not J-1 :).

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-14, 06:39 PM
I do not agree. It were 5 F-1 engines in the first stage, not J-1 :).

Did he say first stage? He might have meant second stage...;):lol:

And lets throw in another for the third stage and one for the S1B for good luck. :whistle:

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-14, 08:23 PM
Minor nitpicks aside, I fully agree. When I was taking the bus to Space Academy from the Huntsville airport, I saw the Space Center's Davidson Center building (http://www.hab1.com/index_files/photos_from_the_new_davidson_saturn_v_center.html) and thought "Man, that's a really long building." Then, as we got closer, I realized "There's something in there! And it's huge!" And then, after a few more seconds "It's a bloody rocket!"

Because that is just how big a Saturn V is.

nauthiz
2008-Nov-14, 08:43 PM
When I visited Kennedy a couple years back, I was stunned speechless by the sight of that mounted Saturn-V. It's hard to realize what an impressive vehicle it is until you've seen it yourself.

Gemini
2008-Nov-15, 03:41 AM
Minor nitpicks aside, I fully agree. When I was taking the bus to Space Academy from the Huntsville airport, I saw the Space Center's Davidson Center building (http://www.hab1.com/index_files/photos_from_the_new_davidson_saturn_v_center.html) and thought "Man, that's a really long building." Then, as we got closer, I realized "There's something in there! And it's huge!" And then, after a few more seconds "It's a bloody rocket!"

Because that is just how big a Saturn V is.

That, folks, is one of the reasons I love living where I do.

ToSeek
2008-Nov-15, 03:52 AM
Did he say first stage? He might have meant second stage...;):lol:



Then he should have said J-2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J-2_(rocket_engine)), not J-1. ;)

matthewota
2008-Nov-15, 10:47 AM
I saw it...1969. It was Mankind's Greatest Adventure. It was America's Proudest Achievement. It ignited the imaginations and passions of millions.

We have been going around in circles since. It is time for us to go back into deep space.

I want to see a person on Mars before I die.

Nicolas
2008-Nov-15, 11:43 AM
It ignited the imaginations and passions of millions.

And the yearly energy consumption of millions as well ;)

Nadme
2008-Nov-15, 12:44 PM
I saw it...1969. It was Mankind's Greatest Adventure. It was America's Proudest Achievement. It ignited the imaginations and passions of millions.

We have been going around in circles since. It is time for us to go back into deep space.

I want to see a person on Mars before I die.

You've said perfectly and exactly my same sentiments. :)

I'd just turned 4 during Apollo 11 and do have 3 or 4 snippets of memory about it. The majestic Saturn V was overwhelming, the astronauts were god-like. I also have memories of Apollo 13 (scary -- especially for a little child), etc.

A truly magnificent era. I'm grateful to have actual memories of the time, what few and brief they are.

p.s.: I have seen the Saturn V at JSC, in 1983. I also own a DVD collection of every Saturn V launch. Wow, could that marvelous beastie ROAR. :D

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-15, 02:35 PM
The next thing I saw as the bus pulled in was the Pathfinder full stack (http://static.zooomr.com/images/660495_bd90c27203.jpg), and I thought "I promised myself I wouldn't drool."
As I got a closer look at Pathfinder, (Not as close a look as I would have liked, as it was undergoing maintenance.) I was further amazed. SRBs look so small on TV, you'd never think you could stand up inside them!

And then, we actually went to the Davidson Center and stepped out under the F-1 engines.
"I want to say: 'those engines are big', but it's more like- 'the definition of big is those engines'."
The shuttle is impressive, but it's familiar. The Saturn V, on the other hand, seemed a thing of epic legends even as it hung over my head.

Nicolas
2008-Nov-15, 09:21 PM
For years I've wanted to make a display of a rocket engine that fell somewhere in a field, I'd make the rocket engine (bell) from the top of a soda bottle with loads of added details and paint, the grass and soil from the right scale model components, and add a Micromachines figure (not a car, a human) or perhaps scale model 1/72 person to give the idea of some unknown HUUUUUUUUUUUUUGE rocket engine that would dwarf the F-1. Never got around to doing it though...

Alternative for a fallen rocket engine in a field would be a rocket engine on display somewhere, I don't know what would be the nicest...

mugaliens
2008-Nov-16, 06:54 PM
I've always been under the impression that Apollo's finest hour was when Neil Armstrong set foot on the Moon. After all, wasn't that the mission statement?

I'm surprised he didn't just say, "Houston, mission complete."

Nicolas
2008-Nov-16, 07:49 PM
He wanted people to stay on their desk until he was back on terra firma. Smart guy. :)

(and the official mission statement also was to get a man on the moon and return him safely)

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-16, 10:55 PM
He wanted people to stay on their desk until he was back on terra firma. Smart guy. :)

(and the official mission statement also was to get a man on the moon and return him safely)

Yes, remember the scene from Apollo 13?

*Engineers cheer*

"Save it for splashdown, boys."

Salty
2008-Nov-18, 02:15 PM
One of my few claims to fame, is, I was in on the recovery of Apollo 17.

The parachutes opened up, and I could see a dot. As it came down, the view improved, and I could see four dots. Then it continued down, and I could see the capsule and the three 'chutes.

There was some trouble, for the UDT men to reach the capsule, an unexpected current. After maybe ten or fifteen minutes, they got the astronauts out of the capsule, and brought them to the USS Ticonderoga, on their Zodiac boats.

Later that night, I returned to the flight deck. All was quiet and the ocean calm. I walked aft of the island, and there it was, the Apollo 17 capsule. it was scorched from reentry, and big as life. I touched it. It was real.

No one will ever convince me, that they were'nt in space. Since they were in space, I'm sure they were on the moon. We didn't cruise slowly, to be in position to recover them, whereever they may have aborted on the way to the moon, for a hoax. From the time after their launch that they reached space, to the splash down, we were where they would come down if they had to abort on the way. I hope I said that right. There was no hoax; no government spends that much money and uses that much manpower (5,000 aboard on splashdown day), to pull a hoax.

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-18, 11:42 PM
You are so lucky, Salty. I wish I could have been there.

Salty
2008-Nov-19, 10:21 AM
You are so lucky, Salty. I wish I could have been there.

It really was luck. I had just joined the USNR, and saw the request for volunteers. It was a 46 day cruise, and fit perfectly for my need to catch up some payments.

It's one of the few highlights of my life.

Another space program highlight came during my prior tour in the USMC. I was in a training command. They had brought us instructors upstairs, to sit in on the student briefing.
We were sitting along the back wall. There were Lieutenants to bird colonels in the class. A Lt. Col. walked in...a short sandy haired man. The class's instructor took one look, and brought the whole class to "Attention!".

We stood. The class instructor introduced us to Lt. Col. John Glenn. He told us, "Carry on."
He then came to the back of the room, and sat in a chair directly in front of me.

I endured waves of internalized hero worship, the remainder of the class.

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-19, 10:32 PM
You are officially the most awesome person I've talked to all week.

Nicolas
2008-Nov-19, 10:45 PM
Pfffffft, I've been on 3 ships in one day today. OK, none of them featured an Apollo capsule.

Seriously, that sounds sooooooo cool Salty. I go on dredge vessels. We've got mud on the rear deck. Wheee... BOOHOO I want an Apollo capsule on our vessels too, that would make the job a tad bit more interesting indeed.

Swift
2008-Nov-19, 11:23 PM
Very cool stories Salty. I met Senator Glenn a couple of times while he was Senator from Ohio (at a speech once, handshake at some political event another time). I know what you mean about that hero worship moment.

Please, please, next time we have some hard core Moon Landing Hoax believer, please bring up the point that you (a government / military employee!!!) actually witnessed the splashdown and actually touched the capsule. Let them explain that away as special effects.

Gemini
2008-Nov-19, 11:25 PM
You are officially the most awesome person I've talked to all week.
Seconded

Salty
2008-Nov-20, 04:40 AM
Kai, blush. Thank you.

Nicolas, the only surviving Apollo capsule I know of, is in the Smithsonian museum. Don't waste your time contacting them, they won't let you have it. grin.

Swift, one of these days, I might bounce over to Conspiracy threads and do that.

Gemini, blush deepens. Many thanks.

Graybeard6
2008-Nov-20, 06:01 AM
The Apollo Command Module Capsules are on display at various sites throughout the U.S. and the world.

Apollo 7
Command Module
National Museum of Science and Technology, Ottawa, Canada

Apollo 8
Command Module
Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, Illinois

Apollo 9
Command Module "Gumdrop"
Michigan Space and Science Center, Jackson, Michigan

Apollo 10
Command Module "Charlie Brown"
Science Museum, London, England

Apollo 11
Command Module "Columbia"
The National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C.

Apollo 12
Command Module "Yankee Clipper"
Virginia Air and Space Center, Hampton, Virginia

Apollo 13
Command Module "Odyssey"
Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center, Hutchinson, Kansas

Apollo 14
Command Module "Kitty Hawk"
Astronaut Hall of Fame, Titusville, Florida

Apollo 15
Command Module "Endeavor"
USAF Museum, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio

Apollo 16
Command Module "Casper"
U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama
Lunar Module "Orion"

Apollo 17
Command Module "America"
NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas

Apollo-Soyuz
Command Module
NASA Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida

Test Command Module
Museum of Flight, Seattle, Washington

Skylab 2 / Crew 1
Command Module
Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida

Skylab 3 / Crew 2
Command Module
NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Skylab 4 / Crew 3
Command Module
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C.

I've seen the ones in the Smithsonion, Huntsville, Seattle, Wright-Patterson and Pensacola.

Nicolas
2008-Nov-20, 08:35 AM
I'll mail them all. Sure they can miss one of them? I'll put them on one of our finest vessels. ;) :D

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-21, 12:28 AM
I've seen Columbia and Casper, but I'd really like to visit them all. Maybe a good quest one of my college summers.

Gemini
2008-Nov-21, 10:47 PM
I've seen Casper, Skylab, and I'll see Apollo 8 when I'm Chicago next week.