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Salty
2008-Nov-20, 09:47 AM
If at first, you don't suceed: try, try again.

I've been thinking about this one, for over a week. We might get some mileage out of it.

I've noticed, there's several Texans and some Aussies, on this forum. Since the "Crocodile Dundee" movies, the Aussies now approach the Texas reputation of tall tales.

What I would like to do, is start off with a Texas weather story. Any of you may follow, with any appropriate...no religion nor politics...tall tale of your own. In USMC and USNR, we called 'em sea stories.

The rules are simple: designate if your story is true, fiction, myth, legend or a mix. Participants may vote to determine best story. How about once a week, for story of the week? Big Don, you are certainly welcome.

OK, Texas Weather tale #1:

This story has two true paragraphs and one fictuous: I try to keep my ** obvious.

It was January or February of '78, in downtown Ft. Worth. The radio news had forecast what we call a Blue Norther. I will now describe a blue norther.

I stood at the door to my employer, from which I could see a bank's digital time/temperature display, down the street. It was about 11:00AM and pleasant weather. About 1:00PM , I noticed the temperature had dropped markedly, but had not seen how many degrees. So, I started watching. People were in their shirt sleeves. By 2:00PM the temperature had dropped eight degrees. Shocked, I kept an eye out. To shorten the story, the temperature dropped 8d/hr, all afternoon. My mind became numb, trying to comprehend the energy at work in the atomsphere, to cause that much cooling over such a wide area. By 5:00PM, it was in the fifties and people had put on sweaters and jackets.

After work, I returned to the downtown YMCA, where I had a room. I changed clothes and was in the lobby. Some friends came dashing in, and said to come outside. I did. It was snowing. We had fun, with snowball fights. Then, I went in and went to bed. The next morning, it was below freezing. I went to work.

The next evening, it was terribly cold, below freezing by ten degrees. I walked over to the water gardens, and walked through the water gardens. Fountains in the pools were frozen, water up in the air. I got to the waterfalls and the surprise was supreme. The waterfall looked like a photo of itself in warm weather. You could see all the ripples and little eddies, frozen i n place. I stood there, trying to take it all in.

Looking around this icy wonderland, I took out a cigarette, and flicked my lighter. But, before I could touch the tip of my cigarette to the flame, the flame froze, it was that cold.

Okedoke, you don't have to be a Texan or an Aussie; if you have a good story, share it here.

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-20, 01:00 PM
This story has two true paragraphs and one fictuous: I try to keep my ** obvious.
I thought so.

It was January or February of '78, in downtown Ft. Worth.
That hit us on Jan 25.

The radio news had forecast what we call a Blue Norther. I will now describe a blue norther.
Wiki called that storm a bombogenesis (for Texas).

So; nothing can compare with that thing hitting us, which is probably the need for the **. :lol:

Salty
2008-Nov-20, 01:14 PM
I thought so.

That hit us on Jan 25.

Wiki called that storm a bombogenesis (for Texas).

So; nothing can compare with that thing hitting us, which is probably the need for the **. :lol:

I haven't seen one like that, since then.

What's a bombogenisis?

It came in hard and dropped below freezing, fast. And stayed there for about three days, or so.

Yeah, the extremeness of it did occassion some **.

Fazor
2008-Nov-20, 03:09 PM
Does it have to be a tall tale? Or are colorful narratives alright?

As far as weather related stories, one that stands out in my mind started as a simple fishing trip. My family and another family that are close have shared ownership in boats since I was little. One of the first ones our dads bought was a simple aluminum fishing boat (Brand name 'Fazer', and owned it back 'round '91 or so when I chose my screen name. Put 2-and-2 together...except you'd be wrong. It's still just a coincidence, as I hadn't noticed the brand name of the boat until after I picked the handle).

Anyway, my friend, myself, and our dads decided to go fishing. I believe it was late July, or early August. Warm enough days, but a little chilly at night. We went out late instead of our normal morning trips. The fishing was awful (don't' know that we caught a single fish), but while we were out, a storm came in. Unfortunately, the clouds hadn't arrived until after twilight, so we didn't see it coming. It started as a light drizzle...and we're men, no little rain drops were going to stop us.

Well, we were only maybe a mile from the boat ramp when the sky opened up. It was pitch black. The raindrops felt like they were the size of golf balls. Although we knew the lake like the back of our hands (we were out there at a minimum of 2 or 3 days a week); you couldn't see a single shore light. Being an extremely shallow lake (5-10 miles long, saying was you could walk from one end to the other), it was never safe to go fast at night ... plus anyone familiar with lake laws knows you're not allowed to go above a certain speed after dark.

What would have taken us 15 minutes under normal conditions took at least an hour and a half; but we finally made it back to the marina. The whole time I tried to take my mind off of how cold it was, but the constant shivering prevented that. We had no coats and were soaked to the bone. Any other time in my life I would have described it as hell, but I was around 13 years old, so instead it was just a cool experience that proved how sturdy and rugged we were.

But those are the kind of things that'd you'd gladly go through again if you could spend another day as a care-free 13 year old on summer vacation.

mugaliens
2008-Nov-20, 07:32 PM
I vote we vote on Saturdays, winners to be announced on Sundays.

One fine afternoon in the great state of Arkansas, I was out flying with a friend. I was shooting approaches, practicing for my instrument rating, when I decided to shoot an arc to an off-field VOR approach. We hit the 13-mile DME arc, and followed it about 170 degrees around to the outbound radial that defined the approach course.

As we tracked inbound, it seemed to take forever, which isn't surprising, as it was March, and the Spring winds were howling.

After about half an hour on that inbound radial, during which we passed a cropduster in a 60 deg crab, I raised the flaps, added power, and continued inbound, hoping to make the numbers and gas up before nightfall. Besides, my flying buddy had had too much cofee to drink, and was feeling the pinch, though not in the usual sense of the term.

The numbers finally came and went, and we touched down before taxiing to parking. After filling the tanks, I said, "I'll be I could set her down on the numbers and stop before she rolls off."

"Fifty bucks?" asked my friend, eager to wager back his cost of the fuel.

"Deal," I said, sure that the feat could be done.

We taxiied into position, before applying full throttle. During climbout, we drifted back enough that I could see the numbers, and again added full throttle, determined not to allow the brisk winds to blow us into the county behind us. As we crept up on the numbers, it took longer than before, so I had to wake him up shortly before touchdown.

Sure enough, I got her down on the numbers, but without thinking pulled the throttle to idle, and we rapidly drifted backwards into the overrun before I could hit the brakes, thus putting a hole in my pocket and a smile on my friend's face.

Salty
2008-Nov-21, 06:32 AM
We have a motion from Mugaliens, to vote for best story on Saturdays, and announce the winner on Sunday.

Each of you, please indicate aye or nay, or some such. I temporarily abstain, hoping for some more people, by then.

Let's get some more peoples' stories and votes, on this thread.:lol:

Salty
2008-Nov-22, 12:52 PM
I vote for Fazor's fishing story: it has the most drama of our three stories.

Why don't we give everybody until midnight Saturday night, GMT, to vote? And, how about voting may start Friday midnight, GMT? Is that alright?
And, stories for the week to be posted before or by Friday midnight, GMT?

I just bounced in to this one thread, and won't have time Sunday morning. I'll try to bounce in Monday morning, for this one thread. Then back Tuesday.

One vote per person and sock puppets may not vote, of course:)

Regards...

mugaliens
2008-Nov-22, 05:00 PM
Well, I like mine, as it was supposed to be Tall Tales, not real-life stories. For entertainment value, Fazor and Salty are tied.

Thus, I abstain this round.

Fazor
2008-Nov-23, 12:33 AM
I won't vote either; being biased. And I'm fine with only tall-tales coutning (which is why I started my post with 'does it have to be a tall tale?' :)).

chrissy
2008-Nov-23, 09:17 PM
Don't know if I am late in the vote count, but I would vote for Salty's story. :)

Salty
2008-Nov-24, 12:24 PM
Hi, All -

Thank you,Fazor and Chrissy, for your votes.

Now,Mugaliens story had a good suspense line. It's not easy, to keep the aircraft on the numbers. Even without a wind (my USMC job included giving Marine pilots their instrument hours in an electronic simulator). I've listened to all kinds of pilots talk about flying events in different aircraft, during and since my time in the 'Corps.

Ok, back to this thread. No, this can be true and tall tales, with the expectation that most truths are stranger than fiction. That's why I asked for those posting here, to let us know if it's true, a myth, legend, fiction or a mix. Any kind of good story, OK?

Uh, most Sundays, I won't be able to announce, since I don't have as much time, Sunday mornings as other mornings, the nights of which I work. So, could you three confer among yourselves, for which of you to announce on Sundays, or take turns announcing different Sundays? I'm not trying to duck out, on my thread. Just trying to deal with my hours. Because, the layout we have now, seems to fit most. Since this is a fun thread, the layout can stay open to adjustment, as we pick up more contributers.

Back Tuesday, read everything else and this, then.

Cheers,

Salty
2008-Nov-25, 01:18 PM
Gee, where did everybody go?

BTW, I make the motion that there be no prize for best story. This is all for fun and enjoyment. I open floor to other motions about prize (your opinions are as important as mine), or second of this motion.

Now, to my story.

I returned home to Texas from California, in late '72 or early '74. I stayed with my parents, a little over a month, until I could rent my own place. Whoever said, "You can't go back home", said that right.

After being head of home in Calif, I just didn't fit in at home, any more.

So, I went to Carswell AFB and bagged groceries for tips at the base exchange, and got enough money to get a garage apartment. I drove cab a few months, and I will get back to that in another story. Then, I got a job with the city of White Settlement, a suburb of Fort Worth. By this time, it was January or February of '73.
I went to work, one sunny and balmy Texas February day, with the road crew I was part of. We were patching the streets in the little town, wearing light clothes and short sleeve shirts. About 4:00PM, clouds came in from the south. By the time we knocked off and got back to the city barn, it was raining. On the way to the house, I saw more clouds, coming in from the north. I got home, ate and looked outside. It was sleeting. I went to bed, got up the next morning, and there was snow on the ground, over the sleet. It was c-o-l-d, cold. So, I dressed warm, and went to work in the freezing, frosted morning. By 9:00AM, the skies were clear and the sun shined down.
By 1:00PM, we were all back in our shirt sleeves. As I worked filling in chug holes with hot asphalt, I ran these weather events through my mind, and muttered, "I'm home."

Now, it's been 35 years, since then. I don't remember the conversations, from those days. So, I just wrote the story, without making up any conversation.

Okedoke, gentlebeings, I'm looking forward to your stories. With expectation of enjoying all of them.

mike alexander
2008-Nov-26, 10:15 PM
70's. True.

Driving from Ohio to NYC with my fiancee to pick up some furniture for her apartment in my '64 Chevelle. I believe it was the 120 hp 6cyl with 2 speed Powerglide transmission. What you might call a $100 car back then.

Around Stroudsburg PA (Friday night) it threw the water pump, right into the radiator. Found a garage willing to get me a new pump, installed Sunday. Radiator leaking in mid-NJ, so I closed off the bad tubes with vise-grips and hoped for the best. Got to NYC, where my father in law took one look at my car and suggested he knew a guy who could get rid of it under the Manhattan Bridge, no questions asked. As a grad student I had spent a significant portion of my liquid assets on the water pump, and most of the rest on a used VW Superbeetle waiting back in Columbus; this was a last-time use of the only car I had with even marginal power to tow a small trailer back across Pennsylvania.

We left about 9AM and headed west. Things were going along fairly OK, stopping every 50 mi or so to top off the radiator (brought along several gallons of 1:1 mix). Weather began to settle in (it's Dec 31, in the Northeast) but cool rain/slush could only help the engine.

Somewhere around Scotrun, I'd guess, we hit a decent hill and wheeeeeee!, the trans began to slip. Pull over and sure enough, she's leaking. I managed to nurse it to the next exit. Don't have enough money left to have a mechanic go over it, so I decide to gamble; buy a half dozen quarts of trans fluid and head out again. So now it's stop and fill the radiator AND the trans. I figured if I could just get past the mountains and onto the Ohio flat, we might make it. Two or three more stops for trans fluid. But we're rolling, we're rolling.

Just over the state line there's a final, fast wheeeeeee! and it blows out. I pull over to the side. It's about 10PM New Year's Eve and I'm sitting with a less than charmed fiancee on the berm of I-70. No cops - on New Years Eve!

About an hour later a farmer pulled over in his pickup and asked if he could give us a hand. After explaining he hauled a chain out of the back of the truck and slowly towed us to the next truck stop. Wouldn't take payment.

So, it's sleeting and getting colder. I get under the car and pull the trans pan and sure enough, the gasket had blown big time. Wander over to the truck stop garage to ask the mechanic on duty if he has any gasket material. Nope. Any cork sheet? Nope. Any Permatex? He rummages around in his toolbox and finally comes up with a dried out crumple looking like a used condom. No charge! Happy New Year!

Back to car. Fiancee NOT HAPPY. Check my trunk. Hey, you never know, the NAPA Fairy might have stopped by. No joy. Open the trailer and begin rummaging around, basically to be as far from the car as possible. And then...

There, staring at me, a box with a pair of fiancee's thigh-high boots (70's, remember?). At this point it's not the boots, but the box. I carry it over to the car and ask if I can have the box. I get THAT look. Take the box over to the garage apron along with the trans pan, open the cardboard out, put the pan down on the box and begin cuttting.

Back to the car. Crawl under, put the disco-boot gasket up, bolt on the pan. Pop the hood, pour the last of my trans fluid in, top off the radiator. Hood down, get in the car. "Oh," she says, "Happy New Year." I turn the key and put it in gear and we slide forward smooth as silk.

"Oh," she says, slightly different tone. "You fixed it." I smile and give it a bit of gas, then hit the brakes as stuff starts to fall out of the trailer, which I forgot to close. We both get out to pick up the stuff and she's beginning to laugh. Good sign. Back on the highway and the thing takes us smooth as silk into Columbus. As I'm pulling into the parking lot of her apartment the motor coughs once and quits. Out of gas.

35 years ago. Same girl still around.

Salty
2008-Nov-27, 05:48 PM
Thanks, Mike.

Now, if only some more folks post stories.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-27, 06:04 PM
Sorry Salty, I'm a terrible storyteller. But I enjoy listening. Great stories all, keep going...

chrissy
2008-Nov-27, 09:56 PM
Well this is back in October 2002, I went to Berlin/Polish border with the Medical corps on a big exercise, sleeping in the field isn't anybody's idea of fun especially that time of year, being a cpl I was navigator and co-driver for one of the trucks in the convoy was okay, it had it's bonus points, but the bus would have been cool as I could of slept. :(

We, the drivers and navigators had our briefing on the route and as an added extra, "what ever you do, avoid the Humber Bridge, if you take the wrong turn off, you pay the Toll". My thought's were snapped back to reality, "has it come to this, the army want us to pay our own way, next they will be asking for the travel money to any combat zone out of our own pockets too".

I climbed into my truck, clutching my map and route card, I will say that loosely, it was more like a few chapters from war and peace, it contained the route from the base to the ferry terminal here in the UK, then the route from Rotterdam to Guterslow, then all the way up to our location in an old Russian or Polish army base, a load of old ruins and a huge parade square.

We stayed the night in Guterslow, it was cold and the rain just wouldn't give up, we all slept in a big hanger, yup! guys and girls crammed together like cattle in freezing conditions, a clue to what's to come.

The next morning was a case of hurry up and wait, so me and a few R.E.M.E (royal electrical and mechanical engineers) played eye spy of all things and name that tune, we were bored! Then finally it was time for us to get back into our vehicles and continue our long trek, the poor guy who was driving was struggling with the driving (as were are used to driving on the "wrong side of the road") I had to remind him about going the other way around the round-abouts, I was reading the route cards and watching the other trucks infront and making sure the guys behind were still with us "convoy rules". This journey took a long time to get to where we were staying and I was already looking forwards to being back on the Ferry home.

We set up our camp and the weather was going from bad to worse, the nights were freezing cold and the days most of them were sunny but cold, as each day that passed the temp dropped a couple of degrees, thoughts of frost bite or ending up in a lump of ice were now on my mind, I needed cheering up that was for sure.

Then low and behold, my bit of cheering up happened, it was like all of my birthdays rolled into one. A young guy who was made an acting Sgt, was swanning it up doing nothing, waking up in the mornings, going to the dining tent and switching on a damn TV and watching anything that took his fancy, he never moved much from his chair, I tell you if we were there longer he would of made an excellent fossil of his butt.

He finally decided to help the chefs get some food out of the cooler wagon, he put on all of his kit, helmet, webbing and rifle and trundled over to the truck, pressed the button for the tailgate to lower down and he removed his kit (a no-no) dumping it down on the now lowered tailgate and proceeded to open the doors, when that small task was completed, he depressed the button on the floor and the tailgate rose, he felt like a king rising through the air to his little chilly domain.*CRACK, GRIND, CRUNCH, JUDDER, JUDDER* a strange noise came from his royal hoist, he collected what he needed from the back of the truck and lowered his royal hoist, locked everything up and trundled back to the cook house.

I was invited to take a look at what he and this other L/cpl were talking about, he gently lifted up his combat jacket, I was expecting a fluffy creature to pop out, instead it was the source of the *crunching, grinding and juddering*, my eyes widened and then I was rendered paralized with laughter, tears streaming down my face, I was almost choking for breath, there laid before me was a SA80 Rifle bent at the barrel at a 180 degree angle, something you only see in cartoons and I was seeing for real, after what seemed like hours of laughing and trying to compose myself, he asks me "what should I do?"
I had to break it to him kind of gently, "You better let the armourer know ASAP, because he will be doing a rifle inspection shortly, and you need to present him with yours, you fool".

He never lived it down and I had my cheering up that I longed for.

*True story*

PraedSt
2008-Nov-27, 10:12 PM
I tell you if we were there longer he would of made an excellent fossil of his butt.Sig worthy. :)

novaderrik
2008-Nov-27, 10:36 PM
this one time.. at band camp....

novaderrik
2008-Nov-27, 11:06 PM
actually, i've got a good weather related story to tell- and all true.
July 2, 1997 just west of Howard Lake, MN
about 5pm

it was one of those typical miserable MN summer days where it was 95 degrees and close to 100% humidity, with no wind to speak of.
it was a miserable day- and i was in a big metal building wedged between a swamp, a cornfield, and a set of 3 large turkey barns.
at around 5pm, the weather started to change- fast. the skies went from perfectly clear to eerily cloudy in about 15 minutes, and the temp dropped from the mid 90's to the mid 70's in about that same amount of time. there was also a slight breeze. it felt good- but not right.
i had to go out back to get a piece of lumber, and when i walked out the big overhead door, i saw one of those tornadoes that is about 1/2 mile wide moving slowly from west to east not more than a mile away. it was rather surreal- and moreso because i had relatives (aunt, uncle, 3 cousins) in a farmhouse right in that area. i watched it for a couple of minutes, and when i still saw that old farmhouse there after the storm went by, i went back to work.
about 5 minutes later, i look out the big overhead door on the south side of the building- and i saw one of those more typical tornadoes not 1/2 mile to the south, again moving west to east. i called a bunch of guys over, we watched it for a couple of minutes, and went back to work..
then it got weird..
suddenly, it got really, really dark- like shortly after sunset dark- and the air got still again. we could see a pretty scary looking wall cloud looking formation coming, so one of the guys walked out around the break room, which sticks about 50 feet from the south side of the building. about 10 seconds later, he came running back around the corner and yelling for us to get the doors shut NOW..
he had seen a tornado coming right towards us from the west, just on the other side of the turkey barns about 100 yards to the west of us.
as the big overhead doors came down, all hell broke loose outside. there was lumber flying everywhere, hail, the thickest rain i've ever experienced.. and the whole 400X100 foot building creaking and groaning from the winds. all we could do was sit there and watch- and try to hide under the tables that we built the trusses on.
after about 20 minutes of that, it suddenly calmed down, and the sun shined thru the hole in the roof...
the power was out, so we just looked around and assessed what got destroyed, which was nothing except that hole in the roof.
a couple of the forklift operators outside rode it out in the cabs of their forklifts.
an hour later, they let us go home. my first stop was my relative's house jut to the north- they were fine, but the old barn was kinda tilted to the side and leaning against a tree. the big tornado had hit a turkey barn about 1/4 mile to the north of them, tho, and there were dead turkeys and sheet metal siding scattered thru the trees for about 5 miles.
i headed home, which was 10 miles to the south of work in Winsted- which is where that smaller one i saw to the south went. it just kind of knocked down a few trees and power lines. i don't know what happened to the one that almost hit us head on- there was no damage from that one except the hole in the roof at work and a few scattered boards.
that big one to the north that took out the turkey barn wound it's way up to Buffalo and Monticello 20-30 miles away from where i was- and did a LOT of damage along the way. houses, trees, and power lines were taken out by that one. no one killed that i remembr reading about, tho.
the next day, the insurance companies tried to claim that the damage was caused by straightline winds- which they don't have to pay out for- despite all the witnesses and the 1/2 mile wide spiral trail of damage across 30 miles of MN country side. they lost, and had to pay up..
and that was about the coolest weather i've ever seen.

Salty
2008-Nov-28, 01:31 AM
These stories are good reading!

More people come and give more stories! Iiinpuut. Want more input.:lol:

I'll bounce in Saturday morning, to vote. I hope there's some more, to vote between. See ya then.

mahesh
2008-Nov-28, 01:50 AM
B D is a walking talking story-teller...a rare art!
hope he's okay, haven't bumped into him, recently...
Hey B D, Happy Thanksgiving....and Big Bad Boo, you too, hon!

megrfl
2008-Nov-29, 12:32 AM
Tall Tale

Interview with a Neanderthal.

Wilma’s Story. Interview conducted by megrfl.

Note: Wilma communicates through sign language. as she is unable to speak.

Q. Wilma, describe the social structure within the Neanderthal tribes?

A. <Laughter> The males as I understand them to be today, were exactly the same in our era. <Sigh> They only wanted one thing… FOOD! They were the hunters. We (females) did not allow any overnight hunting trips and they were instructed to bring home the kills immediately. Women maintained control of fire; the males had no means to make it nor did they understand how to make it. The women prepared the meat and we had “first feed” as we called it, the males got the leftovers. <Laughter> Every evening the females gathered around the fire, ate and drank punch. The males would pace behind us waiting for their turn. Sometimes we would throw them a bone, usually aiming for their heads, bonk! <laughter> Good times.

Q. Wilma, it sounds like the females were the dominate gender. Is this an accurate assessment?

A. <Snort> Yes. If it were up to the males; there would have been extreme overpopulation. The females were the authoritarians. Every decision was ours.

Q. I see. You say that you know the truth behind the ultimate demise of the Neanderthal, would you care to share your story?

A. Yes, I think the story should be told.
One male among the tribes known as Imbecile led the males on hunts and fishing trips and etcetera. He was an older male (28) and was well respected among the males. Unbeknownst to the females, Imbecile was organizing the males to end what he called the tyranny. Imbecile devised a plan. His plan was to destroy every female, thus ending the tyranny and allowing them full control of food and decision making.
The males set the day and followed through with their plans, wiping out every female Neanderthal. A week long celebration ensued.

Eventually the entire tribe went *Homo… Sapiens, that is. The Homo Sapiens enslaved the remaining Neanderthals. Imbecile attempted to win over the female Homo Sapiens; this was observed by the Homo Sapien males and they without a moments thought, brutally killed Imbecile. The Homo Sapiens males did not allow the Neanderthals to even glance at the females. Thus, no interbreeding occurred, ending the bloodline of the Neanderthal.

*Not that there is anything wrong with that. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Outing
Note: This is a condensed version of the original text.

Neverfly
2008-Nov-29, 05:23 AM
Tall tale indeed. Totally unrelated to weather, however.

novaderrik
2008-Nov-29, 07:11 AM
Tall tale indeed. Totally unrelated to weather, however.
well, if Neanderthal was still around, maybe we wouldn't have global warming. cuz, you know, our species is the cause of everything bad.
that's kinda weather related, isn't it? but i don't think the OP wants to limit this to weather related stories. i think they just want Big Don to tell some carrier stories..

Salty
2008-Nov-29, 12:20 PM
i wish ya'll, or some of ya'll, would start voting, before I do. My morning is noon, GMT. Oh, well, bless your hearts, if none of you are early risers.

Ok, I can't make up my mind between Novaderrik's tornadoes story and Mike Alexander' adventure story. All the other stories are equally good. I don't favor weather stories, so much, as that's what I started with...first thing to memory. I ruled out my own weather story#2, because I wandered from the rules, when I forgot to designate it was true.

So, anyway, I'll not vote, this time .

The tornadoes story had suspense, drama and a happy ending (nobody reported killed).
The journey story had the same, plus romance and a dab of humor.
Chrissy's story was a good adventure, with humor. I'm looking for those, too, so keep 'em coming.

Megrfl, I think you were just joking, that all I wanted was BD's carrier stories. I want all kinds of stories, from all kinds of people. Including, of course, BD's.

Hmmm, maybe BD is letting us run, without his commanding presence. I grant, he's the hands down best story teller on the board.

So, ya'll go ahead and vote, and one of you please announce the winner. Again, my Sunday mornings are taken. See ya Tuesday.

FYI, my early mornings are for errands and chores, to be done by 0800local.
The nights I work, I usuall stay off my computer. This way, I don't give in to my addiction to the computer game I like.

megrfl
2008-Nov-29, 02:39 PM
Tall tale indeed. Totally unrelated to weather, however.

I don't even get a chuckle. :sad:

Salty
2008-Nov-29, 03:09 PM
First, I want to apologize, to everybody. Nine days ago, Mugaliens voted that we all vote on the stories. I then made a motion for the same, and asked if there were a second to vote on the stories.

There has been no second to that motion.

Consequently, I would like to say, since there has been no second, that we no longer vote; there's no deadline to story submittals; there's no announcement of winner.

I don't have to evaluate stories and maybe alienate people.

Hereafter, if you have a story, post it. This is now a thread to swap stories and not judge anybodies writing or story.

Now, I can get some sleep. I'd run my errand and done my chores and took my medication and gone to bed. Couldn't sleep. Had to get up to do this. I'm sorry I was so spread out on BAUT and another forum, that I didn't notice this eight days ago.

Enjoy.

Veeger
2008-Nov-29, 03:29 PM
I was driving with a group of friends from Ohio to Chicago, U.S. 30 the entire distance. We were just out of high-school and didn't want to spend our hard earned cash on the turnpike. I recall the trip was very spontaneous and completely unplanned. Late one Friday evening one of our group suggested, "hey, let's go to Chicago" and by 11 PM we were in the car driving, planning to arrive by morning. Somewhere in western Ohio, eastern Indiana, the fog had rolled in so thick it was nearly impossible to see the edges of the road and I felt safest when following a set of tail lights in front of me. Of course, I hoped he knew the road better than I and wouldn't drive us both in to some drainage ditch at the side of the highway. At some point, I think it was around 3:00AM, I was navigating the highway without assistance, no other cars to follow, friends all asleep, when I thought I saw headlights up ahead flashing. I instinctively slowed thinking there might be trouble. The fog was relentless and prevented any hope of making out visual details. I approached the flashing lights slowly and suddenly lunged to a stop when I realized a train gliding down an unmarked crossing was causing the headlights of the car on the other side of the road to appear to flash as the wheels of the train passed between us.

By now, my friends awoke, possibly from the lunging stop, possibly from my own shriek. "What's goin' on?"; "We nearly ran into the side of that $*@$! train!!". I was shaken to realize how disasterous that could have been: heavy fog, unguarded crossing, train with no lights - I hadn't realized until that moment, train cars have no side marker lights. As I sat there, letting the calm return to my bones, I became aware of another light to my left. The sudden awareness of certain death ripped into my brain at the same time as the blare of a train horn. We were sitting over another track and another train was coming, very fast!

A car had pulled up behind about that time as I slammed my car into reverse and executed a backward "s" maneuver to the shoulder on the opposite side of the road. As we sat there out of harm's way, visibly shaken and the shudder of the approaching freight train, increased, I became aware of a small building at the side of the crossing, and a wirey old man emerged waving a lantern. The freight train poured over the crossing as he shuffled back into tiny shack to continue dozing off for the night.

After all the trains had passed and traffic moved on, we continued to sit for a time. I comtemplated "visiting" the old man in the shack and expressing my displeasure. I decided in the end, why bother? We were going to Chicago. We had adventures to experience and we best be about it.

After all these years, I still think about that trip to Chicago. I have been there many times since, but looking back I realize it was the trip more than destination that impressed me that weekend.

megrfl
2008-Nov-29, 05:32 PM
Veeger, your story is gripping. Florida can have some of the worst fog, and I can't stand driving in it. I usually make up my mind that I am dead and just drive as safely as I can.

mugaliens
2008-Nov-29, 08:40 PM
I was hot. Late May. Could have been June. The air hung like a hot, wet towel, dripping on into the night. No mosquitos were out. Even the crickets were quiet. Unusual for Arkansas.

I was staying at the Comfort Inn, second floor, North side, towards the West. I'd spent the last twenty minutes talking with the wife, outside, leaning against the walkway railing, the streetlit parking lot below.

The conversation was winding down, much the same as always. She needed this, wanted that, me always promising the moon, never able to deliver. I looked up, looking for the Moon through the blanket overhanging us, but nothing, not even the glimmer of a star. It was so thick it seemed like a wall. I was half tempted to yell, to see if I'd hear an echo. It was so hot, sweat-stuck clothes sticking to my back and front whener I moved. No breeze, not even a hint. Just, nothing. Except a couple crickets.

My wife went on, another topic. I looked down at my beer, about gone. Time for another. I felt it, first, before I heard it, the gentle whisper of a breeze. "Storm coming," I said out loud, not caring if she'd heard me or not. The breeze grew stronger. "Gust front," I thought, as I began to hear it rustle through the trees across the parking lot.

It picked up tempo, a couple of quick whisps, one behind me, another in the trees. "Yeah," I thought out loud. "She's here."

"Who's there?" asked my wife, but I'd already dropped the phone to my side, wondering...

"Can't be..." I thought, dazed at how fast it was building, the trees just eighty feet in front of me beginning to bow in the wind.

It sounded like someone shuffling a deck of cards, only louder. Then, small, black squares tore around the side of the building, to my left, curving rapidly into the parking lot, below, slamming into cars. A couple of windows broke.

Dazed, I stared at the trees, their tops bowed to the right. More shingles swirled overhead. The sound went from a whistling breeze to a thunderous roar in about three seconds, as the trees now bent to the full force, most bending at their trunks, completely horizontal. A chest-banging crack, like dynamite, then another. A full-grown oak flew sideways in front of me, smashing through the woods, taking out trees, loosing branches.

My ears popped.

BANG!

Shocked out of my stupification, I held the phone, yelling over the afterburning crescendo, "TORNADO!" and turned to find my room door slammed shut behind me. I fumbled with the handle, my ears popping a second time, then struggling against the pressure to force it open as debris swirled all around me, my eyes shut.

Inside, I lept on top of the far bed, rolling off between it and the bathroom wall, and waited for the next onslaught.

Nothing. Just silence.

I opened the door to debris raining down from the sky. Shingles were all over the parking lot. A powerline was down, but dead. I looked right, at the highway. Cars were stopped, trees thrown across it like pick-up sticks. My car was fine. There were no broken windows, but trees just eighty feet in front of me, directly across the parking lot, were down. Big trees. Old trees.

I called my wife, told her what had happened.

*****

True story, folks. Happened in May or June of 1994, in the Comfort Inn in Jacksonville, Arkansas. The next day roofers were busy repairing the shingles. I was told they were 115 mph shingles, which the roofer said, "but that's just what they're rated for. They don't really start ripping off until about 140, 150." We were later told the winds across the parking lot were in excess of 200 mph to do that sort of damage. There was no track, as it just touched down, then popped back up.

Where I was, I don't think I got more than about 20-30 mph. Then again, I was standing smack dab in the middle. I'd been in the eye of the tornado, all twenty seconds of it. The whole thing, from the first whisps of wind until everything just died down couldn't have lasted more than thirty seconds, total.

Here's a GoogleEarth shot of the building (with blue shingles, now - the old ones were black) and some annotations.

The Best Western wasn't built, yet - it was all forest. Same with the houses to the left - they weren't there in 1994. I was where it says, "Me!" (where else?) and the forest across from me was, as you can see by the GoogleEarth ruler, 80 feet away. The trees that were uprooted or broken in half by the winds wound up strewn across the highway to the right. The hotel just South of us was untouched.

As for me, that was the most interesting event I ever experienced in Arkansas, and the most interesting weather event I've experienced, period. Before that, I used to think storm chasers were nuts. Now, I'm of the opinion it'd be a kick in the pants, provided one was careful, of course.

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d185/mugaliens/ComfortInn-Jacksonville-2.jpg

Veeger
2008-Nov-30, 01:56 AM
Having grown up in the midwest, tornadoes were the one thing that literally gave me nightmares as a kid, Mugs. I have felt the effects of many including a killer that roared through N.E. Ohio and into PA on 31 May 1985.

A few years ago, I actually saw one in broad daylight as I never felt comfortable cowering in a basement. It was much bigger and impressive than I ever thought from all the videos I'd seen on TV and yet this was a small one which bounced a few times and then disappeared. Your experience Mugs, is still the stuff of nightmares, Mother Nature at her pent up worst. One second talking to your wife, the next lying in a pile of rubble. Glad the worst didn't happen to you, Mugs.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-30, 05:00 AM
I don't even get a chuckle. :sad:
It was funny. Especially this sentence:
Sometimes we would throw them a bone, usually aiming for their heads, bonk! It was the 'bonk!' that did it. A very funny word, 'bonk'.

Two questions though. Yes, I know about artistic licence, but:

If it were up to the males; there would have been extreme overpopulation.This might have saved the species? And:
The males set the day and followed through with their plans, wiping out every female Neanderthal.How did Wilma survive? :)

Neverfly
2008-Nov-30, 05:03 AM
I didn't find it funny. It struck me as a load of many sexual stereotypes and prejudices and was about as accurate as a chimp playing darts.

mugaliens
2008-Nov-30, 12:38 PM
Having grown up in the midwest, tornadoes were the one thing that literally gave me nightmares as a kid, Mugs.

I apologize if my rendition was too graphic.


I actually saw one in broad daylight...

I'm somewhat disappointed it was nighttime! The only reason I saw the shingles and trees was bue to the parking lot lights as well as the orange lights illuminating the highway off to my right. I saw only the glimmest ghost of the tornado wall itself. But the roar was as is commonly described - a dozen freight trains or airplanes in full afterburner, etc.


One second talking to your wife, the next lying in a pile of rubble. Glad the worst didn't happen to you, Mugs.

LOL, it wasn't quite that bad! No rubble, and except for a bunch of shingles, some soffet/facia, a light, and a couple of windows, the building I was in was otherwise undamaged.

It was very dirty, though - it looked like a giant bus had driven by and splashed a very large mud puddle all over the north side of the building. The "debris" was all from the woods, so plenty of pine needles, deadfall, and, yes...

...a shrubbery (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UbtcmjfKa8)!

megrfl
2008-Nov-30, 03:31 PM
Two questions though. Yes, I know about artistic licence, but:
This might have saved the species?

I think Wilma has shown that regardless, the species would have been wiped out.


And: How did Wilma survive? :)

Meet Wilma:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/09/080917-neanderthal-photo.html

She's a real beaut, a little rough, I mean when I shook her hand; well she insisted on a hug, well a bear hug with a good solid wack on my back... <cough>, cleared my lungs. Kool chick tho. :)

megrfl
2008-Nov-30, 03:46 PM
I apologize if my rendition was too graphic.

mugaliens, you are a talented writer! Do you have anything published? If not, you should submit a chapter or two to a publishing house. Get that ball rolling.

megrfl
2008-Nov-30, 04:51 PM
I didn't find it funny.

I appreciate your honesty and I will take it into consideration.


It struck me as a load of many sexual stereotypes and prejudices and was about as accurate as a chimp playing darts.

Surely, you don't think that Imbecile =s' Neverfly? That's redunkuless.

I've come to the conclusion that you and I are like oil and water. I being the water, refreshing. You being the Exxon Valdez oil spill of my baut forum life. Image shows how my rubber ducky feels.

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/7816/duckiesrb4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

You win. Hands down. Enjoy!

Neverfly
2008-Nov-30, 04:58 PM
I appreciate your honesty and I will take it into consideration.



Surely, you don't think that Imbecile =s' Neverfly? That's redunkuless.

I've come to the conclusion that you and I are like oil and water. I being the water, refreshing. You being the Exxon Valdez oil spill of my baut forum life. Image shows how my rubber ducky feels.

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/7816/duckiesrb4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

You win. Hands down. Enjoy!
Yeah whatever.

You typed out a story that is degrading to men, praises women as superior, blames societal problems on men etc...

Then throw accusations that I'm the Exxon Valdez oil spill that I'm SO BAD for your refreshingness.

:rolleyes:

Whirlpool
2008-Nov-30, 05:13 PM
I appreciate your honesty and I will take it into consideration.



Surely, you don't think that Imbecile =s' Neverfly? That's redunkuless.

I've come to the conclusion that you and I are like oil and water. I being the water, refreshing. You being the Exxon Valdez oil spill of my baut forum life. Image shows how my rubber ducky feels.

http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/7816/duckiesrb4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

You win. Hands down. Enjoy!

That is a Flat out - AD Hom.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-30, 05:14 PM
I was invited to take a look at what he and this other L/cpl were talking about, he gently lifted up his combat jacket, I was expecting a fluffy creature to pop out, instead it was the source of the *crunching, grinding and juddering*, my eyes widened and then I was rendered paralized with laughter, tears streaming down my face, I was almost choking for breath, there laid before me was a SA80 Rifle bent at the barrel at a 180 degree angle, something you only see in cartoons and I was seeing for real, after what seemed like hours of laughing and trying to compose myself, he asks me "what should I do?"
I had to break it to him kind of gently, "You better let the armourer know ASAP, because he will be doing a rifle inspection shortly, and you need to present him with yours, you fool".
What happened to this guy Chrissy? Officially I mean?

PraedSt
2008-Nov-30, 05:26 PM
Surely, you don't think that Imbecile =s' Neverfly? That's redunkuless.
I don't know about Neverfly, but I found the use of the 's' after the equals sign fairly redunkulous.

Whirpool's right. I don't know about Ad-Hom, but that was uncalled for. Especially because of your piece. If I had written such an openly sexist post, I probably would have been booted off this forum.

megrfl
2008-Nov-30, 05:28 PM
Yeah whatever.

Whatever.


You typed out a story that is degrading to men, praises women as superior, blames societal problems on men etc...

So, what's the problem. I have many male friends, I mean best friends, including my very hottie, babe husband. We spend our time laughing. We all have suffered and have had to be serious many times in our lives, just as everyone else. Nothing beats a good laugh and especially if its at ones own expense.


Then throw accusations that I'm the Exxon Valdez oil spill that I'm SO BAD for your refreshingness.

Well, my refreshingness, has suffered. :sick:

Neverfly
2008-Nov-30, 05:31 PM
So, what's the problem. I have many male friends, I mean best friends, including my very hottie, babe husband. We spend our time laughing. We all have suffered and have had to be serious many times in our lives, just as everyone else. Nothing beats a good laugh and especially if its at ones own expense.

It was not at your own expense.
It was at the expense of others.

Tell me something.

Why did you choose to write about Neandertals?

Tinaa
2008-Nov-30, 05:35 PM
2. Civility and Decorum

Politeness is the top rule here. Of course, we expect to have spirited debates! That’s fine, as long as the people involved extend one another basic respect. Disagreements are inevitable, but even in those situations you must still be nice.

Attack the ideas, not the person(s) presenting them. If you've got concerns with what someone is saying, feel free dismantle their arguments, but do not resort to ad hominem or personal attacks. Be mindful and respectful of others' feelings. If you feel that someone has crossed the line and insulted you, please contact one of the moderators, preferably via the reporting mechanism described here, or by PM or email. Don't write scathing posts in the forum to try and humiliate people publicly.

If these guidelines are not followed, the administrators/moderators will take swift and appropriate action, so please behave accordingly.

megrfl
2008-Nov-30, 05:48 PM
It was not at your own expense.
It was at the expense of others.

Tell me something.

Why did you choose to write about Neandertals?

Specifically Wilma.

http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/81479-adams-revisionist-history-neanderthal-should-have-taken-our-place-7.html

Starting at post #192.

Nothing more, nothing less.

megrfl
2008-Nov-30, 05:57 PM
I don't know about Neverfly, but I found the use of the 's' after the equals sign fairly redunkulous.

Thanks.


Whirpool's right. I don't know about Ad-Hom

As to Neverfly's reaction, I sincerely thought that (Imbecile equals Neverfly) may have been what he thought I meant. Which is redunkulous.

Neverfly
2008-Nov-30, 06:02 PM
Thanks.



As to Neverfly's reaction, I sincerely thought that (Imbecile equals Neverfly) may have been what he thought I meant. Which is redunkulous.

That thought had actually never even occurred to me.
What occurred to me was that you wrote a sexually degrading story. My reactions are blunt and straight forward. I have a history of that here on BAUT to attest to it. Had I thought that you meant me when you said Imbecile, I would have come right out and confronted you about it.
That is how I work.

Anyway... I'm tired of this topic now. Moving on.

megrfl
2008-Nov-30, 06:24 PM
That thought had actually never even occurred to me.
What occurred to me was that you wrote a sexually degrading story. My reactions are blunt and straight forward. I have a history of that here on BAUT to attest to it. Had I thought that you meant me when you said Imbecile, I would have come right out and confronted you about it.
That is how I work.

Anyway... I'm tired of this topic now. Moving on.

Lovely.

mugaliens
2008-Nov-30, 07:05 PM
Meet Wilma...

Must I? She looks a little peeved. Someone probably snatched her DNA. I don't date 43,000 year-old women, anyway - that's about hree orders of magnitude beyond my limit.

Can we get back to the Tall Tales, now? I think the oil slick is dissipating...

chrissy
2008-Nov-30, 09:22 PM
What happened to this guy Chrissy? Officially I mean?

I think he got charged for it. "marched infront of the CO". When we all returned from Germany, they headed for the bar and watched the Rugby, I missed it "England won Australia". :dance:
I said my good-byes and headed back to my unit, as I was only on loan to them for a month.

chrissy
2008-Nov-30, 10:42 PM
Back in 1990/91 I was new to all this going out on exercise, this was a first for me, we were briefed in what was happening, given the grid reference what defences they wanted and the info on the enemy, everything we needed to know. I was scared, excited and worried all rolled into one, I climbed into the bedford and placed my fate in the hands of the driver to take us "to the war zone".

The Colonel at the time was a Lt.Colonel Flowers, a nice guy who climbed the ranks a man who in many peoples books knows what we are going through.

We reached our location and had to set everything up, then was told to dig a shell scrape (this will be explained), we were taken to our allocated points shown our arc of fire and told to carry on, at this point I just glazed over, my mind was racing WT.. is a shell scrape? I was standing there with a spade in my hands looking at a tree I was told to dig this thing near and yet I had no clue, a Cpl saw my desperate look under all this green and brown cam cream and helmet, he quickly explained to me, " it is a shallow enough hole, so you can lay in with a mound at the front and a space in the centre so you can lay your rifle and shoot at the enemy, ok"? he smiled and walked away.

"Oh! a shell scrape???????" I thought to myself..... I started to dig and it was more trouble than I expected, roots and rocks, my spade was clashing with the rocks and I hated cutting into the tree roots, while I was doing this I could feel eyes everywhere, then the Colonel and a Major stood infront of me, the Colonel piped up, "Is everything Ok Private...?" He and the Major giggled a bit, I felt I was the butt of the joke, I heard snickers coming from behind me and when I turned there was an audience, my face getting reddder and redder.

The Colonel stepped towards me and said, "You seem to have a lot of rocks, do you have any plans for them when your done?"

Without thinking my words through and before I could stop my mouth from uttering anything it came straight out, "yes sir, I am going to build a bloody rockery and plant some flowers." More snickers came and the small group of spectators, became a large gathering, reality dawned straight away in what I had just said, I wanted the earth to open up and swallow me, "I_I_I'm s_o_ sorry sir" he just laughed knowing my mistake and asked if he could help me. There was a sudden gasp from this gathering behind me and then a silence waiting for my reply.

"If you like sir" was the only words that came out as I was affraid that if I kept my mouth open for any longer it would have uttered something stupid again.

He took his webbing off and his pistol, he handed that to his Major and took the spade out of my hands, "I'll dig you scrape out", he said.

He was fast and this damn shell scrape wasn't a shallow hole that was supposed to just give me ground cover, it was a deep pit like a trench and about 6ft deep that shallowed to the rear, I am only 5ft 2in tall!!! He took a step back and was proud of his efforts. "there you go, now where do I sleep?" he said jokingly.

He covered it with leaves and it was a sight to behold, it blended well with the floor.

Later that night we had a "stand to", we all legged it to our "shell scrapes" I had to put some rocks down so I was able to peer over the top but it served its purpose, then after what seemed like a few hours and my poor heart to regulate itself worrying incase there was enemy sneaking around, we were stood down.

When the hectic night passed without really much, just the odd poacher I and another guard had to chase away, no major incidents happened, I was proud I made it through the night.

Then a young female was wandering around, scratching her head and looking very lost, I thought she had lost something during our late night "stand to".

"What's up?" I shouted.

She came wandering over still dazed and turning to see if what ever it was troubling her would appear. "Last night, when we had a stand to, I fell into a hole and I couldn't get out and I can't find it anywhere", she said.

I knew what hole she was on about and so too did the lads who were sat with me, I was struggling so hard to contain my fits of laughter building up like a steamer wanting to vent itself very loudly..."Are you sure you ran this way?" I replied "you didn't go around the back of the landrovers?"

"No, I definately went this way, but there isn't a hole here!" she said, still scratching her head.

I was a bit confused too, as I never filled in the hole either, so I decided to wander around, in an *effort* to see if the hole she was looking for was gone or further away, the leaves that fell from the tree covered any evidence of a hole ever being there and from the secret hole fillers identity being discovered too.

To this day I have never told her nor did I find out who the secret hole filler was.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-30, 11:09 PM
Without thinking my words through and before I could stop my mouth from uttering anything it came straight out, "yes sir, I am going to build a bloody rockery and plant some flowers."
And I would never have guessed you were so cheeky. :D

Salty
2008-Dec-03, 08:31 PM
I read first, and enjoyed all the stories. I have a tornado story for later, but want to tell one, thatChrissy's bent rifle story reminded me of.

I'm late because an unexpected delay yesterday, moved my purchasing another power supply for my laptop, to today. I made my purchase and here I am.

OK, some background for this and other stories while at Marine Corps Airs Station (MCAS) El Toro, in Orange County, California. My job was to simulate Ground Control, Tower, Approach and Air Control, while a Marine pilot practised his instrument flying in my simulator. There were six simulators (each a Link 2F3 Ground Instrument Simulator), in a large air conditioned room. When I first reported to Headquarters and Headquarter Squadron (H&HS), at El Toro, the unit I reported to was called Aviation Training Aids Unit (ATAU). A few years later, our unit was renamed Training Department.

We became the Training Department, when the Staff Leadership School moved into the second floor of our building. This was an infantry school, for Staff Sergeants, Gunnery Sergeants and other senior staff NCO's. Now, how this applies to us aviation types downstairs, is that the Staff School's Lt. got permission from our CO to ask for volunteers. The staff NCO's needed men against whom to polish their lessons.

So, all of us downstairs loved to volunteer. We'd put on grubby civilian clothes, fall out at the bus, and ride to the location of the exercise. Before we got on the bus, we were issued M-14's, from the base armory. The bus took us out into the uninhabited county, behind the base.

Approximately summer of '64. This is a true story. There are no innocents, so names have not been changed.
This particular night exercise was to be a frontal assault, against the emplaced staff NCO's. They were on the side of a hill, with a ravine in front of the hill. It's been over forty years, so I forget how we assembled, in that ravine. I have the impression, that our platoon was divided, and we went into both ends of the ravine, and met in the middle. When in position, we were to advance out of the ravine, uphill, and overrun the Staff NCO's position. That was the exercise. I was close to the middle.

Before our Lt. gave us the word to advance, there was [blank rounds] gunfire, to our right. Me and the men around me, froze. Something was wrong. The word came down the line, keep your position, and open fire. So, there had been a change. We passed the word, and opened fire from the cover of the ravine. Then, "Check! Check!".
Down the hill came running and leaping and hopping and howling with laughter, Cpl. S. Hargraves. His left hand was over his head, holding his M-14. His right hand, with something long on a handle, was low to his right side. As he came closer, we saw he was carrying the Staff Leadership School's M-60 machine gun.

That was our and our corporal's moment of glory. He (and then also we) had captured the M-60. He joined us in the ravine, and there was much back slapping and high fives. Our Lt. came and got the M-60, and returned to the Staff NCO's. Then, the exercise repeated, this time as originally planned.

What had happened, as the two parts of our platoon fed into the ravine, the left hand side went past the center. When the men on the right side met up with them, we stopped. This left part of the right side, extended past the left side of the Staff NCO's position. Instead of correcting, our LT. took the initiative and let our right wing out flank the Staff NCO's left flank, and then envelop their center, from the rear. Our corporal was running downhill and firing, came to the Staff NCO's machinegunner, jerked the M-60 from the gunner's unbelieving hands, and ran on downhill to our position.

We were deliriously happy, laughing and carrying on.

This is the exact opposite of Chrissy's story, but somehow I was reminded of this, by her story.