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Fraser
2008-Nov-19, 10:50 PM
Scientists have discovered an unidentified source of high-energy cosmic rays bombarding Earth from space. They say it must be close to the solar system and it could be made of dark matter. "This is a big discovery," says John Wefel of Louisiana State University and Principal Investigator for ATIC, Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter, a NASA [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/11/19/cosmic-rays-from-mysterious-source-bombarding-earth/)

timb
2008-Nov-19, 11:32 PM
Scientists have discovered an unidentified source of high-energy cosmic rays bombarding Earth from space. They say it must be close to the solar system and it could be made of dark matter.

The Dark Star cometh! We're doomed!

(Just getting in first)

John Jaksich
2008-Nov-20, 07:18 AM
Could this type of phenomenon (if it is dark matter) be the answer to the question as to whether and why we do not observe as many Super Novae in our galaxy as theory might predict...which is supposedly 1 per century?

It is my understanding that we should be able to observe (visually) a super nova ( and eventually the accompanying neutrinos ) if this were the case...( of course we did not have the proper detectors for neutrinos up to recently ) neutrinos.

Does anyone have any ideas?

Cheers

trinitree88
2008-Nov-21, 04:49 PM
Could this type of phenomenon (if it is dark matter) be the answer to the question as to whether and why we do not observe as many Super Novae in our galaxy as theory might predict...which is supposedly 1 per century?

It is my understanding that we should be able to observe (visually) a super nova ( and eventually the accompanying neutrinos ) if this were the case...( of course we did not have the proper detectors for neutrinos up to recently ) neutrinos.

Does anyone have any ideas?

Cheers

jaksichj. If you listen to popcorn pop, or a Geiger counter count background rates, you notice how intermittent the noise can be. The supernova rates are OK. We just happen to be in a small lull....they'll be a flurry of them to sort of compensate. Deep sky photos have shown two within weeks in some galaxies, and multiples within years, like the stats say they should. ;)pete



see: galaxies producing multiple supernovae 57 ... see:http://www.willbell.com/software/hypersky/sne_mult.htm


see:http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=4807105