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rodin
2008-Nov-21, 12:43 AM
What are the limiting conditions for matter to collapse?

Since cold fusion requires close nuclear approach involving palladium electrodes is this indicative of a nuclear catalyst?

If concept of nuclear catalyst is viable could this lower the threshold sufficiently for a collapsed state of matter to exist at planetary core? In effect pushing the reaction p + e = n ( ignoring neutrino for the moment) over to the right?

edit

can someone fix that title spelling 4 me...?

Van Rijn
2008-Nov-21, 09:35 AM
What are the limiting conditions for matter to collapse?


You would have doon better to limit yourself to this question, though this is a very broad one. And I would ask, are you talking about what limits the collapse of a main sequence star? A white dwarf? A neutron star? A brown dwarf? A terrestrial planet? Something else?



Since cold fusion requires close nuclear approach involving palladium electrodes is this indicative of a nuclear catalyst?


Now, this is starting to look seriously ATM. There is a distinct lack of evidence that palladium electrodes affect nuclear fusion. So, the answer is "no."



If concept of nuclear catalyst is viable could this lower the threshold sufficiently for a collapsed state of matter to exist at planetary core? In effect pushing the reaction p + e = n ( ignoring neutrino for the moment) over to the right?


See previous answer. The answer is "no." There are things referred to as nuclear catalysts, but they don't apply under these conditions. Among other things the pressures and temperature are trivial compared to what you would find in a star. If you're very lucky, you might just get a rare single fusion caused by other things. Wouldn't have much effect on the planet, though.

trinitree88
2008-Nov-21, 12:28 PM
What are the limiting conditions for matter to collapse?

Since cold fusion requires close nuclear approach involving palladium electrodes is this indicative of a nuclear catalyst?

If concept of nuclear catalyst is viable could this lower the threshold sufficiently for a collapsed state of matter to exist at planetary core? In effect pushing the reaction p + e = n ( ignoring neutrino for the moment) over to the right?

edit

can someone fix that title spelling 4 me...?


rodin. Muon catalyzed fusion in palladium, and sometimes titanium is still the subject of interest in some places. Since ambient cosmic ray showers can initiate this....while you're setting up your experiment....it can go off on you. Not a characteristic easy to control, or quantify when you look at the data. Hence the oddities in the cold fusion world. pete

typically a muon can catalyze about 100 fusions before fizzling out..(they decay ....see:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muon)


and see:http://www.triumf.ca/welcome/text_only/h-fusion.html

Van Rijn
2008-Nov-21, 07:13 PM
rodin. Muon catalyzed fusion in palladium, and sometimes titanium is still the subject of interest


What is the evidence that palladium or titanium affect muon catalyzed fusion? If you have a tank of deuterium, and shoot some muons into it, you can get some fusion events, whether or not there is palladium or titanium in the vicinity. The fundamental problem with muon catalyzed fusion is that muons decay very rapidly, and ultimately they are very rare.

rodin
2008-Nov-22, 12:35 AM
What is the evidence that palladium or titanium affect muon catalyzed fusion? If you have a tank of deuterium, and shoot some muons into it, you can get some fusion events, whether or not there is palladium or titanium in the vicinity. The fundamental problem with muon catalyzed fusion is that muons decay very rapidly, and ultimately they are very rare.

This is new to me that muons catalyse fusion (in fact I am not sure what a muon is - will read up about). But interesting idea since recent work suggests something coming from the sun (neutrinos?) catalyses fission.


Unexplained periodic fluctuations in the decay rates of Si-32 and Ra-226 have been reported by groups at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Si-32), and at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesandstalt in Germany (Ra-226). We show from an analysis of the raw data in these experiments that the observed fluctuations are strongly correlated in time, not only with each other, but also with the distance between the Earth and the Sun.

http://www.physicsforums.com/archive/index.php/t-252518.html

rodin
2008-Nov-22, 12:42 AM
You would have doon better to limit yourself to this question, though this is a very broad one. And I would ask, are you talking about what limits the collapse of a main sequence star? A white dwarf? A neutron star? A brown dwarf? A terrestrial planet? Something else?

A general description of the limiting factor for collapsing matter is what I seek. Surely it is a product of pressure and temperature? At a high temp would more or less pressure be required to collapse matter for example? Is there a temperature high or low enough to allow collapsed matter to exist at the Earth's core?

Has anyone factored in the magnetic attraction of aligned dipoles into the collapsing force?

And finally, how can mini black holes exist or even be contemplated if there is a mass threshold multiples of our earth'srequired to produce collapsed matter?


In principle, a black hole can have any mass significantly above the Planck mass.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_black_hole